Service Learning in PT School

Name: Austin Adamson, Class of 2020 Service Officer

Undergrad: Saint Louis University

Hometown: Laguna Niguel, CA

Fun fact: I recently dove with manta rays and sea turtles in the Great Barrier Reef!

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As students of physical therapy, we are undertaking a career that is founded upon the ideas of service and care for others. We spend countless hours in both classrooms and clinics learning a craft that allows us to heal our patients and restore their function and participation, ultimately serving them in a life-altering way. But, for many students of Regis University, the call to serve others extends beyond the classroom. It is a part of who we are, and who we are called to be.

The young Class of 2020 has only recently begun its efforts to serve beyond the community of our school and classmates. Our first service effort began in February, in celebration of Valentine’s Day. Members of our class were generous enough to donate time and toys to Children’s Hospital Colorado to wish children and their families a happy Valentine’s Day.  Both the Van Gogh’s and the less successful artists in our class handmade over 150 cards, sending best wishes and love to remind every child that they are cared for, even through the challenging time of a hospital stay.

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These cards accompanied nearly $100 worth of toys and games that helped make the time in a hospital more enjoyable for the children being treated, their siblings, and their parents.

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Left to right: Josh H, Auburn BP, and Austin A delivering Valentine’s Day cards and toys to children at Children’s Hospital Colorado.

With the turning of the seasons and the coming of beautiful summer weather, members of our class turned to the mountains to participate in a trail building and conservation effort for National Trails Day.  On a warm Saturday, a small group of students and significant others made their way out to Hildebrand Ranch Park to volunteer with Jefferson County Open Space.  The group worked to construct a small section of new trail that will be opened in 2019, and also helped maintain an existing section of trail by cutting back overgrowth of invasive plants.

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Left to right: Meghan R, Nicole R, Emily P, Austin A, and Hannah D serving at Hildebrand Ranch Park.

Ask any Coloradan, native or otherwise, and they will tell you about the importance of trail work! As avid nature hikers, trail-runners, and mountain bikers, the Class of 2020 will continue to give back to the beautiful mountains we know and love as well as the community members who use them.

These are just a few examples of the service and work being done for others by my classmates and professors. Service is an integral part of our time here at Regis University, and is preparation for a lifetime of service as we will enter the field of physical therapy with hopes of serving our patients and empowering their lives. Some are called to service through the Jesuit Mission that is incorporated at Regis, which teaches us to be men and women for others. Some draw strength from acts of selflessness that bring joy and comfort to others. And still others enjoy building a community by meeting new people in service opportunities, and sharing experiences with one another. Regardless of the reason, the students of physical therapy at Regis University work to be engaged in both the local and global community. We are pursuing not just a degree, but the ability to shape a better world through our work!

5 Ways to Spend Your Time When You Are Not Studying…

Name: Courtney Backward

Undergrad: Oklahoma Wesleyan University

Hometown: Salina, OK

Fun Fact: I am the world’s most awkward high-five giver/receiver.

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One of my classmates once said “PT school is neither a marathon nor a sprint. It is both at the same time.” That statement resonated with me on a personal level. During my first year of PT school, I found myself drowning in homework and responsibilities. The temptation to ignore almost every other aspect of my life in order to survive school was strong. However, I found that this did not help my stress levels, and it only added to them in a negative way. Instead, I found that taking good care of my life outside of school is the foundation of taking good care of my school work as well. Sometimes taking care of yourself means…NOT STUDYING…yeah, that’s right! So, here are 5 ways to spend your time when you are not studying:

  1. Find a good hang out spot:
    • From coffee shops to book stores to the bar down the street. Find a spot you can unwind and relax. Some favorite local spots include Allegro Coffee Roasters, BookBar (if you are looking for a one-stop shop), Goldspot Brewery, and Local 46. All of these are 3-5 minutes from Regis and are just scratching the surface of the many hangout locations in the Denver area.

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  1. Exercise:
    • Whether you are a yogi, cross-fitter, avid runner, cyclist, power-lifter, or intramural sport phenom, you can find Regis DPT students covering the exercise spectrum. Joining a fitness club is a great way to connect with other people in the community. However, if you are into exercise options that are easy on the bank account, find a friend and exhaust the available free Youtube exercise videos or try out the many trail running paths nearby. If you love organized, competitive sports, Regis offers many different intramural sports. Our classes frequently compete together as a team and have won several championships (not to brag or anything…). Whatever you like to do for exercise, take advantage of opportunities and use it as a stress relieving activity.

 

 

(please enjoy the slo-mo video of Lauren’s epic trick shot)

  1. Get outside:
    • If you don’t take advantage of the outdoor activities in Colorado, you may be missing out on some serious soul medicine. From hiking to park days to outdoor festivals downtown, get out and enjoy the famous Colorado’s 300+ days of sunshine. Some enjoy tackling 14-ers over the weekends, others find beauty and excitement in the lower, half-day hikes. Some of my favorite lower hikes include: Mt. Galbraith Trail Lily Mountain Trailhead and Herman Gulch Trailhead. Our PT class loves to plan park days where we take advantage of the city parks to play volleyball, corn-hole, have a cookout, or just soak up the sun. These activities are very therapeutic and immensely enjoyable!

 

  1. Practice your creativity!
    • I often am so impressed by the creativity and talent that is displayed by many of my classmates. We have dancers, painters, poets, woodworkers, talented chefs, etc. Although my creativity is often derived from Pinterest, it is so much fun to put my creativity to work. Wine and paint nights can be a fun way to relax and unwind with friends. Some individuals enjoy improv dancing to help them to express themselves while others channel their inner “foodie” and put their chef skills to the work (I, personally, am very thankful I have friends with this talent). One thing to keep in mind when practicing creativity is to NOT get caught up in perfection. You are not being graded on this! I know this is a hard concept to understand in PT school. Just have fun with it and let your mind or body be free to run wild!
  1. Don’t think about school!!
    • School is very important. Responsibilities are very important. Becoming a capable physical therapist is very important. However, prioritizing your health and balancing your personal life is imperative. Remember that you are a multi-dimensional person and that is a beautiful thing. Take time to calm your mind. Take time to spend with your friends and family. Take time to treat yourself. We work hard at our school work, so don’t forget to work hard at other aspects of your life as well!

 

Chris Lew Reflects on Working With 2017 Opus Prize Winner

What is the Opus Prize? 

The Opus Prize is an annual faith-based humanitarian award that is designed to recognize and celebrate those people bringing creative solutions to the world’s most difficult problems. The award partners with Catholic universities, although recipients can be of any faith (Excerpt from Crux.).

Mercy Sister Marilyn Lacey received the Opus Prize from Regis, the host for 2017. Chris Lew, 3rd year Regis DPT student, assisted in her work in Haiti for displaced women and children as an Opus Student Scholar. Here is his reflection about his experience in Haiti, initially published in the Jesuit Journal of Higher Education.

Name: Chris Lew, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Portland
Hometown: Eugene, OR
Fun Fact: I have a whistle reminiscent of various fairy tale soundtracks…or so I’m told.

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Throughout my life I’ve had many opportunities for international travel – from travel abroad to Granada and London, a Fulbright scholarship to Madrid, and a service-learning immersion trip to Nicaragua, I have always considered myself blessed to be able to travel the world, experience different cultures, and see the world from a different perspective. Nevertheless, my time performing a site assessment in Haiti at Mercy Beyond Borders (MBB) for the Opus Prize was a unique and eye-opening experience.

