How to Conquer Time Management

Name: Sarina Tamura, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of Colorado at Boulder
Hometown: Aurora, CO
Fun Fact: I won 2nd place at the World Cup Stacking Championships in 5th grade!

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Sarina is a full-time student and competitive dancer

You dance. Why?

My life has always been an endless mixtape of dynamic tracks. Two days after graduating from CU Boulder in 2014, I started work as a full-time PT aide, travelled Europe for 3 weeks the day after moving on from that position, and returned home literally the day before I started PT school.

My childhood was no different. I was completely engulfed with dance, gymnastics, and the violin. I trained in both dance disciplines (dance styles including ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, and Irish) from age 3 until 13, then I decided to pursue gymnastics instead. I competed, coached, and judged until I tore my ACL at 17, then returned to dance, where I fell in love with hip-hop and breaking. It seems like my life is perpetually skipping from one track to the next.

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I normally hesitate to tell people that I’m a breakdancer because I feel that breakdancing has a great deal of negative stereotypes associated with it. We aren’t “hood,” we don’t live on the streets, we aren’t violent and aggressive people, and no, we don’t all spin on our heads. It’s actually quite the opposite–the hip-hop culture is all about peace, love, unity, and having fun. In fact, I’ve met some of the most influential people through the world of dance and have brothers and sisters all over the world now thanks to this culture. Dance has provided me with so many cool opportunities that I could have never imagined. For instance, I’ve opened for the Jabbawockeez, performed for the NCAA Final Four Opening Ceremony, performed at the Buell Theater, and performed/competed nationally and internationally in Japan. Not to mention, I get to travel all the time with my closest friends!

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Sarina competed in Japan over the winter break

What does your typical week look like?

I wake up at 5:30 and leave the house by 6:30. I commute to Regis from SE Aurora (roughly 45min-1hr commute) so I try to beat the morning traffic. Having a long commute is both a curse and a blessing: it forces me to get to school early and study before class, yet it’s also my ideal time to listen to music and relax. After classes, I stay at school to study until it’s time to teach and/or practice in the evening. I teach 3 days/week at 2 dance studios and teach privates some weekends (this is how I manage to fund my dance travels). I usually practice 4 days/week for 2-3 hours per session. I get home around 10 or 11, fit in some more studying, then repeat it all again the next day.

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Sarina in Downtown Denver

While being out all day sounds exhausting, it forces me to be productive. It prevents me from taking naps, watching movies, and snacking on junk food – all things I would probably do if I were home. I typically compete or perform almost every weekend (some months are busier than others). I sometimes get hired to perform at events and that brings in some extra cash, which always helps. I’m a weekend warrior in that I take short weekend trips to competitions quite often, so studying on planes have become a regular requirement. It can be exhausting, but it’s super rewarding. On weekends that I’m not out of town, I like to leave Sundays open for studying, spending time with family, or going hiking/snowboarding. While this is what my typical week looks like, I often have to make sacrifices to study (this was especially true during the rigorous 1st year!). Having a schedule is important, but you also need to be open and flexible – things don’t always go as planned.

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Sarina with some of her Class of 2018 classmates

Being in PT school has made me realize the true value of time. Having so little free time encourages me to focus primarily on the people who are most important to me, and that’s been invaluable to my quality of life. My planner is my bible. I try to plan out my days in advance so that I accomplish everything that needs to get done. This is especially important on weekends that I’ll be competing or traveling so I don’t fall behind. Mental image training has also become a skill I’ve refined over the years; on the days that I just can’t make it to the studio, I can sit and choreograph or think of new combinations as a study break. I’ve found that mental practice can often be just as effective as physical practice.

What are the biggest tips you can give to an incoming DPT student?

