The 2017 Move Forward 5K/10K Race

Name: Laura Baker, Class of 2018
Undergrad: University of New Hampshire, Durham
Hometown: Seville, Ohio
Fun Fact: I spent a year as an intern for the School for Field Studies in Queensland, Australia! I drove students around on the “wrong” side of the road, went on bird counting outings at 3 am, pet boa constrictors with professional herpetologists, went diving on the Great Barrier Reef, and raised lots and lots of seedlings in a rainforest nursery.

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On the cool, rainy morning of September 16th, a group of 160 racers participated in the 2017 Move Forward 5k/10k Race at Regis University. This race, hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program, has been an annual event for 15 years. The event serves as a fundraiser for Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy.

This year, a particular hiccup early in the planning stages for the race gave us a challenge. Changes in city park regulations caused a significant course change towards Berkeley Lake Park rather than the usual course through Rocky Mountain Lake Park. The racers took to the starting line in Boettcher Commons at Regis. Upon hearing the go command from the 2017 race director, Ryan Bourdo, they ran through the Berkeley neighborhood and around Berkeley Lake. The sun came out as they raced back up the big hill to Regis. The 10k racers turned just shy of the finish line and raced the route a second time.

We appreciate all of the racers who ran this new (hilly!) course and the Denver Police Department who kept the racers and community members safe at every intersection. After their run/walk, participants and family members enjoyed barbecue and a beer garden and activities including volleyball, yoga, and Bungee Bootcamp.

A committed group of DPT students, faculty, and Regis staff supported this undertaking. The DPT Class of 2018 will be passing on the baton to the Class of 2019 to take the Move Forward race and to make it their own. Each person listed below worked with many individuals, including students in the DPT Class of 2019, toward creating a successful event:

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Ryan Bourdo served as the 2017 race director, fearless leader, and created a marketing presence.

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Rachel Maass worked hard to gather sponsors while Becca Brunson performed community outreach and organized the first aid response.

Ryan Tollis was our website and registration wizard who worked to make the registration process smooth and accessible.

Amy Renslo spent many hours planning out the post-race activities while Taylor Skelton played a key role making for a fun day all around.

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Bri Henggeler provided volunteer coordination with support from Tara Businski who wrangled many volunteers as course marshals, including Regis University baseball team and alumni from Duke University.

The design and course lay-out was done by myself; with Miranda Paasche planning and organizing the course set up for race-day.

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Claire Molenaar, Brett Barnes and Michael Lofboom ensured that water stations were well stocked and ran smoothly.

Our announcer, Michael Young, was a hit. Although Michael is on his way to becoming a physical therapist, he was so good at announcing that he ought to ponder this activity as a second job!

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We also wish to thank our impromptu photographer, James Liaw; and bicycle leads for the racers, Chris Lew and Christian Quijano, for their time and willingness help.

Part of the success of this race can be attributed to those who provided advice and administrative support from the DPT faculty and staff, including Alice Davis, Faun Lee, and Gemma Hoeppner. We also want to thank all staff from Regis who helped us prepare for race day including individuals from Physical Plant, RU Parking, Events Services, Campus Security, and Student Activities. Finally, we wish to thank all of our sponsors as we couldn’t have this event without you!

More photos taken by Laura are coming soon.

5 Ways to Make Your Summer Last Longer

Name: Evan Piché, Class of 2018
Undergrad:
 Colorado State University
Graduate: 
Masters in Public Policy
Fun Fact: 
I’m an ordained minister (thanks, Universal Life Church).
Hometown:
Holyoke, MA

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The air is starting to get crisper, your neighbors are raking the first leaves into huge piles that just beg to be jumped into, Instagram posts contain things like #pumpkinspice, and–of course–decorative gourds are beginning to make their annual appearance on countertops everywhere. Soon we will perform the yearly ritual of enjoying one extra hour of sleep in exchange for enduring six months of perpetual darkness.

