Regis PT Students Run the Boston Marathon

Three Regis DPT students put aside their studies for a weekend and ran the Boston Marathon.  Congratulations to Jenna Carlson (3:43:44), Lauren Hill (3:06:06) and Nolan Ripple (2:49:29) for racing and representing our program! 


 

Name: Nolan Ripple, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Portland, OR
Hometown: Peoria, AZ
Fun Fact: Lacrosse player freshly converted to marathon enthusiast.

unspecified

Some History on the Boston Marathon:

The Boston Marathon is one of those things that runners dream about.  The legacy, culture, international diversity, and enthusiasm that it brings are bar-none top in the world for marathons.  The Boston Marathon is the oldest continuing running marathon in the world, with its debut in 1897.  On April 17 2017, I was fortunate enough to run in the 121st running of this prestigious event.  For a little background, there are qualifying times for each age group in order to partake.  In my own age group, males 18-34 years old, the cut-off times for selection were 3 hours, 2 minutes, 51 seconds.  That comes out to be just about 6:59 pace/mile for 26.2 miles.  Rigorous qualifying standards are one of the chief reasons why this race holds so much honor.

This was also the 50th year celebrating women running in the race.  The first woman to do so, Kathrine Switzer, was 20 years old when she ran and completed the Boston Marathon.  It’s an interesting story: she had to register under the name “K.V. Switzer” to feign a guy’s name, in order to receive a race bib.  And during the race, a Boston Athletic official tried to rip the bib off of her, but she kept running.  Eventually, she finished the race, and started a tradition of males and females competing each year in this run.  It’s the spirit that Kathrine had that inspires runners from all nations today.


I was a lax bro in undergrad, but a concussion my senior year made me decide it was time to be a Forest Gump for my last year college. Completing a marathon was my first official running goal, and I did that in May 2015 with a time of 3:25:32.  Shortly after, I set my sights on Boston, and worked my butt off to achieve a qualifying time in my next marathon—Phoenix 2016 with 3:01:59, and then Eugene 2016 at 2:55:44. Going to Boston was a dream—namely because it was the first big goal I had set for myself.  My marathon buddy, also conveniently named Nolan, was going to be running with me.  In addition, both of our families were there (shout out to my Crazy Aunt Cathy).  I scored big: a trip to Boston, time off of school, and my dad with his credit card to pay for everything out there!

Boston itself is worth another story.  Great place, amazing people, and awesome food.  Ask Leigh Dugan (’18) if you have further Boston questions.

Fast-forward to Race Day: April 17th.  I had to wake up bright and early to get shuttled from Boston out to Hopkinton because the race is a one-way shot starting in a suburb west of the city.  Upon arriving, there is a massive Athletes’ Village with bananas, bagels, coffee, Gatorade, water, and some tents to relax under.  I had been on an intentional 3-day coffee withdrawal, so the buzz was about to get real.  Thousands of people were shuttling in, and in total, 30,000 runners went through that village.  I met up with Lauren Hill (Class of 2017), and she hooked me up with some pre-workout gum and extra gels (aka liquid play-doh).  We chilled out at the tent for a bit, and then made our way on the .7 mile walk to the start line.  Love how we get to walk .7 miles to the start line pre-marathon… Not like I’m worried about hitting my daily FitBit goal.  I got to my corral, hit the bathroom like 4 times, and then joined a mob of skinny freaks like me in the gate.  Luckily, I was in Corral 2 of Wave 1, so I got in there early and all comfy with my fellow strangers.  We also got to watch the “elites” walk by, who are basically Olympian super-humans.

