Regis DPT Students Plan the Move Forward 5K/10K

Name: Ryan Bourdo, Class of 2018

Hometown: Corvallis, Oregon

Undergrad: University of Oregon

Fun Fact: I ran a 4K snow shoe race once.

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Race day is always the best. It is the culmination of months of training—immediately followed by the chance to take a well-deserved day, week, or month off from running. The atmosphere is always amazing, too. Everyone is still a little groggy from being up way too early for the weekend, but there is still a palpable excitement; the people next to you on the starting line are instant friends because you all share a common goal: finish the race. And that feeling you get after finishing? Incredible. No matter how tough a race is for me, I am always energetic and talkative afterwards. I have been fortunate enough to run some fun races in the last few years, and I want to bring some of that same excitement to Move Forward.

The Move Forward 5K/10K Race (September 17, 2016) is arguably THE most important event of the year for Regis University’s School of Physical Therapy. I argue this because I am the co-director of the race this year, and this is my blog post. Move Forward is a special event for me. It is a chance to help my school share what we know to be the best ways to live healthy lives. I firmly believe anyone can complete a 5K with practice, motivation, and a little help if needed. More than anything, what I want for people to get out of Move Forward this year is to have a good time and learn a little about taking care of themselves.

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Some of the Class of 2018 after the 2015 Move Forward Race

The idea behind this event is to get people to think about their health, get moving, and live better. For those already signed up, make sure to get to the race early to get your grab bags! We will have bagels, bananas, and coffee for those needing an extra boost in the morning. Several of our classmates will also lead group stretching as well. And then we are off! Music will be blaring, water stations will be flowing, people will be cheering. Whether you are running or walking, we will make sure you have a good time. Make sure to stay after the race, too, because we are planning a lot of post-race greatness. Not only will we have burgers, hot dogs, and beer (not the healthiest, we know, but you deserve it) but we are planning a lot of activities, as well. Informational booths will be there to help guide you in taking care of yourself through exercise, nutrition, and general wellness. We also hope to have some yoga and/or Zumba classes after the race. And, because we want this to be a family event, we are looking for fun activities for kids, tool. Check out our website for updates as our race schedule finalizes: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com.

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Not only will this race be a great way to learn about how to stay healthy, but all of the proceeds will go to Canine for Companions and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine for Companions is especially meaningful to us at Regis because we have an annual team of students that assists in raising a dog before it starts training to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy is also a great cause; it helps support research in physical therapy. If you have not signed up for the race yet and I have thoroughly convinced you of how awesome this event will be, you can register here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/registration-1.

Again, the race will be held on September 17, 2016 and begins at 9:00am.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me directly at rbourdo@regis.edu.

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Many Ryans running

Ryan Bourdo graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo

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The Physical Therapy Outcomes Registry

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Blogger: Katie Baratta

My name is Katie Baratta and I just graduated from the Regis University School of Physical Therapy. I had the opportunity to spend two weeks at the APTA doing a student internship. I was able to talk to many different members of the APTA, attend the Federal Advocacy Forum, and learn more about what the APTA has been doing to move our profession forward. I’ve written a series of essays about my experiences here at the Association.

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Data… I love it! As a former engineer who analyzed a lot of data in my pre-PT life, I find it fascinating to see how lots of tiny bits of information, combined together, can provide us with a more comprehensive picture.

The PT Outcomes Registry is one of APTA’s current projects to create a centralized database for outcome data. The idea is to track a set of prioritized outcome measures (currently there are nine outcomes, but this may expand) across the country. Clinicians perform the outcome assessment with the patient at the initial evaluation and again at discharge to measure the patient’s progress and then input the information into the computerized system. The PT Outcomes Registry then compiles the data from all practitioners so that practitioners can see how they measure against a benchmark of other providers.

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Timeline

The program is still in its pilot phase with 216 enrolled users (currently all practicing PTs, no PTAs) at 25 organizations. The most recent development is to include residents and fellows to compare their outcomes both during their residency/fellowship and again afterward to see how their outcomes change with time and experience. Later this year, APTA will collect feedback via user survey of pilot users regarding usability, pros/cons, glitches, and so forth. The team at APTA will then incorporate this feedback into the PT Outcomes Registry system.

