Farewell Marcia Smith!

Name: Marcia Smith, PT, Ph.D.

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As we sadly said farewell at the end of the summer to another beloved faculty member, Marcia Smith, who has been with us at Regis for 20 years, second-year student Meg Kates made sure to catch some of her words of wisdom before her retirement! Read the interview below for Marcia’s amazing journey as a PT, educator, and advocator.

How did your journey with physical therapy begin?

When I was 8 or 9 years old, I read a story in a Reader’s Digest publication called Karen, which was the story of a young woman growing up with cerebral palsy in the late 1930s. At the time in history, many of those individuals lived in group facilities for people with disabilities. I remember, in the story, Karen learning how to walk with the help of a physical therapist. My interest was further reinforced in 8th grade, when I saw a television show called Route 66. In the show, main character came down with an illness and had to be hospitalized, and, I remember, a physical therapist helped him get well. Lastly, the gentleman who became the head of the Rehabilitation Center in Grand Junction moved across the street from me. I had lots of opportunities to talk to him and watch him. So, I had lots of opportunities for physical therapy to be reinforced as the career I wanted to pursue.

I graduated with by Bachelor’s in physical therapy from CU, and then I moved to upstate New York, where my husband went to law school. A Bachelor’s degree was all that was really available at the time, unless a person wanted to teach, in which case he or she got a Master’s degree. I had never met a physical therapist with a Ph.D. at the time. I lived in Ithaca for 3 years, and then I moved back Colorado in 1972. There were zero positions open in the state, so I worked vacation relief at nursing homes. Colorado has been saturated a long time. Eventually I got a call from the head therapist at Denver Health, who had heard I was looking for a job and asked me if I would like to interview…I said yes! I was hired and it was the weird, the wild, and the wonderful. At Denver Health, therapists are assigned to teams, so I worked in the Amputee Brace Clinic for 6 months. Then, I did hand therapy. Then, I rotated onto the Neuro-/Neurosurgery team. After that, I told everyone they could rotate around me because I was not going to leave that team.

Starting out, did you always know that you wanted to pursue neuro-focused PT?

No, in fact, I thought I wanted to be a pediatric therapist. In New York, I worked at Tompkins County Hospital and Rehabilitation Center for 2 years. That was a wonderful opportunity. I would see a patient who had an acute stroke and I would get to follow them from acute care to rehab to outpatient. I had the opportunity to fill the spot of a physical therapist on maternity-leave at the Special Children’s Center, which was a freestanding outpatient school in Ithaca. Interestingly, the head of the Special Children’s Center had her Ph.D. in Education and her Master’s in Speech Language Pathology. And she had cerebral palsy. In fact, she was one of the people in the book “Karen.” It was a full circle moment for me. I worked with this woman in the pediatric setting for 8 months before I moved back to Denver where, like I said, there were no pediatric positions. There were hardly any positions, but it was at Denver Health where I decided neuro is what I really wanted to do.

 

Can you tell me more about your experience with Ranchos Los Amigos?

When I was at Denver Health, I felt like I needed to know so much more. I expressed these feeling to my husband and he encouraged me to apply to universities for a Master’s degree. I was admitted to a program for clinical specialization at Rancho Los Amigos, where I learned at a couple of years. The first year was mostly class work, and the second year was all clinical specialization. We rotated between specialties, and I chose traumatic brain injury, stroke, TBI children, GB, and it just goes on like that.

 

What advice would you to someone who want to get into a specific specialty of work?

When I was finishing my Master’s, I can remember a classmate saying to me, “If there are no openings, I will just go do anything.”

And I can remember saying, “I won’t. I refuse. If I can’t be a neuro therapist, I will flip burgers!

So, my advice is to find a place you want to be and stick with it. Secondly, try to pick your final clinical rotation in a setting where you know you would like to practice. Lastly, don’t disregard what you have learned based on the setting you are in. For example, I have used my musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary skills in practice with my patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Always be searching for opportunities to use a wide breadth of skills and never putting people into a “box.”

 

What do you think is the next step for the career of physical therapy?

I think that we will always need educators. So, if you’re interested in that route, be considering in what subject you would like to get your Ph.D.

There are other things I worry about. I worry about the cost of education, and the loans that people have to take out. I see how physical therapists are reimbursed in Colorado and nationwide, and it’s hideous. So, I see residency taking us to another level, but, ultimately, we need to be addressed as primary care providers.

Ultimately, we need to be our own advocates. That means writing up clinical studies, asking questions, and answering questions.