 

Fast-forward to Race Day: April 17th.  I had to wake up bright and early to get shuttled from Boston out to Hopkinton because the race is a one-way shot starting in a suburb west of the city.  Upon arriving, there is a massive Athletes’ Village with bananas, bagels, coffee, Gatorade, water, and some tents to relax under.  I had been on an intentional 3-day coffee withdrawal, so the bfuzz was about to get real.  Thousands of people were shuttling in, and in total, 30,000 runners went through that village.  I met up with Lauren Hill (Class of 2017), and she hooked me up with some pre-workout gum and extra gels (aka liquid play-doh).  We chilled out at the tent for a bit, and then made our way on the .7 mile walk to the start line.  Love how we get to walk .7 miles to the start line pre-marathon… Not like I’m worried about hitting my daily FitBit goal.  I got to my corral, hit the bathroom like 4 times, and then joined a mob of skinny freaks like me in the gate.  Luckily, I was in Corral 2 of Wave 1, so I got in there early and all comfy with my fellow strangers.  We also got to watch the “elites” walk by, who are basically Olympian super-humans.

IMG_2685.jpg

Lauren Hill (’17) and Nolan Ripple (’18) share a picture before their race

The gun went off at 10:00, and we were under way.  The first 3 miles are almost impossible to pass, because it’s like an endless herd of cattle running to the feeding lot.  It’s also mostly downhill and flat for the first 5-10 miles, so 99% of runners go out too fast and have it come back to haunt them later.  At mile 5 it’s really hard to know how you’re going to feel at 25—pro tip.  It was also a really warm day for running.  The course started at 74 and sunny, which may sound perfect.  But when you’re depleting your body of water and electrolytes for 26+ miles, you’d rather have it 20 degrees cooler.  Anyways, you can’t bitch because it’s part of the fun, and a race is never perfect.  I digress, so back to the race! I’m sitting at a nice pace, feeling good, when I realize we’re running by the Wellesley College girls somewhere around mile 13.  It’s an extraordinary stretch of girls that are holding signs asking for all sorts of things, and a probable drop out point for single males.  I gave some high fives, laughed a bit, blew some kisses, and kept jamming.  Shortly after, I ran by a group that I presume to be Boston University students, which I would like to call the “Booze Tunnel.”  It was about 11:30 am, but 5 o’clock for this rowdy bunch.  I considered taking a celeb-shot on the Beer Pong table, but worried that I’d be left dusted by the Chilean dude running next to me.  Somewhere around mile 15 or 16, my GI system decided to implode, kinda like a Michael Bay film.  I found the nearest porta potty, deciding losing a couple minutes was better than dealing with a disaster situation.  Back on course after that though.  I decided Espresso Gu’s wouldn’t be the fuel of source anymore, because I’d end up comatose in a porta potty for sure.  So I took an endurance gum this time.  It gave quite the kick, and got me rolling again up to Heartbreak Hill.

IMG_2688.jpg

At the hill, I saw Tiffany (Class of 2018) and Mike who were cheering loudly.  Mike had a beer for me, but I had to politely pass (hopefully the only time I say no to a beer ever again).  Going up Heartbreak Hill was challenging, but I knew flats and downhills followed to the finish.  I popped another endurance gum in around mile 21 and kept going.  At this point, you just keep trying to put one foot in front of the other, because all joints start to hurt.  I always wonder if this is what old age is like. The last 5 miles of the course were completely packed with spectators; this was incredible.  I had an American flag on a stick that I kept with me all race (not sure why still), but people loved it.  Coming down the final corner on Boylston street, I saw my family and family friends… alas!  I was in a mental limbo of ecstasy and fatigue, but passing them was the final fuel for me to finish.  They are all amazing!  I came across that final stretch thinking of all the friends, family, colleagues, teachers, and strangers who have supported me in running, and in life altogether.  I had tears in my eyes when I finished, not from pain, but joy, gratitude, and humility.

If you have read this far, you are one of those people I am talking about.  The support you guys have given me is UNREAL.  This was more than a race to me, it was about setting a goal, working hard, and having others propel me towards a dream.  I lived that dream on April 17, 2017.  I finished in 2:49:29, which was a PR for me.  I have many more goals now set, but this was a big one.  I run because I love it, and I love to compete.  Boston gave me both.