The Registry will officially launch at the beginning of 2017, at which time any clinical site will be able to join. Clinicians will pay to enroll in the program, which will give them access to the aggregated data to see how their practice stacks up against national benchmarks. The service will not be limited to APTA members. Karen Chesbrough, the outcomes registry director, states that by the end of 2017 the APTA would love to have 1000 users, with the long-term goal of involving as many clinicians/sites as possible to get as accurate a picture of current practice as possible.

Which types of data are included?

The current outcomes include global measures, such as AM-PAC™ (Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care™), PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System), and OPTIMAL (Outpatient Physical Therapy Improvement in Movement Assessment Log). There are also regional/body-specific outcome measures such as NDI and Oswestry. Other data includes clinician profiles, patient demographics, and pain ratings; practitioners have the ability to enter data at treatment visits along with at initial evaluations, reassessment, and discharge. The types of outcomes included are vetted through an independent group of clinicians and academics (including one Canadian!) called the Scientific Advisory Panel.

The Scientific Advisory Panel is working in conjunction with the SIGs (Special Interest Groups) to develop prioritized objective data that the clinician would also collect as part of the PT Outcomes Registry based on the patient’s diagnosis. These modules may be specific to cervical pain or to infant torticollis, for example, and would include relevant ROM or other objective data.

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How does PT Outcomes Registry collect the data?

During the pilot program, enrollees are entering the data manually. Enrolled clinicians—or their clinic’s administrative support personnel—will log in to the system and select different tabs and boxes to enter the data, much like they do for electronic documentation of patient records.

However, manual data collection is time-consuming, so the current push within the project’s development is to build software “bridges” with all of the various EMR (electronic medical records) systems. These bridges would allow a computer program to connect the PT Outcomes Registry with each EMR system to pull the relevant pieces of data into the database. Each type of information (eg KOOS at initial eval, patient age, etc) will have an associated tag in the registry database, and each EMR will tag the same variable in their database so that the computer program will be able to match the data from the patient records to the PT Outcomes Registry. One EMR has already signed on to the project, and APTA is working to get more to participate. This will streamline the process significantly and will likely increase participation as less time and energy will be required for individual clinicians to enter the data by hand.

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What does this mean for clinicians?

Being a part of the PT Outcomes Registry would allow clinicians to see how their practice stacks up against others throughout the country. If a particular clinic performed very favorably within the Registry, it would be able to advertise this fact to patients and to different entities that may want to contract with the clinic. Participation in the PT Outcomes Registry would also enable a clinic to pinpoint how to improve poor performance in a particular area that they may not have previously recognized without the aggregate data.

The PT Outcomes Registry will provide objective information to support the assertion that PT restores function. We can then use this information to demonstrate our value to different organizations, whether that is with a hospital, an insurance organization, or to the general public.

The outcomes registry director also sees this information as eventually being linked to reimbursement. Linking outcomes to reimbursement would continue the trend to move away from fee-for-service and toward a value-based payment structure. A value-based payment structure rewards effective clinical practice, rather than performing treatment units with the highest reimbursement rates. This would be a win-win for evidence-based practitioners, as well as for their patients.

Eventually, with enough data, there is potential for the information to be used for research as well; the Outcomes Registry represents the exciting future of our profession!

PT Outcomes Registry Site | More info from the APTA

 

A Non-Native’s Guide to Colorado’s Summer Playground

Name: Evan Piche, Class of 2018

Hometown: Northampton, MA

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Fun Fact: I once thought I met Danny DeVito in an airport men’s room.

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Congratulations! If you’re reading this, there is a fair chance that you are either (a) my mother, or (b) a member of the incoming Class of 2019. Welcome, and since both parties will be visiting Colorado this summer, I’d like to help get you acquainted with some of the best trails Colorado has to offer. Denver is not, strictly speaking, a mountain town in the same sense as Telluride, Steamboat Springs, and Crested Butte are. We’re kind of out on the plains, straddling two worlds—but that doesn’t mean you’ll be short on options for running, hiking, or biking. We Denverites are fortunate enough to enjoy a wealth of those opportunities for after-school outdoor recreation, and when you have a long weekend and are up for a few hours in the car, the options for adventure are limitless.

