How to Spend your Time before Starting Physical Therapy School

Name: Kelsie Jordan

Undergrad: Oregon State University

Hometown: Portland, OR

Fun Fact: I hiked Longs Peak the weekend before finals week (along with some other classmates – who needs to study, right?)

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Take a deep breath. Now, let it out slowly. Soak in this feeling of relief. At least for this moment, you have nothing to be stressed about – you actually are  accepted into physical therapy school. The applications are over, the interviews are complete, and you’ve survived that awful waiting period when your future was in the hands of an admissions team. Now, after what may have been a grueling process of endless pros and cons lists for some, you have finally decided which physical therapy program you are going to call your own. Doesn’t that feel amazing?

So…now what? Well, the good news is you’ve already done the hard part and this period between being admitted to PT school and actually starting is pretty much smooth sailing! Here’s what you can do to navigate this in-between time:

Study and review anatomy

Just kidding! Do not worry about reviewing anything. You’ll have the entirety of PT school to do all the studying your heart desires. You’ll also have a whole semester dedicated to learning anatomy, which will likely be much more in-depth than your undergraduate course, so looking over muscle attachments before starting school won’t give you any advantage. So please give your brain a break. Don’t review any material. Seriously. Don’t do it. Got it?

 

Graduate college

If you’re still finishing up your last year of undergrad, finish strong. Enjoy your last couple months of college, and then really enjoy your last true summer vacation. After all, you’ll have summer classes during PT school and afterward, you’ll be out in the real world!

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My mom and I at the Portland Shamrock Run 15K…it rained the entire time

Get in touch with your classmates

Most, if not all, programs have some sort of Facebook page for their incoming class. Join it! Introduce yourself, ask questions, creep on your classmates, etc. It’s always a little awkward trying to get to know people you haven’t met yet, but down the road, it’s always fun to share stories about first impressions of profile pictures with all your friends. Plus, this is a great way to find roommates, if you’re looking.

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Using extra free time to visit friends in Seattle.

Take care of logistics

Check your new school email regularly to make sure you stay in the loop by receiving all the updates and information regarding your cohort. There are probably a few compliance requirements you need to take care of, such as submitting immunization records and getting CPR certified. Also, don’t forget to apply for financial aid and scholarships – FAFSA is due on April 15th! Non-logistically, it might be a good idea to make a bucket list of things to do in your new home so that once you’re waist-deep in midterms, you don’t forget all the fun adventures you want to try.

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More hiking in Portland, just prepping for life in the Rockies.

Find housing/roommates

If you’re moving somewhere new for school, you obviously need to find somewhere to live. Again, if you’re looking to live with classmates, Facebook is a great tool. Zillow is also your best friend. Better yet, if you can swing it, try to visit the area so you can take a look at housing in person. I’ll say from personal experience that living close to campus is pretty great, but there are a lot of other factors that determine your ideal place to live. Definitely use current students as a resource because we all have varied experiences.

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A year without IM sports? Might as well join a city league team!

Sleep

Don’t set an alarm and instead sleep in on the weekends. There will be fewer opportunities for this in grad school, so sleep it up!

 

Spend time with your friends and family

If you’re moving away for school, you’re going to leave a lot of friends, family, and maybe even significant others behind. That doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll grow apart, but you’ll obviously have less time to spend with them. So before you move, do as many things as you can with all of those people! Maybe even plan ahead and figure out what you will do to keep in touch. Even if PT school is in the place you currently live, it does take a lot of work to balance your new schedule, new friends, new responsibilities, and new life with all the people in your old life. So make the effort to prioritize those people more than ever before you transition to grad school.

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My friends and I spent 4th of July weekend on a houseboat on Lake Billy Chinook in central Oregon.

Travel

Spend some time traveling, whether it’s to another country, another state, or just that one part of your hometown you’ve never been to before. While there are plenty of school breaks, those breaks won’t allow as much time or flexibility for travel as you have right now. Trust me, I’ve enjoyed a bunch of trips during PT school, but when there is an academic calendar to adhere to, vacation time tends to be a little more structured. Also, if you don’t feel like you have the time or money to take an extravagant trip, try to make a road trip out of your move to school. That’s what I did, and it was a blast!