Lamentably, summer is drawing to a close. Skiers and snowboarders are understandably stoked. But even football fans and snow-sport enthusiasts must acknowledge the bittersweet mood that accompanies the changing of seasons as we collectively bid farewell to flip-flops, sundresses, grilling, swimming, drinking margaritas on the porch, and falling asleep in a hammock. If you are like me—still wearing sandals and denying the inevitability of winter—or you just want to make the most of these final few precious days of summer-like weather (while also avoiding adult responsibility), you will find the following tips useful:

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#pumpkinspice

1. Watch the Sunset with a Beverage

This is self-explanatory. The sun typically sets in the west (if you’re directionally challenged, and reside in the Front Range, look towards the mountains) sometime between 7:00 o’clock and it’s-way-too-early-for-it-to-be-dark-already o’clock. Sunsets pair well with beer. The type/brand of beer doesn’t matter so much; just about any beer will taste good when enjoyed outdoors. Can or bottle? Doesn’t matter. Actually, the beer isn’t even the important part; this will work with Coke, or tea, or V8 juice, or whatever. The important part is the sunset.

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Sunset-beers with anatomy lab group

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Enjoying sunset-beers in Zion

2. “Food Poisoning”

Autumn is a great time to stay home sick with “that gnarly stomach bug that’s been going around” and go do something fun outside (*Editor’s note: for the responsible student, skip to #3). It’s starting to get dark earlier and earlier with each passing day; you can’t realistically be expected to go mountain biking after class when the sun sets at 4pm. I can’t condone faking sick, but if you do decide to head up to the mountains for a hike instead of going to class, make sure your fabricated illness is embarrassing/gross enough that no one will dare question you. Food poisoning is a personal favorite—it’s extremely common, utterly plausible, and no one likes to ask probing questions about that kind of stuff.

Bonus Tip: The phrase “it’s coming out both ends” and adjectives like “explosive” and “violent” should be sprinkled in liberally as they will lend credibility to your story. This is important to ensure that the legitimacy of your “illness” will not be questioned. Fall is a great time to hike to Bierstadt Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park while recovering from your unfortunate gastrointestinal distress.

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Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park

 

3. Ride Your Bike to Nowhere in Particular…But Make Sure to Get Ice Cream While You Do It

Perhaps you can’t justify skipping class (*responsible students, continue reading here). Fair enough. Maybe an afternoon of avoiding studying and reconnecting with your childhood is more your level of procrastination. Have you ever ridden your bike to Sweet Cow at 2:00 pm to “study?” No?! Try it sometime! After stuffing your face, spend an hour or so just cruising around the block on your bike and embrace that feeling of being twelve again.

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High Lonesome Trail in Nederland, CO

4. Camp

Myth: camping season runs from Memorial Day Weekend to Labor Day Weekend.

Fact: those are actually the starting and ending dates of white-pants-wearing season for people who own white pants.

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Camping in Zion

5. Drive Around with Your Windows Rolled Down While Doing That Airplane Thing with Your Hand

How many hours did you spend driving around this summer with the windows down, blasting 90’s Hip-Hop/Dixie Chicks and pretending your hand is an airplane? Quite clearly, you did not spend an adequate amount of time engaging in this activity. Today, after class, hop in your car, crank up the stereo to that obnoxiously loud volume that makes things in your car vibrate and take a drive to absolutely nowhere.

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Cruising around (and climbing) in Crested Butte, CO

Since the author is approaching 30, and therefore not “hip” to what the “kids” are grooving to these days, I will suggest a few classic summer anthems that are sure to enhance the stoke level:

-I Believe I Can Fly – R. Kelly (pre-weirdness)
-Wide Open Spaces – The Dixie Chicks
-Born to Run – Bruce Springsteen
-Boys of Summer – Eagles
-Milkshake – Kelis
-Pretty much anything by Prince, David Bowie, or Snoop-Dog/Lion

These are only suggestions. I encourage you to be imaginative and creative in your recreational procrastination.

Regis DPT Summer Semester: How to Stay Motivated and Have Fun

When most Coloradans flip their calendars from April to May, they smile and ponder the period of peaceful transition that lies ahead: flowers bloom, the sun warms the pristine mountain lakes, spring turns to summer.