  1. “I don’t have time” is just not an excuse—if something is important to you, you’ll make time for it. My biggest worry going into PT school was that I wouldn’t be able to dance anymore, but that didn’t end up being true at all. In fact, I’m entering more competitions and traveling more now than I ever have! (I actually counted out of curiosity and I’ve done 34 competitions/ performances since starting PT school–10 of which were out of state and 4 of which were international!) If anything, having a life outside of PT school and having dance as an outlet to relieve stress has been a huge asset. It’s nice having an identity outside of just being a physical therapy student.
  1. Learn to say “no.” This is also advice for myself because it’s something I still struggle with. There’ve been many times I agreed to do a gig or sub classes at the studio when I shouldn’t have and broke down because I was so overwhelmed. Life is all about balance. Always ask yourself what your priorities are. If it interferes with your priorities, say no. Respect your time and take care of yourself!

Now, granted, I’ve structured my life in a way that allows me to do all of these things. I’ve put dating aside for now to pursue my passions, and I don’t have a family to take care of unlike a lot of my classmates–so I have the freedom to live the lifestyle I do while still excelling in school. I can get burnt out and frustrated, but there’s nothing a little ice cream can’t fix! 😉 Structure your life in a way that works for you. PT school is tough, but it’s definitely doable. Pursue your passions and do the things that enrich your life. In this world full of temporary things, it’s a dangerous mentality to believe there’s always next time. It’s our last few years of being a student—it’s the best time to do whatever you want, so take advantage of it! Good luck!

 

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Flat Stanley Goes to Clinical

Name: Nicole Darragh, Class of 2017

Hometown: Columbus, OH

Undergrad: Regis University

Fun Fact: I think kale is totally overrated.

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The Class of 2017 recently returned from their second clinical rotations with a plethora of new knowledge and stories to share.  Some students even had a visitor along the way: Flat Stanley.  Flat Stanley is a small paper figurine that keeps students connected outside of the classroom.  Students take a photo of Flat Stanley completing an activity, learning a new technique, or going to a cool new location, and share those photos with their classmates through social media.  This helped us learn a little bit about each rotation, and keep in touch with our classmates.

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Pictured: Sarah Campbell ’17 with Flat Stanley on her first day of clinical (PC: Sarah Campbell)

Flat Stanley traveled to a wide variety of locations across the country including California, Wyoming, Kentucky, and even Alaska!  Along the way, Flat Stanley learned new documentation systems, new techniques in the clinics, and went on a lot of hikes.  Really, what Flat Stanley is trying to tell you is that while you’re on your clinical rotation, don’t forget to take the time to explore your new surroundings!

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Flat Stanley reviews Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) while at clinic in Chico, CA (PC: Adam Engelsgjerd)

 

Clinical rotations work in a variety of ways.  The first is the lottery option; students choose ten clinical sites from a large list compiled by the clinical education faculty, and rank them in order from 1-10.  Once the lottery is generated, students are placed at a site.  The second is the first come, first serve option; students can choose a site before the lottery begins that they are particularly interested in, and request to be placed at that site before it is taken.  The third is the set-up option: students are allowed to contact a clinical site that is not affiliated with Regis and set up a clinical rotation with them if they are interested.  When rotations get closer, you’ll learn more specifics about how they work, requirements, etc.

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Flat Stanley’s meet up at Devil’s Tower outside of Gillette, WY (PC: Amanda Morrow)

 

Throughout the clinical process, it is important to know that you might not always end up in Denver, and you’ll have to try something new!  Wherever you do end up, make sure to enjoy your free time.  Clinical can sometimes be very overwhelming, and it is crucial to take time for yourself, whether that be exploring your new surroundings, trying a local restaurant, or binging on Netflix.  And if the thought of being gone for six, eight, or twelve weeks scares you a little, all of us will tell you that the time flies by so quickly.  There isn’t much time to be bored!