With that, I’d like to offer my favorite hiking/trail running and mountain biking destinations in the Denver-metro area and beyond. From backcountry escapes to a quick after-class workout, you’re sure to find something to do this summer. (And, while I was not specifically asked to include this, I would be remiss in my duties if I did not use this opportunity to act as your ambassador to the world of Denver’s breakfast burritos.)

Hiking/Trail Running

School day: when you only have an hour or two after class, these are the places to check out! (15- 20 minutes away)

  • Matthews/Winters – Red Rocks Loop
    • A rolling, rocky 5-7 mile loop with fantastic views of the foothills west of Denver and the world-famous and aptly named Red Rocks Amphitheater.Mathew_Winters

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  • Falcon
    • Hands down the best climb in the Denver area, this trail winds its way up four steep technical miles to the summit of Mount Falcon. From here, either retrace your steps to the parking lot nearly 2,000 feet below or continue on to explore a vast trail network.Mt_Falcon.jpg

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  • Green Mountain, Lakewood
    • A mostly gentle 5-8 mile single track loop featuring the Front Range’s best sunrise and sunset views.Green_Mtn

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Weekend: about a 90-minute drive from Denver

  • Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park
    • A classic RMNP hike; after meandering around the base of Long’s Peak, the trail turns vertical and ends with a fun scramble to Sky Pond amid boulder fields and some of the Park’s most impressive glaciers.Sky_Pond_RMNP

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Long Weekend: 3-5 hours from Denver

  • West Maroon Pass, Aspen to Crested Butte
    • This is considered a rite of passage among Colorado hikers and trail runners. While the towns of Crested Butte and Aspen are separated by one hundred miles of highway, this challenging, backcountry trail connects them so that “only” 10 miles sit between them. Pack a bathing suit (or not) for a dip in Conundrum Hot Springs if you plan to do this trip properly.

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Mountain Biking

School day:

  • Lair O’ the Bear 
    • Swoopy, flowing lines, grinding climbs, open meadows, and a breathtaking view of Mount Evans—all less than 30 minutes from Denver. After riding, grab a burger or brew in one of Morrison’s quaint eateries.Lair_of_the_bear

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  • White Ranch 
    • This is a gem of a park and located only a few miles north of Golden; it offers trails that rival anything in Boulder (after all, you can see the iconic Flatirons from the parking lot) with a fraction of the traffic.White_Ranch

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  • Apex Mountain Park, Enchanted Forest Trail 
    • Apex is one of Denver’s most well-utilized mountain bike trail networks, and with good reason. The Enchanted Forest descent is not to be missed. Be sure to check the link provided for alternate direction riding restrictions on odd/even days before you go. Bonus: these trails are a blast to ride in the snow after the fat bikers, skiers, and snowshoers do all the dirty work of packing down the snow.Apex_EnchantedF_Forest

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Weekend:

  • Blue Sky to Indian Summer
    • Regardless of whether you mountain bike or hike (or climb, or paddle, or just enjoy beer), a trip to Fort Collins is always enjoyable. Fort Fun is home to one of the Front Range’s finest fast, flowing mountain bike trails. While options abound for long climbs up to the summit of Horsetooth Mountain Park, the Blue Sky Trail sticks to the lowlands, traversing a spectacular cliff line with scenery reminiscent of your favorite Western movie. Also, New Belgium brewery is not to be missed.

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Long Weekend:

  • 401 Trail, Crested Butte, CO
    • Come spring and early summer, the wildflowers on this ultra-classic trail grow to be chest-high. Imagine ripping down 14 miles of high country singletrack, with views of snowcapped mountains disappearing and reappearing as you dive into and out of fields of wildflowers so high and dense as to obscure your line of sight. Be sure to grab tacos at Teocalli Tamale once back in town.401_Trail_CB

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  • Slickrock Trail, Moab Utah
    • Quite possibly the most famous mountain bike trail in the world—and for good reason. Slickrock offers an other-worldly experience: an ocean of red sandstone surrounds you, with views of the Colorado River far below in the canyon. In the distance, the snowcapped La Sal Mountains dwarf the landscape and offer a stunning contrast to the red, pink, and orange hues of the desert. For après ride fun, check out the Moab Brewery, located right in the center of town—it’s an oasis of alcohol and burgers in an otherwise remarkably dry state.Slickrock

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Burritos

The breakfast burrito was invented in the kitchen of Tia Sophia’s in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1975. Since that historic day, it has been possible to eat a burrito for all 3 (or more) meals of the day, a feat now commonly referred to as a “hat trick.” Like most of Denver, the breakfast burrito is not native to Colorado, but found in our city a welcoming home. I am unsure of whether or not Colorado has an “official” state food, but I would nominate the breakfast burrito for that honor.