 

What is the first step in becoming an advocate? How did you get your start?

When I lived in New York, there were two physical therapists at Ithaca College who would regularly invite me and some others to attend district meetings, and everyone would go. Then, in 1970, New York had its first state conference: that night, everyone volunteered to participate on a committee of the APTA. When I moved back to Colorado, one of my mentors invited me to a picnic, where she asked me if I would become the secretary of the Colorado APTA Chapter.

I asked her, “Do you think I can?”

She said, “Of course you can.”

So, I became the secretary and did that for 4 years before I moved to California to pursue my Master’s, where I continued to follow through with my responsibilities until I came back.

 

What’s the next step for you? What’s in your future?

I am going to continue to do some research. I am going to continue to answer some questions about how we dose exercise for people with Parkinson’s Disease.

I will be doing some traveling. In September, my husband and I will be escorting some friends to Ireland. I am going to see Iceland next. We are going to go for Hawaii for a few weeks, and, then I thought, since we are halfway there, why not go to New Zealand? Why fly back to the mainland? Then we have friends that we will be joining on a river trip on the Rhine. I don’t know after that!

 

Thank youMarcia, for your work and dedication to both Regis and our profession! We are so grateful for all of your contributions and will miss you very dearly at Regis, and we wish you all the best in your new adventure in life! Congratulations!

Farewell Tom McPoil!

Name: Thomas McPoil, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Hometown: Sacramento California

Fun fact: I like to play golf – at one point, I became a 10 handicapper

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As we approached the end of July, the Regis Physical Therapy family prepared to say goodbye to some very important members of our family. With heavy hearts, but happy smiles, we say our farewells to Tom McPoil and Marcia Smith, as they are retiring and moving on to new adventures. Following 45 years as a physical therapist, 35 years of teaching, and teaching over 1800 students in over 35 states, Tom sat down with me, and I asked for any last words of wisdom. Here’s what he had to say:

  1. How do you advise that we keep a life/work balance?

“I think it’s really hard. I think that’s going to be the hardest thing for a student to figure out. I just look at the struggles you face: you want time for your personal life and clinical care. You may have to stay late and do charting. You get home and you want a break, but you want to keep up with the literature. You are worried about debt and you are worried about loan repayment. If you can, set up a time where you can read 1 or 2 papers a week, and then maybe try to establish a couple of people that want to discuss them with you. Eventually, you have to come to grips with the incredible amount of research out there…I mean it’s almost too much. That’s where the systematic reviews come in. As a clinician you’re not going to have the time to read 27 articles, but you can read one paper that summarized 27 papers for you.”

  1. What makes the difference between a ‘good’ PT and a ‘great’ PT?

“I think that’s a hard question to address. Part of it has to be your feelings of confidence about yourself. Have confidence in yourself, you know a lot. So much is thrown at you, and so quickly, that you feel like you don’t know anything. But when you go out to clinic and you come back and talk to a first year, you realize how much you do know. I think the other thing that makes an exceptional therapist is one that will always question or ask, “what is happening? What is going on?” There is one person on your shoulder that tells you, “hey, have confidence in yourself.” But there should also be another person on the other shoulder that says, “hey, you’re still learning.” And because of that, you tend to be much more aware of things. The longer you are in clinic, the easier it is to say, “well it’s just another total knee.” You know the old ad, “it quacks like a duck, it walks like a duck, it must be a duck”…that to me is where you start to see the difference: a good therapist will just treat the patient, but the exceptional therapist is the one that says, “but really, is it a duck?” and takes the time to really look at those things. The person who is always striving to do their best is sometimes going the extra mile.”