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Flat Stanley goes sandboarding in the Great Sand Dunes National Park in southern Colorado (PC: Lauren Hill)

 

If you have any further questions about clinical rotations–or other places Flat Stanley and/or students traveled–please feel free to contact me at darra608@regis.edu!  Also, I would recommend reading the post below called “Class of 2017 DPT Student Lindsay Mayors Reflects on Her Clinical Rotation.” (https://regisdpt.org/2016/05/27/class-of-2017-dpt-student-lindsay-mayors-reflects-on-her-clinical-rotation/)

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Flat Stanley helps out with some end-of-the-day documentation (PC: Amy Medlock)

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Flat Stanley enjoying a nice Moscow Mule after a long week at clinical (PC: Amy Medlock)

 

 

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Flat Stanley joins Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson to run the Bolder Boulder race (PC: Lauren Hill)

Cover PC: David Cummins, Class of 2019

 

Balancing a Relationship with PT School

Being married is the best. I get to do life with my best friend every day, and it was a definite perk that I didn’t have to find a roommate when coming to PT school. For those of you who are starting PT school this fall and are married or in a relationship, here are a few things to think about.

  1. If you’ve gotten this far and are still in a relationship, then your significant other is incredibly supportive of you. Don’t forget to thank him or her! He or she will be your biggest advocate and cheerleader over then next three years. Let them know how much you appreciate their sacrifices so that you can pursue your dream.
  1. Yes, school is tough, and you need to study. A LOT. But make sure that you don’t neglect your relationship. When I interviewed at Regis, my interviewer said to me, “We don’t want to break up marriages.” Your relationship will last far longer than your time in PT school. Do your best in school, but intentionally set time aside to spend with your significant other. They get lonely sitting on the couch quietly watching someone study all the time, so plan on doing fun things and going on dates. There’s a lot to do here in Colorado. Go explore!  Some of our dates have included:
    1. Road trip to Mt. Rushmore (it’s only 5.5 hours away!)IMG_51362. Horseback riding and snow hiking in Estes Park–it’s the entry town to Rocky Mountain National Park (1 hour away)IMG_5263.JPG3.  Hiking in Golden (15 minutes away)IMG_5862 4.  Musical at the Buell (10-15 minutes away)IMG_5634.JPG
  1. Remember that everyone’s relationship is different, and you have to find a balance that works for you. Some of my classmates have significant others who work 8-5 jobs and can have dinner together each night. They usually study during the week and take a day off on the weekends to play. My husband is an ER nurse and works 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., so there are many days that I leave before he wakes up and to bed before he gets home. He works many weekends, so I do lots of homework during the weekend and then take a day off of studying during the week when he has off.  That’s okay. Do what works for you. There is no one correct recipe for success in this program.
  1. Lastly, be patient with your significant other. He or she really likes to be with you, and it will be an adjustment for both of you adapt to PT school. Don’t get discouraged. You will make it!

Overall, is having a relationship hard during PT school? Absolutely. It’s one more thing to think about and invest in with an already filled schedule. However, you will never see your significant other’s support and kindness more than over the next three years. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

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Blogger: Katie Ragle

Commuting to Class: Meet Leigh Dugan

Name: Leigh Dugan

Hometown: Boston, Massachusetts

Undergrad: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Fun Fact: My husband is in the military and we have moved 4 times in 2 years!!

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Hi, Class of 2019! Congratulations on your acceptance to the Regis DPT program; you will not regret your decision to come here. So, now that you have made the choice to make Denver, CO your home, the next step is deciding where to live. Most of you will live close by, so getting to school will not be a problem. However, there may be a few of you that do not have the luxury to live that close for whatever reason. This was the situation that I found myself in a year ago when I decided to go to Regis in the fall. My family could not relocate to Denver and I made the decision to commute from Colorado Springs each day—a 140-mile roundtrip journey on each side of an 8-5pm class day.