Passion and persistence are two tenants I strive to live by.  Finding a passion, and pursuing it are two staples that I cling close to.  It’s easy to be passionate about something for a week, two weeks, or even a year.  But keeping the same drive day in and day out is a bear.  People saw the last 26.2 miles of training, but not the 1,500 miles that preceded it.

This whole experience was so rewarding because I saw 30,000 other people pursuing something similar to me, and that fire that comes with running.  It’s an art, an expression of oneself.  Others find it in different ways, whether it be in their profession, other hobbies, or relationships they build with others.  It’s amazing to see what’s possible when you love something, and when so many other people go out of their way to support you on that journey.  I love you all for being the kindling to my fire.  Thank you!!!


 

Name: Jenna (Carlson) Jarvis, Class of 2017
Undergrad: Boise State University
Hometown: Broomfield, CO
Fun Fact: My personal record in the mile is a 5:09, but I still would really like to go sub-5 someday.

IMG_7589.jpg

Boston is a one of a kind race. Beyond the prestige associated with running one of the few US marathons that requires a qualifying time, everyone told me that people would be cheering me on the entire 26.2 miles and the magic of the race would carry me.  They were right.

The race starts off with you and your closest 7,000 similarly paced friends, standing too close for comfort in a small coral, waiting for that gun to go off.  When it finally does go off, don’t expect to actually start: it will take a while for everyone in front of you to start moving!  The next few miles are still crowded with people running a similar pace, guiding you along to the pace you should be running when you want to hurry down the hills.  The remainder of the race follows the roads of different towns going toward Boston; they’re all lined with cheering fans and accessorized with an insane number of volunteers handing out hundreds of cups of water and police officers and military personal ensuring you are safe.

When people told me there would be people cheering the entire course, I thought they were exaggerating.  They were not.  It is one of the most incredible and exhilarating things I have experienced in a race.  Within each town, there were hundreds of people that line the streets, screaming, holding signs, handing out orange slices and water bottles, and giving you all the encouragement you could possibly need from a crowd.

One of my favorite parts of the race was around mile 13 in Wellesley, MA, home to Wellesley College.  Here, the enthusiasm and energy of the college students was even higher than the previous crowds; I got a big boost of energy, purely because these women looked like they are having so much fun cheering people on and it reminded me that I should be having fun, too!

IMG_7640.jpg

The thing I loved the most about running the Boston marathon, however, was the incredible people running the race.  The elites run the marathon in incredible times, but I can’t help but be amazed by what can be done by the rest of us 40,000 mortals.  The energy at the starting line is so supportive and exciting.  Then, as the course drags on and on and as people are getting more and more exhausted, there was (if possible) even more encouragement given to each other. A man came up to me around mile 11 and asked how I was doing.  I lied and told him I was doing alright, and he replied that he was having a hard time with the heat.  I told him he would get through and be fine and he told me the same; this little act of encouragement and kindness meant so much to me.  I saw athletes with amputations and in wheelchairs powering up hills, and it inspired me to keep pushing on when I was hurting because they were probably working harder and hurting more.  I saw runners helping others who were delirious from exhaustion.  I saw some runners carry a woman across the finish line when her legs were no longer willing to carry her.  How can you not be inspired by these people and the incredible things they do for each other?

The race I ran was not what I had wanted.  It was certainly the hardest, most painful race I have ever run.  As a PT student, very often our clinicals, boards, and life take precedence over training (as they rightfully should!). Those things took a much larger toll on me and my training than I thought and would have liked.  Even so, I gave everything I had out on that course that day, and for that I am happy.  Overall, the Boston Marathon did not disappoint.

IMG_1231.jpg

 

How to Find Your Work-Life Balance in PT School

Name: Tom Sears, Class of 2019
Undergrad: Wheeling Jesuit University
Hometown: Moundsvill, WV
Fun Fact: I once gave a ten minute impromptu (and decidedly silly) speech about apples for an undergraduate class.