MBB was founded more than 30 years ago by Sister Marilyn with the vision that education, especially of women, is the key to overcoming the widespread corruption and poverty that has consumed Haiti and South Sudan. Through my research of the Opus Prize, I understood this site assessment was different from the typical trip to an underserved community. From the initial interview to the final trip preparations, it was made very clear that the purpose of these trips was not to do; rather, the intention was to be, to see, and to experience. It was this aspect of the Opus Prize that interested me most in the organization and its mission. There is a plethora of groups in developing and underserved areas that perform charity work such as building houses and providing medical goods and services. While this service work provides a certain degree of benefit to the community, I have always been somewhat hesitant of this type of altruism because it generally fails to provide long-term, sustainable change to an underlying societal problem. What happens when the volunteers leave and no one is left to provide the necessary medical services? What happens when a fire destroys a new house and there are no resources to build a new one? This traditional type of charity work seems to be a superficial bandage over a much deeper, wider wound.

This is where Opus is different.

The Opus Prize Foundation emphasizes six values that it seeks in the recipient of the Prize. The one that stands out to me most is Sustainable Change. Rather than focusing on a top-down, government-focused approach to solve global issues, Opus intentionally sponsors and supports organizations directed towards community development and cooperation. Opus understands that the resolution of profound societal problems and corruption is ultimately driven internally, not externally. As such, the Prize acknowledges individuals who are addressing the root of social issues and are striving for change that is pioneered locally.

With this in mind, I embarked on my site assessment trip to Haiti with a very different perspective and intention than my previous international travels. The first stop on our trip was in Ft. Lauderdale, FL , where we met Sr. Marilyn, who lives in California and operates MBB in both Haiti and South Sudan. She introduced us to her story and illuminated details of the work she does with MBB. Her work in Haiti revolves around empowerment and opportunity for girls and women. Extreme poverty and corruption of the educational system prevent most children from obtaining a basic education. Most primary schools are private and, as such, require tuition as well as uniforms and books. Many families cannot afford to send their children to school or can only afford to send one child. In the latter case, most families opt to send boys rather than girls because males typically have greater opportunity for success than females in Haiti. As a result, most girls in Haiti only receive up to a 1st or 2nd grade level education. Sr. Marilyn and MBB attempt to ameliorate this disparity by providing secondary school scholarships, leadership development opportunities, and a safe and supportive living environment for girls who demonstrate academic potential. Additionally, MBB provides vocational and literacy training for young adult mothers and older women to develop skills such as reading, writing, computer skills, and baking. These skills provide women with greater independence and self-sufficiency and can even allow them to earn money through both formal and informal work.

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The following morning we took a short early morning flight from Ft. Lauderdale and landed in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The contrast between our departure and arrival city–only a quick two-hour flight apart–was profound. Destitution was apparent on our short drive from the airport out of the city. Litter filled the streets and empty plots of land and stray animals ran largely unmonitored throughout the city. Sr. Marilyn explained that, due to political and financial reasons, much of the rubble from the 2010 earthquake was never adequately disposed of in many of the poorer areas of the capital. As a result, many parts of the city appear recently destroyed even though the earthquake was seven years ago.

Our initial stay in Port-au-Prince was short as our first destination was Gros Morne, about a five-hour drive north of the city. Gros Morne, a town of about 35,000 people, is the community that MBB primarily serves in Haiti. Following the earthquake in 2010, Sr. Marilyn noticed that many relief efforts developed in Port-au-Prince but much fewer resources made their way out of the city and into the more rural parts of the country. She understood that her vision for MBB in Haiti had its limitations and saw the most potential for change in a smaller community.

Our time spent in Gros Morne and the surrounding area was quick but powerful. To gain insight into the MBB’s operations and its community impact, we met with several partners and individuals associated with the organization. We were able to meet several of the girls who are a part of the educational program as well as their families and see the personal impact that MBB has on their lives and their future. We interviewed the principal of a primary school that hosts several of the MBB students; he had high praise for the organization, stating that many, if not all, of the students would be unable to afford their school dues if it wasn’t for the support of MBB. On our final day in Gros Morne we also met with Sr. Jackie, a missionary sister who has worked in Haiti for almost two decades. She provided insight into the corruption in the Haitian political and educational systems. She explained that the private school system is largely unregulated, meaning almost anyone can start a school. This inhibits children from receiving a high-quality education and prevents those students who have the potential to succeed academically from actually achieving success. Overall, these interviews and personal interactions further highlighted the need for an organization like MBB in Haiti.

Sr. Marilyn embodies the spirit of the Opus Prize and models many of the Opus values, including Sustainable Change, Faith, and a Life of Service. She understands that long-term transformation is driven from within, not purely from her work, and this is what directs her vision for MBB. Through empowerment and leadership training of the girls she sponsors, employment opportunities for the local people, and a conscious effort to have Haitian and South Sudanese representation on her Board of Directors, she demonstrates a continued commitment to sustainable change in these countries. A woman humble in both stature and personality, she demonstrates her love and passion for her work in Haiti and South Sudan through her relentless work. I was most impressed by her ability to understand the needs of the communities she works with, while also maintaining a realistic expectation of how many people one person and one organization such as MBB can effectively impact. Although her work may be relatively small in the scope of the vast corruption and poverty in Haiti and South Sudan, her heart is big, and it shines through in both her actions and words.

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When Should You Take the National Physical Therapy Exam?

Name: Lindsay Mayors, PT, DPT, Graduated Class of 2017
Current Employment: Physical Therapist at KidSPOT Pediatric Therapies
Professional Goals:
to empower every child that I encounter to discover their vast abilities and reach their greatest potential, become a clinical instructor, and become a Pediatric Certified Specialist

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So, you’re a third year DPT student ready to graduate this upcoming May. The question is looming: when should you take the National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE): April or July? Lindsay Mayors, recent graduate, is here to give you a guide to deciding on when to take the NPTE.

Deciding when to take the NPTE is no easy task. If you are a third year student reading this and if you’re anything like I was at this time last year, your mind has felt like a teeter-totter repeatedly bouncing between April and July ever since you took the NPTE prep course at Regis. If your mind is on that teeter-totter at this point, take a deep breath and know that you do not have to make a decision right now. Now is the time to recognize all that you have accomplished in the classroom over the past two years, enjoy your last few days with your amazing classmates, embrace the uncertainties that undoubtedly come with the start of your final clinical rotations, and go out and enjoy those golden aspen leaves! Once you settle into your clinical (which, I promise, you ARE ready for), you can jump on that teeter-totter again with a clearer mindset.  The good news is that there is no right or wrong answer. It just takes a little bit of what Regis instills in us best…you guessed it…self-reflection!

There are 4 dates every year to take the NPTE; they are in January, April, July, and October.

I was one of the few in my class who chose to test in July. My fourth clinical was finally in the setting of my dreams: pediatrics! It’s a niche field of PT that is not heavily emphasized in the curriculum. For me, the thought of going home after clinic and studying for the NPTE did not stand a chance against going home and studying up on all things peds! My ultimate goal was to work in pediatrics, so I wanted to absorb all of the information I could during that rotation without spreading myself too thin between additional obligations. This decision allowed me to be fully prepared and present every day to each child; this is now something I highly attribute to the reason I was offered a position at that clinic.