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Leigh, Taylor and Amanada enjoying some time off of school

I decided to write this blog post because I wish that I had been able to talk to someone to tell me that yes, it is possible and yes, it will be tough. If this is something you are trying to figure out before beginning PT school in August, here are a few tips that I would love to share with you to hopefully make your decision easier:

  1. The commute IS indeed possible and was actually quite relaxing after a long school day.
  2. Take the time during your drive to decompress. Sometimes, I would sit in absolute silence and take the time to relax and reflect on the day. It is a good excuse to truly do nothing.
  3. Be prepared to not have much of a life. When you drive for 3 hours each day, most of your free time is devoted to studying. I wish I could say that there wasn’t much work outside of school in the first year, but that is not the case. Be prepared to spend a few hours after class each day doing school work or studying.
  4. To add to the above comment, you have to really make an effort to balance fun times and studying in your free time. This is so important for anyone in PT school to ensure that you keep your sanity!
  5. Group projects can be tough to coordinate, but all of my classmates took into consideration my commute and it worked out fine.
  6. Find a good podcast that is “mindless.” After a long day of learning, you will want something that is entertaining but isn’t taxing on your mind.
  7. Waze, the traffic app, will be your best friend.
  8. You will figure out the best times to leave your house in order to dodge traffic. I really learned to take advantage of the extra time I had at school before and after class to get work done so I wouldn’t have to do it at home.
  9. It is tough to miss out on all of the fun activities after class. A lot of times, my classmates would go out to concerts or for drinks on weekends and it would be hard to miss these moments. Make an effort to still engage with your class! I never regretted spending the night on a couch so I could join in on the fun :).
  10. Do not be afraid to ask for help from your classmates. You will find that everyone in your class is on the same team and they truly want to help. I would not have survived without them!
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Brunch after second semester finals

Feel free to email me if you have any specific questions on commuting or any questions at all about Regis! Congratulations again on your acceptance to Regis!

Blogger: Leigh Dugan, ldugan@regis.edu

Commuting, anatomy groups, and transitions: Meet Amanda Rixey

Amanda Rixey

Hometown: Overland Park, KS

Undergrad: University of Kansas

Fun fact: I used to be a ballet dancer.
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Transitioning from life as a dance major in undergrad to life as a physical therapy student was a challenge.  I used to spend eight or more hours a day in dance classes or rehearsals with a few science classes interspersed. The switch to a mixture of lectures and labs throughout the day was difficult to get used to; as someone who needs to constantly be active, I found my biggest challenge of first semester was sitting in my chair during lectures!  Luckily, because the faculty similarly love movement, we get 10-minute breaks every hour to move around and stretch.

Another challenge I found was getting used to city life.  As someone who previously would do anything to avoid driving on highways, I had to brave rush hour traffic in order to get to school on time.  I tried taking side roads, but it took me almost 45 minutes!  I think it’s safe to say I’ve mastered driving them after a few months of living here (even though my car did die on the side of the road on the first day of school).

Regis does a fantastic job making sure their students feel comfortable. At the beginning of the semester, our class was divided into anatomy lab groups based on our personality and learning types.  This was the most beneficial part of first semester—I was able to take the data from my results and use this to understand how I learn and how I communicate with my classmates and professors (they are surprisingly accurate…and I love personality tests!).  Also, our groups were formed with students of different learning styles; this worked out wonderfully, despite what you might think.  I am a student who doesn’t necessarily like to take on leadership positions.  Luckily, I was in a group where a few students would facilitate how we would go about dissecting or starting a project.  A bonus of spending an inordinate amount of time with a cadaver and my group is that now I have five other students I can go to for anything and feel comfortable working with.

Because of the relaxed learning environment we had in my anatomy group, anatomy became my favorite course of first semester.  The intricate detail and vast amount of material from Cliff, our professor, made it a fun challenge for me and made me determined to work hard to learn as much as I could.  Dissecting was also a new challenge; I think working in groups made it much more doable, though, and we were able to learn from each other.  My biggest piece of advice is to figure out your strengths within the group are and to stick to them when you work together.

Overall, first semester had some kinks in it, but the professors and fellow students really helped out.  I’m looking forward to going to classes with my classmates and learning new material that will build on the fundamentals we learned last semester.