The king of the world in the Appalachian Mountains.jpg

The ultimate question for me once I found the perfect PT school (Regis) was:

How do I balance the rigors of PT school with my family, friends, and all the responsibilities that accompany everyday life?

This is the question. So, what is the (your) answer?

Well, to begin… I am fortunate enough to be blessed with a beautiful wife, a dog and cat (the cat is temperamental and bites for no apparent reason), and a house (and the lovely mortgage and maintenance that goes along with it). Oh, and my wife and I are in the process of adopting a child! And, well, I have friends and hobbies and I even like to workout on a regular basis.

my-dog-rufuss-puppy-class-graduation1.jpg

My dog Rufus’ puppy graduation

So, how does one achieve this so-called balance? The most important piece of advice I can give you is to surround yourself with a good support system. Let your friends know that your life is changing (for the better) and you will need them to be patient with you. Ask them to check in with you on how studies are going, to celebrate with you when you do find the time (celebrate that anatomy lab practical being over!), to understand when you have to turn down their invite to try line dancing at the Grizzly Rose, and to be there when you need to decompress.

Tom honing his favorite pass time with his brother.jpg

Tom plays music with his brother to de-stress

My wife has been SO supportive of my endeavor, and for me this was imperative. Be sure your spouse or significant other is forewarned of the change that’s about to take place. If you don’t have an “other,” let your family and closest friends know. They likely cannot fully appreciate what the experience is like, but have this talk…Let them know you will need them by your side. You will be in school much of the day and studying more frequently than you ever have before. You won’t always be as available as you would like. Get them on board! And perhaps best of all, be prepared to meet some truly awesome new people. These are perhaps the only people in your life that will truly understand what this experience is like. You may be amazed to see how quickly you become close with your classmates. Lean on them!

Service Learning at the Denver Indian Center.jpg

Service learning with my classmates

The other essential part of work-life balance: develop a routine—a routine that fits with your needs. This, of course, will be difficult to determine at first. But alas my young apprentice, it will come. This may mean planning your days out to allow for your studies or for time to relax/decompress. Think forward to your assignments that are due and allot enough time to finish them.

I have talked with 2nd and 3rd years (much wiser and more experienced than I) and for a few of these folks their answer revolved around boundaries and separation. They would arrive to school at 7 AM and leave at 5 or 6 PM. During this time they would study with absolute focus. You know, the kind that doesn’t involve watching Youtube clips, posting tweets, or watching a ball game in the background (okay—guilty as charged!). And when they came home, they were with their family and friends. Truly with them. This was not my answer, but it could be yours.

Professional ceremony with my wife and family.jpg

Professional Ceremony with my family

My answer was not so easily developed at first. I have a dog at home who had not been out for 8+ hours, and thus I feel the need after class to return home to let my beloved furry friend out for a long walk. I then return to my studies before joining my family for a nice conversation and an episode of Game of Thrones.

Whatever your familial and personal needs are, plan accordingly and give time to them.

The next key to work-life balance: build into your routine a time for rest. Whether you’re parking your gluteus maximus, medius (and other various muscles) in your most comfortable seat to watch the weekly Steelers game, checking out one of the local breweries with your peers, or enjoying the wondrous outdoor activities that Colorado has to offer, find the mental and physical space you need to completely unplug from schoolwork.  No matter how much time you spend on studying, you may never feel like you are as on top of the material as you would like to be. But trust me: this time will refresh your mind, reinvigorate your resolve, and ultimately help you to perform optimally in PT school.

Fireworks night with the Colorado Rockies.jpg

Fireworks night with the Colorado Rockies!

Oh ya—and there is this thing called exercise. Chances are you’re a fan (or will at least be soon). Some of my peers elect to put this on the back burner. I would strongly suggest keeping exercise in your routine. For me, blasting some 1975, John Legend, or Tool and going for a run is the perfect way to clear my mind and prepare me for a night of studying.