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I traveled to Belize after graduation without allowing any NPTE thoughts to enter my mind.  When I returned, the 6-week journey of studying several hours/day began. Were there times over the summer that I was tired of studying and wished I had gotten it over with in April?  Of course. But were there times that I was thankful that I had un-interrupted time to study while maintaining a balanced lifestyle? Absolutely. Channeling my energy to be thankful for the process and reminding myself that it would be over in 6 weeks brought be back to my center. And those 6 weeks flew! A few days after receiving the results, I saw my very first pediatric patient independently. My mentoring PT signed off on all of my notes until my license number came through 5 weeks later. And here I am now, writing a blog post (instead of documenting on today’s PT sessions), still in disbelief that I have been a practicing PT for two months already!

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Here are some questions to consider during your decision-making process:

1. In what setting is your final clinical rotation?

 

Is it a setting in which you already have a high level of confidence, or is it a setting in which you have had minimal experience and may require additional preparation and study time?

2. What is your ideal study set-up?

Group study or individual study? Shorter bouts dispersed over a long period of time, or longer bouts concentrated in a shorter period of time? If the latter sounds better, maybe waiting until after graduation to settle into the rhythm of studying is for you.

3. What other tasks/activities/obligations do you have outside of clinical?

Research presentations, working on completing your capstone, finishing you clinical in-service presentation, family events, hobbies, weekend trips, etc. all will impact your ability to study–make sure to consider your time available from all angles.

4. Considering #2 and #3, what will set you up best to maintain a healthy life balance during your NPTE preparation?

Think about what’s realistic for you to accomplish.

5. Additional factors you may consider: travel and finances!

If you are planning on traveling after graduation, will you be able to relax and enjoy yourself if you still have to take the exam in July?

You should also consider:

  • If you want to take the exam in July, but feel it is financially necessary to begin working as soon as possible…
  • Does the state in which you plan to work allow you to practice under a provisional license while you study?
  • Does the setting in which you hope to work allow you to begin working in the time period between passing the exam and obtaining your license number? (~4-6 weeks is typical).

TIP: In general, it is more likely that a larger healthcare system will require a license number than a private practice.

The bottom line is, no matter what decision you make, there may be “the grass is greener on the other side” thoughts that arise. There may be doubts. There may be teeter-totters and remaining questions even after you decide on your test date. This is why I encourage you to consider what would be best for your own well-being. When answering the 5 questions above, consider your personal pros and cons. Reach out to your advisors, mentors, and classmates to assist you in the decision. Most importantly, make sure to have fun and create positive energies around your studies, no matter if they are for the April or July exam.

 

 

5 Ways to Make Your Summer Last Longer

Name: Evan Piché, Class of 2018
Undergrad:
 Colorado State University
Graduate: 
Masters in Public Policy
Fun Fact: 
I’m an ordained minister (thanks, Universal Life Church).
Hometown:
Holyoke, MA

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The air is starting to get crisper, your neighbors are raking the first leaves into huge piles that just beg to be jumped into, Instagram posts contain things like #pumpkinspice, and–of course–decorative gourds are beginning to make their annual appearance on countertops everywhere. Soon we will perform the yearly ritual of enjoying one extra hour of sleep in exchange for enduring six months of perpetual darkness.

Lamentably, summer is drawing to a close. Skiers and snowboarders are understandably stoked. But even football fans and snow-sport enthusiasts must acknowledge the bittersweet mood that accompanies the changing of seasons as we collectively bid farewell to flip-flops, sundresses, grilling, swimming, drinking margaritas on the porch, and falling asleep in a hammock. If you are like me—still wearing sandals and denying the inevitability of winter—or you just want to make the most of these final few precious days of summer-like weather (while also avoiding adult responsibility), you will find the following tips useful:

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#pumpkinspice

1. Watch the Sunset with a Beverage

This is self-explanatory. The sun typically sets in the west (if you’re directionally challenged, and reside in the Front Range, look towards the mountains) sometime between 7:00 o’clock and it’s-way-too-early-for-it-to-be-dark-already o’clock. Sunsets pair well with beer. The type/brand of beer doesn’t matter so much; just about any beer will taste good when enjoyed outdoors. Can or bottle? Doesn’t matter. Actually, the beer isn’t even the important part; this will work with Coke, or tea, or V8 juice, or whatever. The important part is the sunset.

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Sunset-beers with anatomy lab group

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Enjoying sunset-beers in Zion

2. “Food Poisoning”

Autumn is a great time to stay home sick with “that gnarly stomach bug that’s been going around” and go do something fun outside (*Editor’s note: for the responsible student, skip to #3). It’s starting to get dark earlier and earlier with each passing day; you can’t realistically be expected to go mountain biking after class when the sun sets at 4pm. I can’t condone faking sick, but if you do decide to head up to the mountains for a hike instead of going to class, make sure your fabricated illness is embarrassing/gross enough that no one will dare question you. Food poisoning is a personal favorite—it’s extremely common, utterly plausible, and no one likes to ask probing questions about that kind of stuff.

Bonus Tip: The phrase “it’s coming out both ends” and adjectives like “explosive” and “violent” should be sprinkled in liberally as they will lend credibility to your story. This is important to ensure that the legitimacy of your “illness” will not be questioned. Fall is a great time to hike to Bierstadt Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park while recovering from your unfortunate gastrointestinal distress.

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Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park

 

3. Ride Your Bike to Nowhere in Particular…But Make Sure to Get Ice Cream While You Do It

Perhaps you can’t justify skipping class (*responsible students, continue reading here). Fair enough. Maybe an afternoon of avoiding studying and reconnecting with your childhood is more your level of procrastination. Have you ever ridden your bike to Sweet Cow at 2:00 pm to “study?” No?! Try it sometime! After stuffing your face, spend an hour or so just cruising around the block on your bike and embrace that feeling of being twelve again.

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High Lonesome Trail in Nederland, CO

4. Camp

Myth: camping season runs from Memorial Day Weekend to Labor Day Weekend.

Fact: those are actually the starting and ending dates of white-pants-wearing season for people who own white pants.

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Camping in Zion

5. Drive Around with Your Windows Rolled Down While Doing That Airplane Thing with Your Hand

How many hours did you spend driving around this summer with the windows down, blasting 90’s Hip-Hop/Dixie Chicks and pretending your hand is an airplane? Quite clearly, you did not spend an adequate amount of time engaging in this activity. Today, after class, hop in your car, crank up the stereo to that obnoxiously loud volume that makes things in your car vibrate and take a drive to absolutely nowhere.

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Cruising around (and climbing) in Crested Butte, CO

Since the author is approaching 30, and therefore not “hip” to what the “kids” are grooving to these days, I will suggest a few classic summer anthems that are sure to enhance the stoke level:

-I Believe I Can Fly – R. Kelly (pre-weirdness)
-Wide Open Spaces – The Dixie Chicks
-Born to Run – Bruce Springsteen
-Boys of Summer – Eagles
-Milkshake – Kelis
-Pretty much anything by Prince, David Bowie, or Snoop-Dog/Lion

These are only suggestions. I encourage you to be imaginative and creative in your recreational procrastination.

Let’s Talk About Mental Health

Name: Amanda Rixey, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Kansas, KS
Hometown: Overland Park, KS
Fun Fact: My massive bear dog, Sherlock, has over 7,000 followers on Instagram.

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I think most of my classmates would view me as the hyper, kind-of goofy, and giggly one in the class.  It’s easy for me to hide under that personality— especially after having suffered from generalized anxiety and PTSD.  Both inside and outside of PT school, mental health is my passion.  In 2012, I lost my dad to suicide; ever since, awareness and treatment of mental health has been the biggest thing I’ve ever advocated for.  Mental health and physical therapy go hand-in-hand.  However, mental health issues can sort of creep up on you as a busy physical therapy student when you least expect it.