With the help of acclaimed writer and Denver resident Brendan Leonard, I have assembled the definitive guide to Denver’s Best Breakfast Burritos:

  • Grand Prize: El Taco de Mexico on Santa Fe
  • First Runner Up: Bocaza on 17th Ave.
  • Second Runner Up: Steve’s Snappin’ Dogs
  • Honorable Mention: Illegal Pete’s
  • People’s Choice: Campfire Burritos (food truck)

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    Evan is an avid biker, trail runner and climber.  We hope you enjoyed his pictures and guide to an adventurous CO summer!

 

Physical Therapy Classification and Payment System: a Discussion with Lindsay Still

 

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Blogger: Katie Baratta

My name is Katie Baratta and I just graduated from the Regis University School of Physical Therapy. I had the opportunity to spend two weeks at the APTA doing a student internship. I was able to talk to many different members of the APTA, attend the Federal Advocacy Forum, and learn more about what the APTA has been doing to move our profession forward. I’ve written a series of essays about my experiences here at the Association.

Interview with Lindsay Still, Senior Payment Specialist

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I talked with Lindsay Still, a Senior Payment Specialist, and she explained the current state of the PTCPS.  Read a summary of our interview below!

Overview

The Physical Therapy Classification and Payment System (PTCPS) is an ongoing initiative that was developed as an alternative to the current, fee-for-service codes—ones that easily fail to capture the true value of what PTs do—and instead particularly account for the complexity and skill of clinical expertise required for patients with more involved presentations. It also incorporates the use of standardized outcome measures. PTCPS would include a single CPT (Current Procedural Technology) code for the entire treatment session versus the assortment of 15-minute unit codes that we’re used to today.

The system has gone through multiple iterations in the past several years, and was developed by the APTA in collaboration with a specialty work group within the AMA (American Medical Association) involving members from the professional organizations of OTs, massage therapists, athletic trainers, speech-language pathologists, chiropractors, psychologists, optometrists, podiatrists, physiatrists, neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, osteopathic physicians, and representatives of CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services).

Structure of the new coding system

Under the new system, there would be three new evaluation codes that puts a patient into an initial category of lower, moderate, or higher complexity. Certain documentation criteria (e.g. under patient history, presentation, or plan of care) would determine which of the three eval codes you would select. For example, the number of comorbidities for a given patient would play a role in the eval code selection. There would also be a single code for any re-eval visit.

As currently structured, the proposed PTCPS would also incorporate five treatment codes, based on the overall complexity of the patient’s presentation and treatments. These codes, much like our current CPT code for evals (97001 Physical Therapy Evaluation), would not have a set time frame or number of units associated with it. However, treatment billed under the lowest complexity code would likely be much shorter than a treatment session under the highest complexity code, and the reimbursements would reflect this fact.

Implementation

In 2014, pilot testing of the new system was performed with PTs using the new system to code/bill for hypothetical patients, as well as using the new system to code the treatments of actual patients previously coded with the existing system. This testing occurred in various care settings. Overall, the clinicians were very consistent in their ability to categorize patients with the new initial eval codes. However, for the intervention codes, the pilot clinicians were only able to consistently categorize those patients with the least complex and most complex presentations. There was significant disagreement between PTs in regards to cases that fell within the different “moderate” treatment categories.

The definitions and valuation of the proposed eval codes were reviewed and approved by the RUC (Relative Value Scale Update Committee) and will now require CMS approval. Lindsay is hopeful that CMS will accept the new eval codes, as they will be budget-neutral. In August of 2016, CMS will release the 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule; this should include the new PT evaluation and reevaluation codes. The new codes will go live on January 1, 2017. PTs will have three brand-new CPT codes to replace the current 97001 Physical Therapy Evaluation. The APTA will provide training and support to clinicians during the time leading up to the release of the new eval codes.