It is well worth an hour of your time to keep your routine, practice what you preach, and prepare your mind not just to cram, but retain the material at hand. This will bring you closer to your future success as a PT.

Your routine may take time to develop, but that’s okay. If you had all the answers to achieving optimal balance for success in your new PT career right now, you would be the first! Be steadfast in your resolve and be flexible. Prioritize your needs and you will find your answer!

Meet Maggie McKenna: Why Regis?

Name: Maggie McKenna, Class of 2019
Undergrad: University of Dayton
Hometown: LaGrange, IL
Fun Fact: I’ve been skydiving twice!

IMG_1066.jpeg

Deciding where to go for a Doctor of Physical Therapy education is a big, life-changing decision…but also a very exciting one! Unlike some of my classmates, I didn’t know exactly what I was looking for at first, so my decision process took time. In the end, though, it was Regis that caught my heart and it hasn’t let go since.

14732187_10154259311892639_7437316174268529117_n.jpeg

Service Learning!

Here are a few (of many) noteworthy reasons I ultimately chose Regis:

The faculty: I remember being very impressed with the faculty on my interview day, and my admiration for them has only grown in my short time here. All are experts in their specific fields of study, in addition to being involved in many leadership positions throughout the APTA. Most notably, our professors know us as individuals and treat us as equals. They respect and listen to our insights, questions, and concerns and do their best to support us any way possible.

IMG_0913.jpeg

On top of Breckenridge Mountain with classmates

Colorado: I am from and went to undergrad in the Midwest (Go Flyers!), and was ready for a change of place…and altitude! I traded in the gray, flat, windy Midwest (still love you, home) for three years of sunny days, mountain views, and powder-filled weekends. I was drawn to the mountains and the breathtaking playground it offers.  And when I do miss city life, downtown Denver is just a ten-minute drive away. There is something for everyone here in Colorado! I’ve been here six months and there is still so much more to see and explore—mountains and city alike!

IMG_0588.jpeg

On top of Mt. Bierstadt!

Jesuit Values: Catholic education is very important to me (17 years and counting!), but by no means do you have to be Catholic or religious to attend Regis. I was drawn to the Catholic education and values that Regis and the Jesuit community stand for because they are ones I hope to embody both as a physical therapist and in life. Through our professors, peers, and curriculum we are encouraged to exemplify these values by caring for the whole person, providing service locally, nationally, and globally, as well as being leaders in our field, practicing with integrity, and collaborating with other professionals.

FullSizeRender.jpeg

Hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park on a weekend

Regis was and is the right place for me; I absolutely love it! I chose the place that would help me be the best version of myself, and encourage you all to do the same with your exciting decision ahead. We at Regis are hopeful it will lead you here!

IMG_0503.jpeg

Sky Pond, RMNP

A Typical Day as a DPT Student in Colorado

Name: Alex Lubahn, Class of 2019
Hometown: Winona, MN
Undergrad: University of Minnesota
Fun Fact:I won my elementary school’s cursive handwriting contest 3 years in a row
received_10210790697736291.jpeg

What to do in Colorado…such a simple question but so difficult to answer. Why? There are about a million different amazing things (give or take) to do in this beautiful state. Do you want to climb a mountain? Sure! Golden, CO has gorgeous hikes and views only a 15-minute drive away.

MountBierstadt.jpg

Want to climb bigger mountains? Sure, a 90-minute drive and 9,000 feet up will bring you to the top of Mount Evans, one of Colorado’s 53 14’ers.

MtEvans.jpg

Not into the outdoors? That’s all right because Denver’s city life has everything: breweries (154 of them), a botanical garden, a tremendous zoo, the historic Union Station, trampoline parks…Let’s be honest—what more could a person ask for?