There are days when I never want to get out of bed.  There are days when I come home from school and all I do is lie in bed.  There are days when I don’t study because I’m too nervous about not knowing all of the material for school.  There are days when all I do is study because I’m nervous I don’t know enough.  Regardless of the day, I have to keep reminding myself I am not crazy.  Graduate school is stressful and it is normal to have these feelings of anxiety.  The biggest key, however, is to seek help and do something about it.


Here is my list of how I “keep calm and carry on” during PT school:

1. Get help when you need it

The longer you wait to seek medical guidance, the harder it will be.  I sought out a counselor and take medications for my anxiety and depression.  Regis is awesome and offers free counseling to students—take advantage of it!

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Sharing hugs and thoracic manipulations during MMII lab

2. Don’t be afraid to take medications if that’s what’s right for you

I take an SSRI every day. I find that there is some sort of stigma regarding medicating for depression and anxiety. Overcoming this stigma allowed me to experience life to the fullest for the first time. Talk to your primary care physician or counselor; they can help.

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Spending Thanksgiving with the Class of 2018 and our puppies

3. Find a network of support

 Be open with classmates, professors, family members, friends, or even your dog about what you’re going through.  Let them know when you feel anxious or down and talk to them about it.  I text my friends when I don’t feel like myself.  They are there to help.

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My sisters and friend at the University of Kansas Out of the Darkness Suicide Prevention Walk with AFSP where I served as Chairperson in May 2014

4. Take days off from schoolwork

I know that school can seem overwhelming, but it is acceptable to take one or two days off during the week for yourself.  Do what you love: workout, hike, do some Pilates, lay on the sofa and watch Bridesmaids for the 50th time, walk your dog!

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Enjoying a beautiful day off in Vail with my best buddy, Sherlock and my boyfriend, Joe (not pictured)

5. Get involved in the community  

Through Regis, I was able to get involved with Spoke n Motion, an integrated dance company.  Sharing my experience with dancers of diverse backgrounds helped me feel wanted in a very close community and enjoy dance from a beautiful perspective.

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Dancing with my fellow Spokes during our May 2016 show at the Colorado Ballet. PC: Spoke N Motion

6. Believe in yourself

When I doubt my abilities in school, I notice that I often find myself in a rut.  Accept what you know and what you don’t know.  Cherish the moments your classmates compliment you and when you succeed.  These little moments add up and you will realize that you are a capable student in this profession.

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Enjoying a Friday night with classmates

7. Remember that mental health doesn’t have to take over your life

Taking the proper steps and finding the right help will put you on the pathway to overcoming it. Please feel free to email me with any questions at arixey@regis.edu.


If you or someone you know needs help contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK

Regis Counseling Services: 303-458-3507

 

How to Avoid Burnout in PT School

 

Name: Brad Fenter, Class of 2019
Undergrad: University of Texas at Tyler, TX
Hometown: Vernon, TX
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Burnout is an interesting thing, mainly because it only happens with things that we love. No one gets burned out on things we hate or even things we just feel a little “meh” about. The concept that we no longer want to be around or indulge in something we love is very unsettling . No one has ever gotten burned out on onions; no one loves onions. We tolerate them and can even enjoy them, but love them? No. And if you’re thinking to yourself, “I love onions!” Then you’re most likely an alien trying—unsuccessfully—to assimilate with human society.

No, burnout is only possible with something we love. For me, I love Clif Bars—specifically the white chocolate macadamia flavor. If you think another flavor is better, that’s completely fine. Just know I’ll be judging you until the end of time. Unfortunately for me and my love of Clif Bars, I went on a backpacking trip a few years ago with an entire case in tow. Every day I crammed those delicious little bars in my face until, one day, I just couldn’t eat them anymore. I wanted to eat them, but I just could not do it. I was burned out.

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My sadness is palpable.

After the trip, I had just one bar left and it has stayed in my pack as a sad, dilapidated reminder of what once was. I want you to learn from my mistakes and avoid burnout. Since this is a PT blog, here are 3 ways to ensure your time in PT school does not become a macadamia Clif Bar.

1. Pace Yourself

This is most important for when you’re first starting out in PT school. That first semester you tell yourself you’re going to read all the textbooks, watch all the online videos, and take excellent notes. If you do everything at top gear, you’ll be out of gas by October. Then what will you do? There are approximately…all of the semesters left at this point. Instead, take the time to learn good study habits and you won’t have to worry when you feel a little fatigued halfway through a semester.

When we discuss long commitments, the analogy of a marathon is always used: “Remember it’s a marathon, not a sprint!” When I ran my marathon, though, it took only part of 1 day and I was finished by noon. To contrast, PT school is 8 semesters—which is around 3 years—which equates to…A lot of days. A better saying would be, “Remember it’s a 3-year commitment.” It may seem long right now, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s not a long time. If you start with the right pacing in mind, then you will be better off. Do not be the brightest star for the first month only to flame out spectacularly for the next 32 months.

Had I paced myself a little better, Clif Bars and I would still be going steady and I would have my first love second love. My wife, of course, is my first love (as the bruise on my ribs proves after writing that previous sentence).

2. Get Involved (but not too much)

This point may seem to run counter to my previous one, but it will all make sense in the end (just like neuroscience except for the sense-making part). There are many opportunities to get involved with things outside of the main curriculum. You can run for a position as class officer, you can be a part of the puppy program, you can join a student interest group. You can go to conferences (quite handy since some of them are required, anyways) and get to know practicing PTs. All of these things are important. Getting involved in more than just schoolwork can remind you of why you started PT school in the first place.

The way I stay involved with my classmates is through Ultimate Frisbee. If there’s a pickup game going on after class, I’m there. I get to interact and stay engaged with my classmates outside of the lab or lecture hall; it’s great. I enjoy the exercise, competition, and group aspect of the whole thing. But all of those other things I listed before? I do exactly NONE of those things because I’m antisocial and don’t like new situations. Now, that may sound like the ramblings of an angry old man who wasn’t hugged enough as a child, but it is actually a larger part of my point. I have time to play a pick-up game of Ultimate Frisbee and enjoy a drink at the brewery afterwards. I don’t have time to attend the fellowship meeting after class, play frisbee, participate in the puppy program, volunteer to pass out flyers at commencement, and also do well on my finals.

You may be thinking, “I can do all of those things and still be successful!”

Is it possible to do? From a strictly physical standpoint, sure. If you want to end up like this:

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The point is not that all of these things are impossible. But, you will be drained by the end of each semester—just in time for finals.

3. Keep Perspective

This is, I believe, the most important point. I put it last to weed out the unworthy people who get scared of words milling about in groupings of greater than 140 characters. Now that they are gone, we can discuss the most important tool we possess to avoid burnout.

Perspective goes both directions in time. It’s important to remember the future we are working towards as practicing clinicians, but it is also important to see where we came from. If I were not in PT school I would still be plugging away at my old job with little satisfaction and a feeling that there is something more I could be doing. Anytime I feel a little down on myself, I think about how stressed I was beforehand; this serves as great motivation for the present. If you’re one of those young folks and have not had a previous career, then your perspective should be forward. Most people in life will never have the opportunity to work in such a fulfilling field as physical therapy or even get into PT school! When we zoom out from our studies, case assignments, skill checks, and lab practicals, we can see just how great we really have things.