  1. Because we are Regis, we are going to reflect a little bit. What are you taking away from your time at Regis?

“Some great memories from interacting with some great students, that’s number one. As a faculty member and physical therapist I am very, very blessed, because of the fact that the individuals who are drawn to physical therapy (I know I’m speaking in generalities) really care about helping people. And I think that’s just engrained in them. I think that as a result, they’re very interested in learning to help other people. That makes my job as a teacher and as an instructor much, much easier. I think that’s the thing that I’m taking away from Regis, and why I was really happy to come here. I love the fact that the values go beyond just getting an education. And yeah, they are Jesuit values, men and women for other, the cura personalis, the magis, all the buzzwords. But I really do think, here, as a faculty and as Regis, we really help instill that on our students and I think that as a result, the students that graduate from the Regis Physical Therapy program are better humans. I think they’re better people who are going to serve society. The thing here is the sense of community. What I’ve enjoyed as a faculty member is that I really do feel like I’m involved with a community that is very caring. They’re concerned about others. I mean, they’re taking those Jesuit values, but applying it to the whole university community. There is a sense of mission and the need for people to really help one another. One of the saddest things I had happened in my career was when we had a student die in a car accident four years ago. I tell you the afternoon we heard and I had to announced it to the second years, the response from this university was phenomenal. We had counselors down here, within an hour I was meeting with the president and the director of missions, we had a service for the students here on campus. I realize that would never have happened at any other institution I’ve ever been at. Yes, people would’ve been upset, but it’s that sense of community. Yes, we’re a part of physical therapy, but we’re all a part of Regis. That to me is the piece that I’ve really enjoyed the most, and I think we do a really good job getting our students to embrace that before they leave.”

  1. What is your biggest accomplishment as a teacher, a physical therapist, and in your personal life?

“Oh that’s a hard question to answer. Well in personal life, hopefully, I was a good husband, a good father, okay with my son-in-laws and an okay grandparent. That’s what you hope for. Ultimately, you hope that God thinks you did okay. What you really hope for is that in the really little time I had with students, I was able to install firstly knowledge that they needed to go out and be successful, but also hopefully I’ve provided some type of a good role model for them.”

  1. What are you going to do now that you’re retiring?

“I really want to do some volunteer work…that’s what I really want to do! I found out about Ignatian Volunteer Corp, which is for 55 years plus people. I’ll start out doing 8 hours a week, so I’m excited about that. I’ll like to go to Denver Health and help with the foot and ankle clinic. I’ll like to get back to playing golf and pickle ball. And I’ve got the 5 grandkids.”

  1. Where do you hope to see the profession go in 10 years?

“In the 45 years I’ve been in this profession, we’ve made huge strides. What I hope for with the profession is that we work to get increased reimbursement…I think that’s huge. We have to do more to convince the public that we are primary care providers. I hope that the future physical therapists will have direct access, that they’ll be recognized as a primary care providers for neuromusculoskeletal disorders, and that they’ll have the ability in their clinic to use diagnostic ultrasound.”

  1. Any last advice for our class?

Keep at it! Remember you have a lot of knowledge and a lot of information. Just try to balance things, and it’s not easy. Try to balance it so you don’t feel like you’re neglecting your personal life or your work.”

 

Thank you, Tom, for your dedication to the betterment of our profession. We will miss you very dearly at Regis, and we wish you all the best in your new adventure in life! Congratulations!

 

Tom also wanted to make sure that everyone knows he will have his Regis email, listed here (open forever) and it will be the best way to contact him. He will love to hear from people! tmcpoil@regis.edu

 

Written by: Pamela Soto, Class of 2019

Get ready for the 2018 Move Forward 5K/10K Race!

Name: Sarah Pancoast, Class of 2019

Undergrad: Regis University

Hometown: Evergreen, Colorado

Fun Fact: I own a 20-year-old, 9-foot Columbian Red Tail Boa Constrictor

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When race day arrives, you know that you have put in the necessary training for the day to be successful. Whether that is enjoying time with friends or other participants, being outside in the sun, shaving off some time or just getting exercise within the community. Any of those reasons create excitement as you cross the finish line! I will be honest and say that running is really not my forte… I only really “run” when it is required for a CrossFit workout. However, I have participated in the last four Move Forward races and have come to actually enjoy a 5K, in which I decrease my time each year. Someday I hope to tackle a 10K, so I can check it off my bucket list.

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Running with my pup, Star, in the 2017 Move Forward Race

 

The next Move Forward 5k/10k Race at Regis University, will be on September 22, 2018.

This race is hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and has been an annual event for 16 years! As Race Director, this is an important event for the DPT program, as we share our knowledge in how to live healthy lives, involve the community, and fundraise money for two extremely important foundations: Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine Companions is especially meaningful to Regis, as we have annual teams of students who assist in puppy raising before they are sent to train to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy helps support research in physical therapy for our future profession.

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Our goal this year is to fundraise $5,000. If you or you know of someone who would want to sponsor this race, we and our foundations would be extremely grateful! All money raised goes to the foundations listed above. Any amount goes a long way! You can access the donation page here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/donate

If you would like to sponsor this race, please email: moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com for more information.