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My extended family had a family reunion trip in South Carolina, so I had fun being a history nerd in Charleston

Have fun and honestly do whatever you want

Relax, take a breather, and let your brain rest (especially if you just finished undergrad). Even though there will be plenty of free time to explore and have fun during PT school, most of the time those experiences come alongside the knowledge of looming deadlines in the back of your mind, so enjoy the freedom to do what you want without anything making you feel like you need to study. Travel, sleep, drink at a beer festival, read a book, binge watch Netflix, go to a concert…If you currently have a job that you’re planning to leave right before grad school, think about leaving a few weeks early to unwind. Also, I would honestly advise that you not worry too much about saving up money – you’re already investing a lot in your education, and the couple hundred dollars that you might save by not enjoying your freedom right now won’t make much of a difference in the long run. This in-between time should be a period of rest and fun, so make that your goal.

Basically, all of that advice can be pretty much summed up into two words: do nothing.

Take care of the things you need to take care of to be compliant and financially prepared when you start school, but otherwise, just take a step back and enjoy your time however you see fit. As always, feel free to contact Erin, the Class of 2020 Admissions Representative, and I with any questions. Congratulations on finally reaching this step, and good luck in the Fall!

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“PT school, here I come!” –Me, when I finally got to Colorado.

My email address: kjordan002@regis.edu

Erin’s email address: elemberger@regis.edu

6 Weeks into PT School: Meet Kelsie Jordan

Name: Kelsie Jordan, Class of 2019
Hometown: Portland, OR
Undergrad: Oregon State University
Fun Fact: I spent the summer of 2014 studying in Salamanca, Spain.

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If I had to describe the first few weeks of PT school in one word, it would probably be “overwhelming.” I don’t even mean that in a negative way— so many of the experiences I’ve had so far have been amazing—but I would definitely not say it’s been easy. My classmates and I have been overwhelmed with both the excitement and nervousness to finally start this next part of our lives: in the past month, we’ve been introduced to a new school, new people, new homes, new habits, and—of course—with the amount of information we’ve received since the first day of classes.  More than anything else, though, I’ve been overwhelmed by all the new opportunities at my disposal and all the great people I get to spend the next three years with.

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Free concerts and NFL kick off!

You’d think that having a class of 81 people would make getting to know everyone difficult, but it’s been quite the opposite at Regis. It turns out that when you spend roughly 40+ hours per week with the same people who are in the exact same boat, you get to know a lot about each other in a very short amount of time. Of course, I obviously don’t know absolutely everyone well at this point, but it’s still easy to forget that we all met less than two months ago. Before deciding on Regis, I was a little apprehensive about having such a large class compared to other DPT programs; now that I’m here, I wouldn’t want it any other way.

The biggest piece of advice I’ve heard time and time again from the second and third year students is to take time for myself and have fun outside of school. I’ve definitely taken that advice to heart!   Perhaps that means I should be spending more of my free time studying, but hey, at least I’m having fun, right? I’ve managed to leave plenty of time for hiking, camping, sporting events, concerts, Netflix, and IM sports—and I’ve been having a blast! Being a successful student is all about maintaining balance between work and play, so those mental health breaks are important to me for keeping my brain from being overloaded.

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Hiking Horsetooth Mountain in Fort Collins

So exploring Colorado has been the easy part of transitioning to Regis—I mean, what’s not to love? Starting school again, on the other hand…I only took one year off between graduation and PT school, but it still took some transition time to remember how to take notes and study. Fortunately for me, a lot of the material so far has been familiar information from undergrad, though it’s definitely more intense. One of the aspects of the Regis DPT program that I really appreciate is the collaborative atmosphere.  Anyone—students and faculty alike—with a little more expertise in a certain area has been doing their best to share that information by providing extra resources, study sessions, etc. It also helps that we’ve all been embraced right into the Regis DPT community by the second and third years, and I definitely get the sense that the faculty genuinely care about our success in school and in our future careers.