You may be thinking, “I know this is important! But how do I actually accomplish this?” My most important tool for keeping perspective is to prioritize time for myself. Whenever a day is available, I will try to get outside and hike. Or bike. Or camp. Really, anything outside will do. Even when it’s just a weekend and there are exams on Monday, I will take a long bike ride to a coffee shop to study. That way I get to study with the addition of sunshine and exercise thrown in. If you hate all of these things for some unfathomable reason, there’s still hope for you. Maybe you like going to the movies or reading books. That’s great. Make time to do those things because if you do, you will be more successful.

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Making time for myself on a hike to Handies Park

 

For me, outdoor activities allow me to see the wider world and keep perspective on how insignificant many of the major stressors in my life really are. Regis’ DPT program is very good at pushing you to the edge and then pulling back just in time. But what happens when you feel like you’re going over the edge? What happens when you feel you’re on the road to burnout? Do you have the tools to pull back from the bleary-eyed, emotionally drained abyss? If you can pace yourself and get involved (but not too much) and keep perspective, you will be better equipped to avoid burnout. Remember, life doesn’t get easier once we are done with school, but this experience will prepare us to handle the difficulties that come our way.

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Here’s me, fellow student David Cummins, and more friends after tackling another one of life’s difficulties

 

Regis PT Students Run the Boston Marathon

Three Regis DPT students put aside their studies for a weekend and ran the Boston Marathon.  Congratulations to Jenna Carlson (3:43:44), Lauren Hill (3:06:06) and Nolan Ripple (2:49:29) for racing and representing our program! 


 

Name: Nolan Ripple, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Portland, OR
Hometown: Peoria, AZ
Fun Fact: Lacrosse player freshly converted to marathon enthusiast.

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Some History on the Boston Marathon:

The Boston Marathon is one of those things that runners dream about.  The legacy, culture, international diversity, and enthusiasm that it brings are bar-none top in the world for marathons.  The Boston Marathon is the oldest continuing running marathon in the world, with its debut in 1897.  On April 17 2017, I was fortunate enough to run in the 121st running of this prestigious event.  For a little background, there are qualifying times for each age group in order to partake.  In my own age group, males 18-34 years old, the cut-off times for selection were 3 hours, 2 minutes, 51 seconds.  That comes out to be just about 6:59 pace/mile for 26.2 miles.  Rigorous qualifying standards are one of the chief reasons why this race holds so much honor.

This was also the 50th year celebrating women running in the race.  The first woman to do so, Kathrine Switzer, was 20 years old when she ran and completed the Boston Marathon.  It’s an interesting story: she had to register under the name “K.V. Switzer” to feign a guy’s name, in order to receive a race bib.  And during the race, a Boston Athletic official tried to rip the bib off of her, but she kept running.  Eventually, she finished the race, and started a tradition of males and females competing each year in this run.  It’s the spirit that Kathrine had that inspires runners from all nations today.


I was a lax bro in undergrad, but a concussion my senior year made me decide it was time to be a Forest Gump for my last year college. Completing a marathon was my first official running goal, and I did that in May 2015 with a time of 3:25:32.  Shortly after, I set my sights on Boston, and worked my butt off to achieve a qualifying time in my next marathon—Phoenix 2016 with 3:01:59, and then Eugene 2016 at 2:55:44. Going to Boston was a dream—namely because it was the first big goal I had set for myself.  My marathon buddy, also conveniently named Nolan, was going to be running with me.  In addition, both of our families were there (shout out to my Crazy Aunt Cathy).  I scored big: a trip to Boston, time off of school, and my dad with his credit card to pay for everything out there!

Boston itself is worth another story.  Great place, amazing people, and awesome food.  Ask Leigh Dugan (’18) if you have further Boston questions.

Fast-forward to Race Day: April 17th.  I had to wake up bright and early to get shuttled from Boston out to Hopkinton because the race is a one-way shot starting in a suburb west of the city.  Upon arriving, there is a massive Athletes’ Village with bananas, bagels, coffee, Gatorade, water, and some tents to relax under.  I had been on an intentional 3-day coffee withdrawal, so the buzz was about to get real.  Thousands of people were shuttling in, and in total, 30,000 runners went through that village.  I met up with Lauren Hill (Class of 2017), and she hooked me up with some pre-workout gum and extra gels (aka liquid play-doh).  We chilled out at the tent for a bit, and then made our way on the .7 mile walk to the start line.  Love how we get to walk .7 miles to the start line pre-marathon… Not like I’m worried about hitting my daily FitBit goal.  I got to my corral, hit the bathroom like 4 times, and then joined a mob of skinny freaks like me in the gate.  Luckily, I was in Corral 2 of Wave 1, so I got in there early and all comfy with my fellow strangers.  We also got to watch the “elites” walk by, who are basically Olympian super-humans.

 

Fast-forward to Race Day: April 17th.  I had to wake up bright and early to get shuttled from Boston out to Hopkinton because the race is a one-way shot starting in a suburb west of the city.  Upon arriving, there is a massive Athletes’ Village with bananas, bagels, coffee, Gatorade, water, and some tents to relax under.  I had been on an intentional 3-day coffee withdrawal, so the bfuzz was about to get real.  Thousands of people were shuttling in, and in total, 30,000 runners went through that village.  I met up with Lauren Hill (Class of 2017), and she hooked me up with some pre-workout gum and extra gels (aka liquid play-doh).  We chilled out at the tent for a bit, and then made our way on the .7 mile walk to the start line.  Love how we get to walk .7 miles to the start line pre-marathon… Not like I’m worried about hitting my daily FitBit goal.  I got to my corral, hit the bathroom like 4 times, and then joined a mob of skinny freaks like me in the gate.  Luckily, I was in Corral 2 of Wave 1, so I got in there early and all comfy with my fellow strangers.  We also got to watch the “elites” walk by, who are basically Olympian super-humans.

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Lauren Hill (’17) and Nolan Ripple (’18) share a picture before their race

The gun went off at 10:00, and we were under way.  The first 3 miles are almost impossible to pass, because it’s like an endless herd of cattle running to the feeding lot.  It’s also mostly downhill and flat for the first 5-10 miles, so 99% of runners go out too fast and have it come back to haunt them later.  At mile 5 it’s really hard to know how you’re going to feel at 25—pro tip.  It was also a really warm day for running.  The course started at 74 and sunny, which may sound perfect.  But when you’re depleting your body of water and electrolytes for 26+ miles, you’d rather have it 20 degrees cooler.  Anyways, you can’t bitch because it’s part of the fun, and a race is never perfect.  I digress, so back to the race! I’m sitting at a nice pace, feeling good, when I realize we’re running by the Wellesley College girls somewhere around mile 13.  It’s an extraordinary stretch of girls that are holding signs asking for all sorts of things, and a probable drop out point for single males.  I gave some high fives, laughed a bit, blew some kisses, and kept jamming.  Shortly after, I ran by a group that I presume to be Boston University students, which I would like to call the “Booze Tunnel.”  It was about 11:30 am, but 5 o’clock for this rowdy bunch.  I considered taking a celeb-shot on the Beer Pong table, but worried that I’d be left dusted by the Chilean dude running next to me.  Somewhere around mile 15 or 16, my GI system decided to implode, kinda like a Michael Bay film.  I found the nearest porta potty, deciding losing a couple minutes was better than dealing with a disaster situation.  Back on course after that though.  I decided Espresso Gu’s wouldn’t be the fuel of source anymore, because I’d end up comatose in a porta potty for sure.  So I took an endurance gum this time.  It gave quite the kick, and got me rolling again up to Heartbreak Hill.