First year physical therapy students, likewise, anticipate a time of transition—albeit a bit more abrupt! Regis PT students undergo finals in the first week of May, and once that is conquered, one glorious week of break ensues. Many students take advantage of the time off by visiting family, traveling, or enjoying the many pleasures of Denver while allowing their usually overflowing minds to be idle. They return a week later to a relatively bare campus (3rd years are graduated, 2nd years are on clinical, and undergraduates have scattered) as true rulers of the roost.

The 3rd semester of PT school is—dare I say—a time of reprieve. Courses shift focus from foundational sciences to instead hone in on management. Although this involves much more time spent in class/labs, students are expressing joy in finding more time out of class to devote to recreational pursuits…and no better place exists, in my humble opinion, than beautiful Colorado for making a memorable third semester! I could probably write an entire brochure on the prodigious amount of adventures to be had in the Denver area, but below I’ve highlighted just a few activities for Regis students seeking to make the most of their budding summer.

1. Survive spring finals.

Stay passionate, study for neuroscience, and victory is assured.

2. Take advantage of your break.

In the first 2 semesters, PT students put their hearts into every academic excursion they undertake (anatomy dissection, manual skills checks, service learning, etc.), so by the time summer rolls around, they’ve earned every second of their time off. I urge students to use that time to be self-serving. If you miss your family, go home. If you long to travel, rally your buddies and hit the road. If you need to sit on the couch and eat donut holes, start researching TV series to binge watch now.

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Regis SPTs strike a pose on their vacation in Zion National Park.

3. Relax at Coors Field.

Rockies games are shockingly affordable, and you can’t beat the baseball park atmosphere.

4. Camp.

Gather your classmates on Friday after class and head for Rocky Mountain National Park. Physically getting away on the weekends is an ideal way to recharge (plus: s’mores).

5. Check out the brewery scene.

Denver is a beer lover’s wonderland. Enthusiasts can walk among 20 breweries in LoHi alone: Denver Brewing Co., Great Divide, Wynkoop, Vine Street Pub, and Breckenridge are just a few favorites.

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Once you graduate from brewery tours, get a history lesson at Stranahan’s Whiskey Distillery.

6. Take regular night hikes.

As nights grow balmier, head out to Boulder to traverse the trails in Chautauqua Park and get a stunning view of both the stars and city lights.

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The mountains are a prime location for appreciating some moonscapes.

7. Reflect on the past year and what lies ahead.

The life of a student physical therapist is a beautiful struggle. After your first year, don’t forget to take the time to consider everything you’ve learned, how much you’ve grown, and the divine opportunities that await you.

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Blogger: Meg Kates

Apart from blogging, Meg (Class of 2019) is a member of the social media committee for the Move Forward race, a member of the Foot and Ankle Special Interest Group, and was Boss of the Applesauce in April (this is a big deal). Her current goal after graduating is to work in an outpatient neuro rehab facility.

 

April Recap: 3rd Annual Talent Show

April is one of the busiest months for PT students! Whether it’s your first or last year, it’s a time of studying, planning your future, and–of course–a time to get to know your classmates even better.

First and Second Years:

Somehow, between all of the practicals, midterms and class, our first and second years had time to come together for the 3rd Annual Talent Show! It was a refreshing reminder that we’re more than just students: we all have other talents and interests that keep us fresh and focused in the classroom.  There was both a performance and visual arts competition; prizes included gift cards to REI (we are in Colorado, of course!) and tickets for a whitewater rafting trip, to a TEDx weekend, and to Cirque du Soleil!

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Special thanks to:

Organizers: Kimi Bengochea and Michael Young

MC: Michael Young

Team: Lydia Hamstra, Brianna Henggeler, Ashley King, and Rachel Maass

Funding: Dave Law, the Director of Student Activities

Watch the talent show in its entirety online! 

Part 1 * Part 2Part 3 * Part 4 * Part 5 *

Third Years: 

The third years wrapped up their LAST clinical rotation, most took the NPTE (fingers crossed!), and now they are presenting their capstone and research presentations before graduation next weekend. Congrats, almost grads!

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Some third years (and other SPTs and PTs) finishing off their 3-month clinical with their advisor, Shelene Thomas (left)

Blogger: Carol Passarelli