Impediments to the impending treatment code change

The new treatment codes will require further review and refinement, given their inconsistency of use during the pilot testing. This will likely be an interactive process, and not without controversy from the perspective of payers (insurance companies). In the meantime, the RUC has requested a “backup plan” to address ten CPT codes commonly used by PTs which have been identified as “potentially misvalued codes,” most of which PTs probably use frequently:

  • 97032 attended electrical stimulation
  • 97035 ultrasound
  • 97110 therapeutic exercise
  • 97112 neuromuscular reeducation
  • 97113 aquatic therapy with therapeutic exercise
  • 97116 gait training
  • 97140 manual therapy
  • 97530 therapeutic activities
  • 97535 self care home management training
  • G0283 unattended electrical stimulation (non-wound)

These codes are flagged  because they represent a high reimbursement rate and have not been assessed since 1994.

As a result, the APTA is currently redirecting efforts to provide replacements to those 10 codes rather than waiting for the codes to be reevaluated for us. The new treatment codes the APTA envisions to replace them with would be procedure-based: you would still bill in 15-minute increments. However, they would be streamlined; there would be fewer codes, and the codes would reflect the types of treatment PTs currently perform in practice (as opposed to focusing on what treatments PTs may have historically performed).

Future of the proposed treatment codes

The more general patient- and value-based treatment codes initially envisioned by the APTA are still in the works, but Lindsay foresees a longer process before fruition: it will require all parties to agree on a coding system that accurately and cost-effectively describes the type of treatments that PTs perform for patients. This includes the third-party payers who generally prefer the current setup of treatment codes based on billable units. The current coding system is easy to monitor for abuse or overuse of treatments.

I asked Lindsay if she saw outcome measures as one way of giving insurance companies some power to track the value of treatments under the proposed system. While they wouldn’t be able to screen specific procedures in the same way that they are able to under the current system, they would be able to, for example, monitor whether the progress of a “low complexity” patient was lagging behind what would be expected given that patient’s presentation.

She agreed that this could work in theory, but felt that we still have a long way to go in terms of standardization of outcome data across the spectrum of patient presentation. This is one of the reasons the PT Outcomes Registry will be so important! These two issues truly are intertwined in the future of value-based billing for PT services.

For more information, visit: http://www.apta.org/PTCPS and check out the Timeline for payment reform.

Balancing a Relationship with PT School

Being married is the best. I get to do life with my best friend every day, and it was a definite perk that I didn’t have to find a roommate when coming to PT school. For those of you who are starting PT school this fall and are married or in a relationship, here are a few things to think about.

  1. If you’ve gotten this far and are still in a relationship, then your significant other is incredibly supportive of you. Don’t forget to thank him or her! He or she will be your biggest advocate and cheerleader over then next three years. Let them know how much you appreciate their sacrifices so that you can pursue your dream.
  1. Yes, school is tough, and you need to study. A LOT. But make sure that you don’t neglect your relationship. When I interviewed at Regis, my interviewer said to me, “We don’t want to break up marriages.” Your relationship will last far longer than your time in PT school. Do your best in school, but intentionally set time aside to spend with your significant other. They get lonely sitting on the couch quietly watching someone study all the time, so plan on doing fun things and going on dates. There’s a lot to do here in Colorado. Go explore!  Some of our dates have included:
    1. Road trip to Mt. Rushmore (it’s only 5.5 hours away!)IMG_51362. Horseback riding and snow hiking in Estes Park–it’s the entry town to Rocky Mountain National Park (1 hour away)IMG_5263.JPG3.  Hiking in Golden (15 minutes away)IMG_5862 4.  Musical at the Buell (10-15 minutes away)IMG_5634.JPG
  1. Remember that everyone’s relationship is different, and you have to find a balance that works for you. Some of my classmates have significant others who work 8-5 jobs and can have dinner together each night. They usually study during the week and take a day off on the weekends to play. My husband is an ER nurse and works 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., so there are many days that I leave before he wakes up and to bed before he gets home. He works many weekends, so I do lots of homework during the weekend and then take a day off of studying during the week when he has off.  That’s okay. Do what works for you. There is no one correct recipe for success in this program.
  1. Lastly, be patient with your significant other. He or she really likes to be with you, and it will be an adjustment for both of you adapt to PT school. Don’t get discouraged. You will make it!