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At the hill, I saw Tiffany (Class of 2018) and Mike who were cheering loudly.  Mike had a beer for me, but I had to politely pass (hopefully the only time I say no to a beer ever again).  Going up Heartbreak Hill was challenging, but I knew flats and downhills followed to the finish.  I popped another endurance gum in around mile 21 and kept going.  At this point, you just keep trying to put one foot in front of the other, because all joints start to hurt.  I always wonder if this is what old age is like. The last 5 miles of the course were completely packed with spectators; this was incredible.  I had an American flag on a stick that I kept with me all race (not sure why still), but people loved it.  Coming down the final corner on Boylston street, I saw my family and family friends… alas!  I was in a mental limbo of ecstasy and fatigue, but passing them was the final fuel for me to finish.  They are all amazing!  I came across that final stretch thinking of all the friends, family, colleagues, teachers, and strangers who have supported me in running, and in life altogether.  I had tears in my eyes when I finished, not from pain, but joy, gratitude, and humility.

If you have read this far, you are one of those people I am talking about.  The support you guys have given me is UNREAL.  This was more than a race to me, it was about setting a goal, working hard, and having others propel me towards a dream.  I lived that dream on April 17, 2017.  I finished in 2:49:29, which was a PR for me.  I have many more goals now set, but this was a big one.  I run because I love it, and I love to compete.  Boston gave me both.

Passion and persistence are two tenants I strive to live by.  Finding a passion, and pursuing it are two staples that I cling close to.  It’s easy to be passionate about something for a week, two weeks, or even a year.  But keeping the same drive day in and day out is a bear.  People saw the last 26.2 miles of training, but not the 1,500 miles that preceded it.

This whole experience was so rewarding because I saw 30,000 other people pursuing something similar to me, and that fire that comes with running.  It’s an art, an expression of oneself.  Others find it in different ways, whether it be in their profession, other hobbies, or relationships they build with others.  It’s amazing to see what’s possible when you love something, and when so many other people go out of their way to support you on that journey.  I love you all for being the kindling to my fire.  Thank you!!!


 

Name: Jenna (Carlson) Jarvis, Class of 2017
Undergrad: Boise State University
Hometown: Broomfield, CO
Fun Fact: My personal record in the mile is a 5:09, but I still would really like to go sub-5 someday.

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Boston is a one of a kind race. Beyond the prestige associated with running one of the few US marathons that requires a qualifying time, everyone told me that people would be cheering me on the entire 26.2 miles and the magic of the race would carry me.  They were right.

The race starts off with you and your closest 7,000 similarly paced friends, standing too close for comfort in a small coral, waiting for that gun to go off.  When it finally does go off, don’t expect to actually start: it will take a while for everyone in front of you to start moving!  The next few miles are still crowded with people running a similar pace, guiding you along to the pace you should be running when you want to hurry down the hills.  The remainder of the race follows the roads of different towns going toward Boston; they’re all lined with cheering fans and accessorized with an insane number of volunteers handing out hundreds of cups of water and police officers and military personal ensuring you are safe.

When people told me there would be people cheering the entire course, I thought they were exaggerating.  They were not.  It is one of the most incredible and exhilarating things I have experienced in a race.  Within each town, there were hundreds of people that line the streets, screaming, holding signs, handing out orange slices and water bottles, and giving you all the encouragement you could possibly need from a crowd.

One of my favorite parts of the race was around mile 13 in Wellesley, MA, home to Wellesley College.  Here, the enthusiasm and energy of the college students was even higher than the previous crowds; I got a big boost of energy, purely because these women looked like they are having so much fun cheering people on and it reminded me that I should be having fun, too!

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The thing I loved the most about running the Boston marathon, however, was the incredible people running the race.  The elites run the marathon in incredible times, but I can’t help but be amazed by what can be done by the rest of us 40,000 mortals.  The energy at the starting line is so supportive and exciting.  Then, as the course drags on and on and as people are getting more and more exhausted, there was (if possible) even more encouragement given to each other. A man came up to me around mile 11 and asked how I was doing.  I lied and told him I was doing alright, and he replied that he was having a hard time with the heat.  I told him he would get through and be fine and he told me the same; this little act of encouragement and kindness meant so much to me.  I saw athletes with amputations and in wheelchairs powering up hills, and it inspired me to keep pushing on when I was hurting because they were probably working harder and hurting more.  I saw runners helping others who were delirious from exhaustion.  I saw some runners carry a woman across the finish line when her legs were no longer willing to carry her.  How can you not be inspired by these people and the incredible things they do for each other?

The race I ran was not what I had wanted.  It was certainly the hardest, most painful race I have ever run.  As a PT student, very often our clinicals, boards, and life take precedence over training (as they rightfully should!). Those things took a much larger toll on me and my training than I thought and would have liked.  Even so, I gave everything I had out on that course that day, and for that I am happy.  Overall, the Boston Marathon did not disappoint.

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April Recap: 3rd Annual Talent Show

April is one of the busiest months for PT students! Whether it’s your first or last year, it’s a time of studying, planning your future, and–of course–a time to get to know your classmates even better.

First and Second Years:

Somehow, between all of the practicals, midterms and class, our first and second years had time to come together for the 3rd Annual Talent Show! It was a refreshing reminder that we’re more than just students: we all have other talents and interests that keep us fresh and focused in the classroom.  There was both a performance and visual arts competition; prizes included gift cards to REI (we are in Colorado, of course!) and tickets for a whitewater rafting trip, to a TEDx weekend, and to Cirque du Soleil!

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Special thanks to:

Organizers: Kimi Bengochea and Michael Young

MC: Michael Young

Team: Lydia Hamstra, Brianna Henggeler, Ashley King, and Rachel Maass

Funding: Dave Law, the Director of Student Activities

Watch the talent show in its entirety online! 

Part 1 * Part 2Part 3 * Part 4 * Part 5 *

Third Years: 

The third years wrapped up their LAST clinical rotation, most took the NPTE (fingers crossed!), and now they are presenting their capstone and research presentations before graduation next weekend. Congrats, almost grads!

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Some third years (and other SPTs and PTs) finishing off their 3-month clinical with their advisor, Shelene Thomas (left)

Blogger: Carol Passarelli

How to Conquer Time Management

Name: Sarina Tamura, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Colorado at Boulder
Hometown: Aurora, CO
Fun Fact: I won 2nd place at the World Cup Stacking Championships in 5th grade!

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Sarina is a full-time student and competitive dancer

You dance. Why?

My life has always been an endless mixtape of dynamic tracks. Two days after graduating from CU Boulder in 2014, I started work as a full-time PT aide, travelled Europe for 3 weeks the day after moving on from that position, and returned home literally the day before I started PT school.

My childhood was no different. I was completely engulfed with dance, gymnastics, and the violin. I trained in both dance disciplines (dance styles including ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, and Irish) from age 3 until 13, then I decided to pursue gymnastics instead. I competed, coached, and judged until I tore my ACL at 17, then returned to dance, where I fell in love with hip-hop and breaking. It seems like my life is perpetually skipping from one track to the next.