DowntownDenver.jpg

Since moving to Colorado for PT school, I cannot get enough of the outdoors. Although my first semester at Regis felt like I spent years in the library studying what the heck that brachial plexus thing consisted of, every study break I had, I was headed west to the mountains. As much work as school is, you have to give your brain a break; the outdoors is the best way for me to de-stress.  For me, it’s usually a toss up to decide if I want to go for a nice easy hike, climb a 14er, or camp up in the mountains.  It’s all unbelievably close and easy to access.

SkyPond.jpg

Even in January when the weather gets a tad too chilly to hike, there is still fun to be had. With the cold comes snow, and with snow comes 30+ world-class skiing resorts (not to mention all the backcountry skiing opportunities).

Keystone.jpg

Although the mountain ski resorts are covered in 60+ inches of snow to play in in the winter, Denver still manages to bring warm weather blessings. At the start of the spring semester near the end of January, it was a ridiculous 62 degrees in Denver…yeah, sunny and 62 degrees?  I’m from Minnesota.  Imagine how I felt. 

Here’s my ideal weekend day in Colorado:

  1. Wake up bright and early
  2. Meet your half-asleep friends at Burrito Giant for a breakfast burrito before heading up to the mountains (Fun fact: Denver is basically the breakfast burrito capital of the world).
  3. After one of the most beautiful drives you’ll ever experience and the best tasting burrito you’ll ever eat, you arrive at the base of Mt. Bierstadt. The 14,065 foot mountain looks daunting as its peak pierces through the bright blue sky. The only thing you can think of is what the view will look like from the top.
  4. Hike! The fresh mountain air fills your lungs and with each step you can feel yourself getting closer to the summit.

Side note: hiking up the mountain is exhausting; remember that you’re a PT student and exercise is good for you, so suffer/enjoy your trek up the mountain.

  1. Make it to the top!

After crossing mountain streams and hiking through massive valleys, you’ve made it. The view at the summit makes you feel like you are on top of the world–an extremely unique and fulfilling feeling. 

  1. You whip out that delicious peanut butter and jelly sandwich you artfully prepared at 6:30 that morning and enjoy the majesty that is the Rocky Mountains. I can’t think of many things better than awesome views and even more awesome classmates to share them with.
  2. After soaking in the beauty for a bit it’s time to head down the mountain.
  3. Finish off the day with a short (or long) stop at the Crooked Stave Brewery back in Denver!

There you go: a beautiful (and typical) day in Colorado.

I cannot express how blessed I am to be a part of such an amazing school in such an amazing place; I look forward to all of the adventures yet to come!      

Finding Your Work-Life Balance in PT School

 

Name: Katherine Koch, Class of 2019
Hometown: Cleveland, Ohio
Undergrad: Ohio State University
Fun Fact: I’ve run two marathons!

                 Profile Pic.jpg               Physical therapy school is tough; that’s true no matter where you go. You’ll be challenged more than you were before and in ways you never were before—academically, intellectually, emotionally, existentially…the list goes on and gets even more dramatic. However, when you go to PT school at Regis and you’re living in Colorado, life gets simultaneously better and tougher. The upside is that you have a seemingly endless outdoor playground to frolic around on, and the downside is that you can’t spend all of your time doing that.

Group Hike Gem Lake Pic.jpg

Some of the Class of 2019 conquering a weekend hike

I grew up in Cleveland—the land of Lebron, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame, and the river that caught fire. Even though Cleveland rocks, Denver stole my heart pretty much as soon as the plane touched down. And, my first winter living in Colorado has proven again and again that this is where I want to be! Living near mountains provides the perfect pasture for snow bunnies to hop around with skis, snowboards, snowshoes, or just in hiking boots.  It seems as if the sun is always out (a welcome change from the dreary Midwest), and the motivation to go outside and get active is hard to ignore—especially with the free outdoor rentals at Regis!  If mountains aren’t your thing, Denver is a vibrant metropolis filled with fantastic local restaurants, breweries, museums, parks, and more. As biomechanics professor Dr. Erika Nelson-Wong likes to say, “it’s a beautiful day in Colorado,” and Erika is almost never wrong.