Overall, is having a relationship hard during PT school? Absolutely. It’s one more thing to think about and invest in with an already filled schedule. However, you will never see your significant other’s support and kindness more than over the next three years. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

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Blogger: Katie Ragle

Class of 2017 DPT Student Lindsay Mayors Reflects on Her Clinical Rotation

Name:  Lindsay Mayors

Hometown: Akron, Ohio

Undergrad: University of Dayton

Fun Fact: My first experience skiing was on my third birthday in Keystone, Colorado!

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Today, the Class of 2017 has reached the halfway point of their 8-week second clinical rotation. The past two semesters have been filled with management courses, case studies, exams, practicals, and research. In April, we completed all three management course series; needless to say we were ready to get out into the clinic! Students are working in a variety of settings including acute care hospitals, inpatient neurological rehab, sub-acute rehab, long-term acute care, home health, outpatient orthopedic, outpatient pediatric, and school-based therapy from Virginia all the way to Alaska. We are applying our freshly developed clinical reasoning skills and continuing to learn immensely from our clinical instructors.

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Lindsay and her first year mentor, Vickie

Many of my classmates will tell you that I am one of the “peds people.” I started the program in August 2014 with my mind set on becoming a pediatric physical therapist. I would be nearly skipping in the hallways on the way to pediatric-based labs or lectures. So, when it came time for me to start my second clinical rotation at a skilled nursing sub-acute rehabilitation facility, I did not know what to expect. It seems to be a common theme among students to not prefer to work with the geriatric population. I know that I even had my doubts. Would I know how to relate to the elderly population? Would my 5’2 stature have the body mechanics to help patients transfer in and out of chairs or their hospital beds? Would I get bored doing seemingly the same exercises with patients day after day? Will this type of rotation be helpful for me if it is not the setting in which I ultimately would like to work?

Within just two days of the clinical rotation I had my answers. I am overjoyed when I get to connect with the elderly population. I remembered and have safely applied the transferring tips from a faculty member with my similar stature (Thanks, Christina!). The exercises that I perform with patients are all but monotonous. I have had the opportunity to apply skills from all three of the management course series with patients. Sure, many of the patients have similar physical therapy diagnoses, but beyond the diagnosis each is incredibly unique.

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Liz, Lindsay and Carol at the Class of 2016’s research night in April

Each has their own personal story, their own medical history, their own family dynamic, their own goals, and their own hobbies. Not one personality resembles another. This is what makes this setting so exciting for me. Learning about what has molded a particular patient into the individual that they are now is the highlight of my day. Shaping treatment plans to match a patient’s personal goals and find the highest level of independence for them allows me to use my creativity in a new way with every patient. We walk (a lot), stand on foamy surfaces and toss balloons, and maneuver wheel chairs around obstacle courses. We talk about the joys, challenges, and hilarities of life. I have recognized that the age of a patient–whether 3 or 93 years young–is not a barrier. We are all human. We enjoy being heard, feeling validated, feeling empowered, and having our days be brightened by a smile.

So, I would like to challenge any student who has similar doubts as I did a mere month ago to take a step into the unknown. Unravel your pre-set plans and experience something on the extreme opposite spectrum from the setting in which you think you want to work. Sure–I am still interested in being a pediatric physical therapist, but at the very least, my mind has been opened to new considerations. No matter the population I ultimately end up working with, I now have a broader understanding, appreciation, and passion for the field of physical therapy because of this rotation.

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Lindsay and her classmates are currently all at clinical rotations across the country

Crash Course: How to Dress for PT School

The dreaded dress code! Our student handbook says:

As future health care professionals, graduate students in physical therapy are expected to dress in a manner that exemplifies professionalism during class, during on campus activities, and in clinical situations.