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We’re official! Our new PT supplies after the Professional Ceremony

We’re now six weeks into PT school and sometimes I still have these moments where I can’t believe I’m actually here. It’s crazy to think back to this time last year when I still hadn’t even submitted my first PTCAS application, and now here I am: a student physical therapist. Overall, it feels like I’ve adjusted well to my new home in Denver as well as the grad student life—despite the overwhelming moments. Now that we’re through our first round of exams, it’s probably a safe bet that our “honeymoon phase” has come to a close and we have an increasingly busy schedule looming ahead. I’m still developing responsible study habits and I have a lot to learn about how to be a successful student, but I look forward to the upcoming opportunities for service, leadership, and classmate bonding that the rest of the semester will bring!

Time and Life Management in a DPT program: Meet Amy Medlock

 

Name: Amy Medlock, Class of 2017

Hometown: Grand Rapids, MI

Undergrad: University of Notre Dame

Fun Fact: My right thumb is 1 cm shorter than the left

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Finals week.  What a great time to be writing this post on time & life management.  PT school is demanding and can often feel overwhelming, but it does not have to take over your entire life. In addition to the responsibilities of school I am married, have two kids (Emma & Lyla), and I have to commute over one hour each day.  I have a secret though: since the end of my 2nd semester, I have not studied after 5pm or on weekends and my GPA is doing as well as ever. Shhh…Don’t tell our faculty!

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My family – Matt, Emma (7) and Lyla (4)

It is definitely not easy getting through a DPT program with extra responsibilities, but with the right discipline and support it is entirely possible. Since starting PT school there are a few tricks and tactics I have learned that may seem simple but have made it possible for me to keep my nights and weekends free for my family.

  1. Give yourself set hours – I arrive at school every day at 7am whether we start class at 8am or 1pm, and I leave everyday between 4:00p and 5:00p even if we get done with class earlier.
  2. Pay attention in class – This may seem obvious, but some people don’t do it.  If you look at people’s computers during lecture you’ll see people checking Facebook, playing Bubble Spinner or reading the news. To avoid becoming distracted by the ever present lure of Facebook or browsing the news, I sit in the front row to help keep my attention focused on taking notes. Class is valuable time that significantly reduces the amount of additional studying.
  3. Schedule everything – I start every week by scheduling out every day from when I am going to exercise, complete upcoming assignments, to when I can meet up with friends.  This keeps me accountable to my goals and keeps me from feeling like I have things hanging over my head or that I am forgetting something.
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A typical week in my life (minus my kids’ and husband’s events)

  1. Study when you study – Again, this might seem obvious, but it is really easy to get distracted by conversations, Facebook, Snapchat, etc. while studying. I have become very selective in the locations I will study and the people I will study with in order to maximize my study time.  I have also found people who are willing to drive down to the ‘burbs where I live on days when the demands of being a mom require that I stay closer to home (Thanks, Tane Owens!).
  2. Exercise & get outside – This helps me so much with feeling healthy, maintaining my energy and focusing while studying.  We are PTs, I don’t need to give all the reasons why this is a must! Being productive and efficient with my studies enables me to still live an active lifestyle.

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    Some of my activities outside of PT school

 

  1. Leave school at school – I understand that it is difficult for those that live with classmates but I avoid doing school work at home. I do my best to be present to my husband and kids whenever I am at home.  I am not saying that I am perfect at this, but I really do try.
  2. Stay involved – I have found ways to stay involved and active in both our academic program as well as our profession as a whole. Adding extra responsibilities and events further forces me to organize my time and priorities. I do not have time to procrastinate; therefore, I do not.
  3. Develop a support network – I feel so blessed to have a supportive and understanding husband who stays home with our kids when they are sick, makes dinner when I get stuck in traffic, and pushes me to be the best wife, mom and student that I can possibly be.  I also have amazing mom-friends who have my back when childcare falls through or when I need a glass of wine and movie night.

I have had to develop these strategies and practices out of necessity due to my responsibilities and commitments outside of PT school. But, we all have responsibilities and commitments outside of the classroom. I hope some of these pointers can help you to stay focused and stress-free(ish!) as you go through this vigorous program.

 

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Service and advocacy with my classmates and colleagues