 

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Zuma as a new pup! – she is training to be a service dog and is being raised by us, the School of Physical Therapy

 

This year we will be running a new course which follows the Clear Creek Trail system just down from campus. This means the 10K will be an out and back, not be a double of what the 5K has been in the past, so it’ll be something new and exciting! Anyone can run a 5K with practice, motivation and community involvement. If you need help, sign up for our Couch to 5K program to get you prepared for this fun event. Our goal is to get the community involved in exercise, learning to care for themselves, and most of all, to have fun!

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When we’re not training for Move Forward, we enjoy springtime on the Quad!

 

This event was created to get people to make healthy choices and get moving, so we can live an optimal life! Early morning bagels, fruit and coffee will be provided to get that extra boost before the race starts. On the count of 3, 2, 1…GO!! Walk, run, skip, hop or handstand walk your way to the finish line to enjoy burgers, hot dogs and beer. You deserve it after the hard work you have put in. Stick around after the race for music, yoga, water stations, vendors, and Canine Companions for Independence dogs to keep the day going. Don’t forget we will have a fun run for kids too, starting at 10:30 am.

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If you have not signed up for the race yet and you know you do not want to miss it, you can register here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/registration-1

 

The Move Forward Race will be held on September 22, 2018 and starts at 9:00am. If you have any further questions, please contact me at spancoast001@regis.edu.

Hope to see you out there!

 

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My first Thanksgiving 5K

Sarah Pancoast graduated with a B.S. in Health and Exercise Science from Regis University in 2015 and was once a competitive gymnast and has taught gymnastics from preschool to a USAG competitive level for 17 years. She currently owns her own massage therapy practice in Boulder, Colorado, Back to Balance Therapy. After finding she needed a new perspective on how the body functions, she enrolled in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Regis University and hopes to incorporate physical therapy with her massage therapy in the future. In her free time, Sarah likes to CrossFit, Olympic Weightlift, do jigsaw puzzles and hike with her dog, Star.

 

From the Office of Admissions:

In the upcoming weeks, you will periodically be receiving information and insight into our Doctor of Physical Therapy program. These blog posts contain great information to help you to learn about Regis, what makes our Physical Therapy program unique and why our graduates are sought-after professionals.

Regis University is known for developing learners as leaders in field of Physical Therapy. Meet the leaders making our DPT program one of the best in the nation!

Dr. Mark Reinking – Ph.D., PT, SCS, ATC – Dean of Physical Therapy & Professor

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            Dr. Reinking brings almost 30 years of experience in PT and Athletic Training. Besides being a licensed physical therapist, Dr. Reinking is also a certified athletic trainer and clinical specialist in sports physical therapy. Dr. Reinking’s primary teaching is musculoskeletal examination and rehabilitation and sports physical therapy. Dr. Reinking also has over twenty peer-reviewed publications and is fascinated by research on risk factors for overuse injuries in athletes. While Dr. Reinking continues to serve in multiple leadership roles in organizations such as the ACAPT and APTA, he has always been a teacher at heart.

Dr. Cheryl Burditt Footer, PT, Ph.D. – Assistant Dean & Associate Professor

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            Cheryl Burditt Footer brings over 26 years of physical therapy experience to the program.  Dr. Footer plays an integral part in teaching her areas of expertise in neurological management courses and in our global health program. Dr. Footer’s scholarly interests are deeply rooted in examination and intervention strategies for children with neuromuscular disorders, evaluating models for student decision making for the client with a neuromuscular condition, and evaluating outcomes of global health immersion programs. Not only does she continue this research with Regis, but she is also engrained in the Global Health Committee working to foster sustainable community partnerships in Ethiopia, Peru and Nicaragua.

Dr. Ira Gorman, PT, Ph.D., MSPH.  – Assistant Dean & Associate Professor

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            Ira Gorman came aboard in 1994 and has been an asset to Regis University since the beginning. Dr. Gorman has been driving the field of PT forward by being one of the first APTA-credentialed clinical instructors in Colorado as well as owning and operating an outpatient practice. Dr. Gorman has progressed healthcare reform and injury prevention with his research on the effect of built environment on childhood physical activity and obesity. Dr. Gorman is the clinical director of the DPT program’s on-campus faculty practice, a part of Regis Neighborhood Health as well as many roles throughout the APTA. Dr. Gorman has also been recognized by the Colorado chapter of the APTA as an Outstanding Physical Therapist (2005) and by the national APTA with the Lucy Blair Service Award (2012).

Stay tuned. More great Regis information coming your way soon!

Recent Physical Therapy News: HERE.

P.S. We expect interview decisions to be sent next week.

Blog post from Zachary Lundquist, Admissions Counselor