As scary as that sounds, it’s really not so bad. There is no need to run out and buy all new clothes! (Unless you only wear yoga pants and track suits. I mean–respect for that, but gotta keep if profesh now). There are tons of ways to make clothing you already have work.

Let’s go over some of the big things:

  • Plain t-shirts are definitely okay. Shirts with logos or writing are not (unless it is the Regis PT logo!).
  • There will be a Regis PT clothing order in the fall! The bookstore only has one thing that says “physical therapy” on it, so don’t worry about buying that–wait for the clothing order!  Items purchased from the clothing order can be worn to class.
  • Buying a lot of basics that you can mix and match is a really good idea. If you have a few pairs of good pants, a variety of colored tops, and good shoes, you can make dozens of outfits. Scarves and jewelry can always be used to accessorize and liven things up.
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Basic Ts, pants and skirts are all recommended!

  • Shoes must have backstraps! Things like Chacos or Tevas are fine, but they need to have a backstrap.
  • Invest in some quality shoes. Sneakers are allowed in the dress code, and you are going to be wearing them a lot. Find some that give you good support, but can also look okay with your class clothes.
  • The main lecture hall—you’ll come to know and love it intimately—can go from freezing to a sauna within 15 minutes. Having layers to put on or take off is always a good idea.
  • You’ll notice that the dress code mentions things like facial piercings, odd hair colors, and tattoos. While I wouldn’t recommend getting 7 facial piercings and 4 new tattoos, this isn’t something to worry about! Many members of the current student body have tattoos and facial piercings; that being said, keep this in mind when finding clothing for class.  It’s okay to have them showing in lab, but try your hardest to keep them covered for lecture.
  • Lab clothes are generally exercise clothes. If you only have one pair of running shorts/leggings, this might be the time to get a couple more. You will wear these clothes a lot!  You are expected to bring your lab and professional clothes to switch between classes, but you all will have lockers if you want to keep clothes on campus.

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    Here’s the Class of 2018 intramural soccer team modeling some great lab clothing examples!

  • For anatomy lab, most people wore scrubs or sweats. Whatever you wear, do not plan on wearing it ever again. The scent of the lab will never leave.

What it really comes down to is this: how do you want to present yourself to your classmates and professors? If khakis, sneakers, and a solid color t-shirt are your comfort zone, awesome! If it’s a skirt and blouse, great! If there’s a collar, lovely! Don’t put too much pressure on yourself to change your entire style. Wait and see what you find yourself wearing to class and what you find comfortable, and do your shopping after school has started.

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Carol, Nolan, and Courtney showing off their professional attire

Keep in mind that this is the clothing you’ll be using when on clinical rotations and at conferences—think about what will make you be the most comfortable and professional clinician possible.

Finally, my classmate, Cameron, wants you all to know that Crocs do count.

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Maroon pants aren’t required, but are strongly encouraged for photo ops like this.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me at msutton001@regis.edu!

madeleineblogger

Blogger: Madeleine Sutton

 

Stress Decompression with the 2nd Year Regis DPT Students

After a long week of studying, practicing skills, and being evaluated for skill competency, what better way is there to decompress than pounding it out? After such a stressful week some may have wanted to pound their head against their desk, but second-year student Morgan Pearson had a different idea. During this Thursday’s lunch break, a classroom turned into an exercise studio as Morgan led 15 classmates in a POUND fitness class. This cardio workout incorporates numerous whole-body strengthening exercises such as squats, lunges, jumps, and abdominal crunches–all while pounding drum sticks to the beat of the music.12915268_10154141123068278_1424337970_o

I must admit, at first sight, I was unconvinced that everyone would stay in-sync with their drumsticks. But I was proven wrong when, after just 18 minutes, Morgan whole-heartedly exclaimed, “Yes!! We sound like we are in a band!” Needless to say, students caught on very quickly to Morgan’s encouraging and tough class. They even cheered for one last song towards the end of the workout. After class, second-year student Christy Houk joyfully stated, “Every single muscle fiber in my body is burning!”

Morgan plans to lead classes every Thursday at lunch in Claver Hall room 410 for the remainder of the semester. So come one, come all, and be ready to sweat, burn, and POUND out your stressors! You might just learn some new exercises for your future patients, too!