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I normally hesitate to tell people that I’m a breakdancer because I feel that breakdancing has a great deal of negative stereotypes associated with it. We aren’t “hood,” we don’t live on the streets, we aren’t violent and aggressive people, and no, we don’t all spin on our heads. It’s actually quite the opposite–the hip-hop culture is all about peace, love, unity, and having fun. In fact, I’ve met some of the most influential people through the world of dance and have brothers and sisters all over the world now thanks to this culture. Dance has provided me with so many cool opportunities that I could have never imagined. For instance, I’ve opened for the Jabbawockeez, performed for the NCAA Final Four Opening Ceremony, performed at the Buell Theater, and performed/competed nationally and internationally in Japan. Not to mention, I get to travel all the time with my closest friends!

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Sarina competed in Japan over the winter break

What does your typical week look like?

I wake up at 5:30 and leave the house by 6:30. I commute to Regis from SE Aurora (roughly 45min-1hr commute) so I try to beat the morning traffic. Having a long commute is both a curse and a blessing: it forces me to get to school early and study before class, yet it’s also my ideal time to listen to music and relax. After classes, I stay at school to study until it’s time to teach and/or practice in the evening. I teach 3 days/week at 2 dance studios and teach privates some weekends (this is how I manage to fund my dance travels). I usually practice 4 days/week for 2-3 hours per session. I get home around 10 or 11, fit in some more studying, then repeat it all again the next day.

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Sarina in Downtown Denver

While being out all day sounds exhausting, it forces me to be productive. It prevents me from taking naps, watching movies, and snacking on junk food – all things I would probably do if I were home. I typically compete or perform almost every weekend (some months are busier than others). I sometimes get hired to perform at events and that brings in some extra cash, which always helps. I’m a weekend warrior in that I take short weekend trips to competitions quite often, so studying on planes have become a regular requirement. It can be exhausting, but it’s super rewarding. On weekends that I’m not out of town, I like to leave Sundays open for studying, spending time with family, or going hiking/snowboarding. While this is what my typical week looks like, I often have to make sacrifices to study (this was especially true during the rigorous 1st year!). Having a schedule is important, but you also need to be open and flexible – things don’t always go as planned.

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Sarina with some of her Class of 2018 classmates

Being in PT school has made me realize the true value of time. Having so little free time encourages me to focus primarily on the people who are most important to me, and that’s been invaluable to my quality of life. My planner is my bible. I try to plan out my days in advance so that I accomplish everything that needs to get done. This is especially important on weekends that I’ll be competing or traveling so I don’t fall behind. Mental image training has also become a skill I’ve refined over the years; on the days that I just can’t make it to the studio, I can sit and choreograph or think of new combinations as a study break. I’ve found that mental practice can often be just as effective as physical practice.

What are the biggest tips you can give to an incoming DPT student?

  1. “I don’t have time” is just not an excuse—if something is important to you, you’ll make time for it. My biggest worry going into PT school was that I wouldn’t be able to dance anymore, but that didn’t end up being true at all. In fact, I’m entering more competitions and traveling more now than I ever have! (I actually counted out of curiosity and I’ve done 34 competitions/ performances since starting PT school–10 of which were out of state and 4 of which were international!) If anything, having a life outside of PT school and having dance as an outlet to relieve stress has been a huge asset. It’s nice having an identity outside of just being a physical therapy student.
  1. Learn to say “no.” This is also advice for myself because it’s something I still struggle with. There’ve been many times I agreed to do a gig or sub classes at the studio when I shouldn’t have and broke down because I was so overwhelmed. Life is all about balance. Always ask yourself what your priorities are. If it interferes with your priorities, say no. Respect your time and take care of yourself!

Now, granted, I’ve structured my life in a way that allows me to do all of these things. I’ve put dating aside for now to pursue my passions, and I don’t have a family to take care of unlike a lot of my classmates–so I have the freedom to live the lifestyle I do while still excelling in school. I can get burnt out and frustrated, but there’s nothing a little ice cream can’t fix! 😉 Structure your life in a way that works for you. PT school is tough, but it’s definitely doable. Pursue your passions and do the things that enrich your life. In this world full of temporary things, it’s a dangerous mentality to believe there’s always next time. It’s our last few years of being a student—it’s the best time to do whatever you want, so take advantage of it! Good luck!

 

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How to Find Your Work-Life Balance in PT School

Name: Tom Sears, Class of 2019
Undergrad: Wheeling Jesuit University
Hometown: Moundsvill, WV
Fun Fact: I once gave a ten minute impromptu (and decidedly silly) speech about apples for an undergraduate class.

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The ultimate question for me once I found the perfect PT school (Regis) was:

How do I balance the rigors of PT school with my family, friends, and all the responsibilities that accompany everyday life?

This is the question. So, what is the (your) answer?

Well, to begin… I am fortunate enough to be blessed with a beautiful wife, a dog and cat (the cat is temperamental and bites for no apparent reason), and a house (and the lovely mortgage and maintenance that goes along with it). Oh, and my wife and I are in the process of adopting a child! And, well, I have friends and hobbies and I even like to workout on a regular basis.

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My dog Rufus’ puppy graduation

So, how does one achieve this so-called balance? The most important piece of advice I can give you is to surround yourself with a good support system. Let your friends know that your life is changing (for the better) and you will need them to be patient with you. Ask them to check in with you on how studies are going, to celebrate with you when you do find the time (celebrate that anatomy lab practical being over!), to understand when you have to turn down their invite to try line dancing at the Grizzly Rose, and to be there when you need to decompress.

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Tom plays music with his brother to de-stress

My wife has been SO supportive of my endeavor, and for me this was imperative. Be sure your spouse or significant other is forewarned of the change that’s about to take place. If you don’t have an “other,” let your family and closest friends know. They likely cannot fully appreciate what the experience is like, but have this talk…Let them know you will need them by your side. You will be in school much of the day and studying more frequently than you ever have before. You won’t always be as available as you would like. Get them on board! And perhaps best of all, be prepared to meet some truly awesome new people. These are perhaps the only people in your life that will truly understand what this experience is like. You may be amazed to see how quickly you become close with your classmates. Lean on them!

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Service learning with my classmates

The other essential part of work-life balance: develop a routine—a routine that fits with your needs. This, of course, will be difficult to determine at first. But alas my young apprentice, it will come. This may mean planning your days out to allow for your studies or for time to relax/decompress. Think forward to your assignments that are due and allot enough time to finish them.

I have talked with 2nd and 3rd years (much wiser and more experienced than I) and for a few of these folks their answer revolved around boundaries and separation. They would arrive to school at 7 AM and leave at 5 or 6 PM. During this time they would study with absolute focus. You know, the kind that doesn’t involve watching Youtube clips, posting tweets, or watching a ball game in the background (okay—guilty as charged!). And when they came home, they were with their family and friends. Truly with them. This was not my answer, but it could be yours.

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Professional Ceremony with my family

My answer was not so easily developed at first. I have a dog at home who had not been out for 8+ hours, and thus I feel the need after class to return home to let my beloved furry friend out for a long walk. I then return to my studies before joining my family for a nice conversation and an episode of Game of Thrones.

Whatever your familial and personal needs are, plan accordingly and give time to them.

The next key to work-life balance: build into your routine a time for rest. Whether you’re parking your gluteus maximus, medius (and other various muscles) in your most comfortable seat to watch the weekly Steelers game, checking out one of the local breweries with your peers, or enjoying the wondrous outdoor activities that Colorado has to offer, find the mental and physical space you need to completely unplug from schoolwork.  No matter how much time you spend on studying, you may never feel like you are as on top of the material as you would like to be. But trust me: this time will refresh your mind, reinvigorate your resolve, and ultimately help you to perform optimally in PT school.