File_000.jpeg

Katherine and her classmates climb a 14er–Mt. Bierstadt!

So: the mountains are great, Denver is  a super cool city, and…what anatomy exam?? Like I said, PT school at Regis will challenge you in a myriad of ways, one of the foremost being time management. As much as I love exploring the city and the outdoors, there are days when I feel like I barely see that enduring sunlight. Classes are long and the work can be arduous. That’s why I’m pretty sure the phrase “work hard, play hard” was invented by a former Regis graduate. We work incredibly hard to become the best clinicians we can be, but we also know that work-life balance is precious and  we must strive to maintain it. On our first day of orientation, foot/ankle master Dr. Tom McPoil urged us to take one day out of the week to not prioritize school, but instead to prioritize everything else. I personally take every Saturday to not even think about school; I go hiking or for a long run or have a movie marathon or explore downtown or literally anything else—but I forget about school for a day. Then, the rest of the week, I have the energy and motivation to focus on school.

File_000 (1).jpeg

A Halloween study break

While Saturday is a saving grace, weekdays aren’t totally lost to school and studying. No matter how interesting the class is or how captivating the professor is (which they all are!), sometimes it’s tough to sit in class all day and then go home and study. There are many evenings where a group of classmates will check out a new brewery, get some air at the trampoline gym, play pick-up sports, or explore the restaurants on nearby Tennyson Street. Most Denver museums have free admission days once a month; I love checking them out!  Regardless of what your hobbies are, it’s easy to find something you will love.

File_000 (2).jpeg

Celebrating Josh’s (front and center) birthday at Sky Zone last week with the classmates!

I think Regis is wonderfully unique in that we are encouraged to embody the concept of “cura personalis.” You’ll be intimately familiar with this phrase by the end of your first semester, as we are often reminded that one small part of the body is tightly intertwined with the rest of the body, the mind, and the spirit. We learn to be physical therapists who practice this care for the entire person with our patients and with ourselves. I know that I will not be the best physical therapist I can be if I don’t reward my hard work with some well-deserved time off. Most of my classmates, including myself, were fortunate enough to have multiple options of schools to choose from, and I’m sure I could have gone to any school I was accepted to and worked hard to succeed. However, I came to Regis—and to Colorado—because I knew I would learn how to become an outstanding physical therapist while also becoming the best possible version of myself. And after countless hikes, one 14er climbed, falling on my face 6 times while skiing, 2 excursions to local breweries, 1 snowshoeing experience, 1 trip to the Denver Botanic Gardens, and meeting some of the best friends I could ask for, I’ll say with 100% confidence that I made the right choice.

Group Holiday Party Pic.jpg

Ugly Holiday Sweater party after finishing first semester

Move Forward 5K/10K Recap

Move Forward 2016 (September 17, 2016) was a huge success! We had 261 runners signed up for the event and raised over $7,000 for Canine for Companions and The Foundation for Physical Therapy. A sincere thank you to all of our volunteers, runners, and sponsors for making this event amazing.  If you have any questions, suggestions, or would like to be involved in next year’s race please email us at moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com.

ryan1

Our beautiful sign made by Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson!

ryan2

Fastest Faculty Awards go to Andy and Amy.

ryan3

Our service dog Takia, making sure we don’t forget who we are raising money for…

ryan4

A few racers/volunteers enjoying some yoga after the race.

ryan5

Post-Run Fun!

14380008_1145412288885547_3105692028706017427_o.jpg

Our Couch to 5K team did amazing this year! Next year, maybe a 5K to 10K team?

ryan7

No one asked Matt (Class of 2017) to dress up, but that is just how great this man is…

ryan8

Class of 2017’s Move Forward Team; great job, everyone! The Class of 2018 has some big shoes to fill…

ryan9

We can’t wait for the start of next year’s race!

 

unspecified

Ryan Bourdo, co-director of Move Forward, graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo.

ryanpic3