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Blogger: Lindsay Mayors

How to train for Boston and survive PT school: Meet Lauren Hill

Name: Lauren Hill, Class of 2017

Hometown: Flat Rock, MI

Undergrad: Saginaw Valley State University

Fun fact: Never wears matching socks…ever.

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They’ll tell you PT school is a marathon…not a sprint.

I apparently took that a bit too literally.

I’ve run two marathons and two half-marathons since starting PT school; that’s over 2500 miles of training and racing.

Let me back up a bit:

I’m Lauren. Born and raised in Michigan. I went to Saginaw Valley State University for undergrad and double majored in Exercise Science and Psychology. That, for me, was where running really started. I walked on to our cross country/track teams back in 2008 and was—for lack of a better adjective—terrible. I’m not sure why they let me stick around…maybe for entertainment…or to make everyone else feel faster?  Well, after some frank talks with myself and a few good friends, things started to come together. I went from the track equivalent of the “12th man” to placing in the conference, nationally, and eventually becoming a two-time All-American. When I graduated, I felt lost: the last five years had been dedicated to my teammates, mileage and chasing All-American accolades.

So there I stood: two bachelor degrees in hand, PT school applications underway and no longer a delineated reason to run.  I realized I needed a new challenge.

New Goal: Run the Boston Marathon 

Why not? 

I qualified and planned to run Boston in 2015…which happened to be the week before finals of my second semester at Regis.

 Training for the Boston Marathon (or any marathon for that matter) is not a particularly easy task.  Now, add to that 40+ hours of class per week, 10 hours commuting, a significant other, 2-4 hours studying per day (and way more on weekends) and trying to get an adequate amount of sleep… As you can imagine, life got got incredibly busy very quickly. 

A typical day looked a lot like this:

6:15 Wake up, Breakfast

7-8 Commute to Regis

8-12 Lectures

12-1 Lunch break—Run 3-6 miles

1-4 Labs

4-5 Commute

5-??? Run #2–Anywhere from 3-10 more miles depending on the day, Dinner, Study ‘til bedtime

11 Bed

You learn a lot about BALANCE when training for a marathon. You also learn to say “no” to a lot of extracurricular activities:

“ Do you want to grab a beer after class?”

No, I can’t, I have to run.

Do you want to go to the mountains this weekend?”

No, I can’t, I have a long run.

“ Do you want to want to hang out tonight?”

No, I can’t, I have to get up early tomorrow and run. 

My goal for Boston was sub-2:50—an arbitrary time that I let consume me for those 16 weeks (and beyond, if we are being honest). On the outside, I had fun with training, but inside I put an overwhelming amount of pressure on myself to reach that mark.

I failed.

 3:01.

Regardless of the weather conditions, (34 degrees, head wind, pouring rain and Hypothermia by the end)….I was pissed.

I had failed.

But, after months of reflecting (and even while writing this), I have begun to see the race and the months of training as a chapter in life with a lot of little lessons learned (some the hard way).

I do my best thinking when I run, and over time have created what I call My Truths—These are things I realized about myself, running, PT school and life. Take them for what you will. This list will inevitably change, as I do, but it’s a framework that works for me today.  These 13 truths won’t change your life, but I hope you may relate or take something from at least one of them.

Lauren’s 13 Truths

  1. If it doesn’t make you happy, re-evaluate your decisions.
  2. Just because it makes everyone else happy doesn’t mean it’s for you.
  3. Places/destinations are always there…family is not.
  4. What’s monitored is managed.
  5. Be realistic with your goals. Rome wasn’t built in a day.
  6. Morning workouts make for a more productive day.
  7. Fix problems at their root; don’t just put a Band-Aid on it.
  8. Hope is an excuse for doing nothing” – Coach Ed
  9. No matter how much you plan, there are some things you can’t control.
  10. Who you were has shaped you, but to be who you will become you must accept change.
  11. Don’t go or plan to do anything when hungry.
  12. If it’s supposed to be fun but feels like a job, you need a break.
  13. …..coffee first.

I do plan on running Boston in 2017. It seems only appropriate to finish at Regis the same way it began, only this time, I hope to bring a clearer perspective on running, life and happiness. 

Happy Strides!

– Lauren

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