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Fireworks night with the Colorado Rockies!

Oh ya—and there is this thing called exercise. Chances are you’re a fan (or will at least be soon). Some of my peers elect to put this on the back burner. I would strongly suggest keeping exercise in your routine. For me, blasting some 1975, John Legend, or Tool and going for a run is the perfect way to clear my mind and prepare me for a night of studying.

It is well worth an hour of your time to keep your routine, practice what you preach, and prepare your mind not just to cram, but retain the material at hand. This will bring you closer to your future success as a PT.

Your routine may take time to develop, but that’s okay. If you had all the answers to achieving optimal balance for success in your new PT career right now, you would be the first! Be steadfast in your resolve and be flexible. Prioritize your needs and you will find your answer!

A Typical Day as a DPT Student in Colorado

Name: Alex Lubahn, Class of 2019
Hometown: Winona, MN
Undergrad: University of Minnesota
Fun Fact:I won my elementary school’s cursive handwriting contest 3 years in a row
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What to do in Colorado…such a simple question but so difficult to answer. Why? There are about a million different amazing things (give or take) to do in this beautiful state. Do you want to climb a mountain? Sure! Golden, CO has gorgeous hikes and views only a 15-minute drive away.

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Want to climb bigger mountains? Sure, a 90-minute drive and 9,000 feet up will bring you to the top of Mount Evans, one of Colorado’s 53 14’ers.

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Not into the outdoors? That’s all right because Denver’s city life has everything: breweries (154 of them), a botanical garden, a tremendous zoo, the historic Union Station, trampoline parks…Let’s be honest—what more could a person ask for?

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Since moving to Colorado for PT school, I cannot get enough of the outdoors. Although my first semester at Regis felt like I spent years in the library studying what the heck that brachial plexus thing consisted of, every study break I had, I was headed west to the mountains. As much work as school is, you have to give your brain a break; the outdoors is the best way for me to de-stress.  For me, it’s usually a toss up to decide if I want to go for a nice easy hike, climb a 14er, or camp up in the mountains.  It’s all unbelievably close and easy to access.

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Even in January when the weather gets a tad too chilly to hike, there is still fun to be had. With the cold comes snow, and with snow comes 30+ world-class skiing resorts (not to mention all the backcountry skiing opportunities).

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Although the mountain ski resorts are covered in 60+ inches of snow to play in in the winter, Denver still manages to bring warm weather blessings. At the start of the spring semester near the end of January, it was a ridiculous 62 degrees in Denver…yeah, sunny and 62 degrees?  I’m from Minnesota.  Imagine how I felt. 

Here’s my ideal weekend day in Colorado:

  1. Wake up bright and early
  2. Meet your half-asleep friends at Burrito Giant for a breakfast burrito before heading up to the mountains (Fun fact: Denver is basically the breakfast burrito capital of the world).
  3. After one of the most beautiful drives you’ll ever experience and the best tasting burrito you’ll ever eat, you arrive at the base of Mt. Bierstadt. The 14,065 foot mountain looks daunting as its peak pierces through the bright blue sky. The only thing you can think of is what the view will look like from the top.
  4. Hike! The fresh mountain air fills your lungs and with each step you can feel yourself getting closer to the summit.

Side note: hiking up the mountain is exhausting; remember that you’re a PT student and exercise is good for you, so suffer/enjoy your trek up the mountain.

  1. Make it to the top!

After crossing mountain streams and hiking through massive valleys, you’ve made it. The view at the summit makes you feel like you are on top of the world–an extremely unique and fulfilling feeling. 

  1. You whip out that delicious peanut butter and jelly sandwich you artfully prepared at 6:30 that morning and enjoy the majesty that is the Rocky Mountains. I can’t think of many things better than awesome views and even more awesome classmates to share them with.
  2. After soaking in the beauty for a bit it’s time to head down the mountain.
  3. Finish off the day with a short (or long) stop at the Crooked Stave Brewery back in Denver!

There you go: a beautiful (and typical) day in Colorado.

I cannot express how blessed I am to be a part of such an amazing school in such an amazing place; I look forward to all of the adventures yet to come!      

Move Forward 5K/10K Recap

Move Forward 2016 (September 17, 2016) was a huge success! We had 261 runners signed up for the event and raised over $7,000 for Canine for Companions and The Foundation for Physical Therapy. A sincere thank you to all of our volunteers, runners, and sponsors for making this event amazing.  If you have any questions, suggestions, or would like to be involved in next year’s race please email us at moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com.

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Our beautiful sign made by Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson!

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Fastest Faculty Awards go to Andy and Amy.

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Our service dog Takia, making sure we don’t forget who we are raising money for…

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A few racers/volunteers enjoying some yoga after the race.

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Post-Run Fun!

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Our Couch to 5K team did amazing this year! Next year, maybe a 5K to 10K team?

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No one asked Matt (Class of 2017) to dress up, but that is just how great this man is…

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Class of 2017’s Move Forward Team; great job, everyone! The Class of 2018 has some big shoes to fill…

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We can’t wait for the start of next year’s race!

 

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Ryan Bourdo, co-director of Move Forward, graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo.

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Teaching Fitness Classes While in School

Name: Morgan Pearson, Class of 2017

Hometown: Gillette, WY

Undergrad: University of Wyoming

Fun Fact: I teach a fitness class called POUND…no, I’m not joking. Let me tell you more…

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What the heck is POUND?

You may have read a blog post a couple of months ago that highlighted my teaching a fitness class to some of my fellow classmates called “POUND.” It’s a super fun cardio/strengthening workout that I absolutely love teaching! If you want to find out more about the class, visit the website. But the real reason I’m writing is to explain how I balance PT school and working as a fitness instructor teaching POUND.

I became a certified POUND Pro in January of this year (as a second year PT student) because I felt that I had found my studying groove in PT school and could handle teaching a class a couple times a week. I mean I have to workout anyway, so why not make some money while doing it?

I wanted to practice teaching the choreography before I applied for a job to teach the class, so I reached out to my lovely classmates on our class Facebook page and asked if any of them would like to take a free class from me. My classmates are extremely supportive, and a couple of them kindly agreed to try out the class. They ended up liking the class so much that I have continued to teach free classes for them almost every week (yes that’s girls AND boys in my class!).

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I decided I had practiced enough and would try my luck at finding a very part time job. I figured I could devote 2-3 hours/week to teaching a class since, like I said earlier, I have to work out anyways! I found a job that I could teach 2 hours/week, plus my free hour class I teach at Regis for my classmates. Sure, it’s hard being in PT school without a job, let alone with a job, but 3 hours a week is COMPLETELY doable. I have a couple of super moms and dads in my class, and let me tell you, my silly 3 hour/week job commitment is nothing compared to the time they devote to being rock star parents!

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Now I am not in any way suggesting that PT students should have a part time job during school….what I am suggesting is to take a couple of hours per week to fulfill what you are passionate about! I’m just lucky that I make a little extra cash while doing so J. PT school is a time commitment, and you truly have to devote many hours to class, studying, and group work, but it’s all about balance. Finding time to do the things you love is absolutely necessary. Whether it’s POUNDing, golfing, skiing, hiking, running, binge watching Netflix or Bravo TV, taking time for yourself is crucial to succeed in PT school!

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If you have any further questions about balancing your time in PT school, feel free to contact me any time at mpearson@regis.edu.