Get ready for the 2018 Move Forward 5K/10K Race!

Name: Sarah Pancoast, Class of 2019

Undergrad: Regis University

Hometown: Evergreen, Colorado

Fun Fact: I own a 20-year-old, 9-foot Columbian Red Tail Boa Constrictor

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When race day arrives, you know that you have put in the necessary training for the day to be successful. Whether that is enjoying time with friends or other participants, being outside in the sun, shaving off some time or just getting exercise within the community. Any of those reasons create excitement as you cross the finish line! I will be honest and say that running is really not my forte… I only really “run” when it is required for a CrossFit workout. However, I have participated in the last four Move Forward races and have come to actually enjoy a 5K, in which I decrease my time each year. Someday I hope to tackle a 10K, so I can check it off my bucket list.

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Running with my pup, Star, in the 2017 Move Forward Race

 

The next Move Forward 5k/10k Race at Regis University, will be on September 22, 2018.

This race is hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and has been an annual event for 16 years! As Race Director, this is an important event for the DPT program, as we share our knowledge in how to live healthy lives, involve the community, and fundraise money for two extremely important foundations: Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine Companions is especially meaningful to Regis, as we have annual teams of students who assist in puppy raising before they are sent to train to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy helps support research in physical therapy for our future profession.

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Our goal this year is to fundraise $5,000. If you or you know of someone who would want to sponsor this race, we and our foundations would be extremely grateful! All money raised goes to the foundations listed above. Any amount goes a long way! You can access the donation page here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/donate

If you would like to sponsor this race, please email: moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com for more information.

 

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Zuma as a new pup! – she is training to be a service dog and is being raised by us, the School of Physical Therapy

 

This year we will be running a new course which follows the Clear Creek Trail system just down from campus. This means the 10K will be an out and back, not be a double of what the 5K has been in the past, so it’ll be something new and exciting! Anyone can run a 5K with practice, motivation and community involvement. If you need help, sign up for our Couch to 5K program to get you prepared for this fun event. Our goal is to get the community involved in exercise, learning to care for themselves, and most of all, to have fun!

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When we’re not training for Move Forward, we enjoy springtime on the Quad!

 

This event was created to get people to make healthy choices and get moving, so we can live an optimal life! Early morning bagels, fruit and coffee will be provided to get that extra boost before the race starts. On the count of 3, 2, 1…GO!! Walk, run, skip, hop or handstand walk your way to the finish line to enjoy burgers, hot dogs and beer. You deserve it after the hard work you have put in. Stick around after the race for music, yoga, water stations, vendors, and Canine Companions for Independence dogs to keep the day going. Don’t forget we will have a fun run for kids too, starting at 10:30 am.

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If you have not signed up for the race yet and you know you do not want to miss it, you can register here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/registration-1

 

The Move Forward Race will be held on September 22, 2018 and starts at 9:00am. If you have any further questions, please contact me at spancoast001@regis.edu.

Hope to see you out there!

 

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My first Thanksgiving 5K

Sarah Pancoast graduated with a B.S. in Health and Exercise Science from Regis University in 2015 and was once a competitive gymnast and has taught gymnastics from preschool to a USAG competitive level for 17 years. She currently owns her own massage therapy practice in Boulder, Colorado, Back to Balance Therapy. After finding she needed a new perspective on how the body functions, she enrolled in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Regis University and hopes to incorporate physical therapy with her massage therapy in the future. In her free time, Sarah likes to CrossFit, Olympic Weightlift, do jigsaw puzzles and hike with her dog, Star.

 

How Can the APTA Help Me?

Name: Lina Kleinschmidt

Undergrad: Pacific University

Hometown: Stuttgart, Germany

Fun fact: I was born and raised in Stuttgart, Germany

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As a physical therapy student and future physical therapist, the APTA is something you will hear about over and over again. With job opportunities, continuing education classes, research updates and legislation information, the APTA has endless amounts of information at the hands of students and professionals. However, the website and all the resources may seem a little overwhelming. Therefore, here is a little introduction into the APTA and how you can use it to further your education and career.

What is the APTA?

The APTA, or the American Physical Therapy Association, is a professional organization that represents physical therapy students, physical therapists and physical therapy assistants and has over 103,000 members. It is divided into state chapters each with a governing board. We at Regis University are fortunate to have Cameron MacDonald as an assistant professor, and he is the current president of the Colorado chapter which currently has 2,700 members. It is vital for each state to have a chapter since each state has different practice guidelines and thus must have individual legislation.

There are also sections within the APTA, which include: acute care, aquatics, cardiovascular and pulmonary, education, federal, geriatrics, hand and upper extremity, home health, pediatrics, private practice and quite a few others.  These sections allow you as a student or current PT to learn more information about different specialties. For example, I am part of the neurology section and as such, I get quarterly journals that inform me on the latest research and new updates in the realm of neurology and how it affects the physical therapy industry.

Districts are even smaller groups which are broken up by geographical location and each chapter has SIGs or special interest groups. Colorado has five statewide SIGs which include: Colorado Acute/Rehab SIG, Pediatric SIG, Private Practice SIG, PTA SIG and the Student SIG.

Continuing education (CE) classes happen often and allow students or PTs/PTAs to learn more about a specific topic and have hands on practice. I attended a vestibular and concussion CE class last fall and it completely opened my eyes to a world of physical therapy I had never heard of before. The APTA has a national conference called Combined Sections Meeting, or CSM, which is an incredible opportunity to learn about the profession and what new research developments are forthcoming. CSM is also a great way to network and get to know other practitioners in the physical therapy profession. The Colorado Chapter also has an annual convention called the Fall Convention & Expo.

How can I use the APTA?

Now that you have an introduction, it is important to know what you can do NOW. Depending on where you are in your journey, this may be different for each of you. If you are currently applying to PT school, the APTA website can help guide you in preparing for your interview questions, help you understand what is in your scope of practice depending on the state and school you apply to, and impress the faculty by understanding what is happening in the PT profession.

As you start your graduate school career, the first step is to become an APTA member! Some graduate programs require it, others do not. Either way, I highly recommend you become part of the association so you can reap the full benefits of the APTA and have your voice heard. Click here for joining the APTA. Attending state and national conventions will also give you a huge head start on understanding what the real world of physical therapy is like and they are a great chance to meet students from all over the US and also network!  The easiest step is to get involved with SIGs. Each university will have student special interest groups which hold meetings and special guest lecturers which allow students to connect and communicate about a specific PT specialty.

At Regis and CU Denver, we have multiple sSIGs that our students are involved in and I am lucky enough to be involved with the APTA sSIG this year. I will be working closely with the other sSIGs as well as the PTA schools to have a year of amazing events for our students. We hope to open their eyes to all the opportunities in Colorado. These include: panels about specialties and what to do after graduation, a kickball tournament, a national advocacy dinner and so much more!

Yes, this was a lot of information. No, I do not expect anyone to remember it all. But it is important that you get involved and find what you are passionate about. So now, go to www.apta.org and become a member today!

Getting Involved in PT School: Student Sports SIG

Name: Candace Townley, Class of 2018
Undergrad:
 Nebraska Wesleyan University
Graduate:
MA in Sports Performance, Regis University
Hometown:
Thornton,CO
Fun Fact:
I collect ducks: rubber ducks, stuffed ducks, all ducks.

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Candace is currently a third year at Regis. She is a certified athletic trainer, has her master’s in sports performance, and institutionalized the Student Sports Special Interest Group at Regis.

Why did you decide to come to Regis to become a physical therapist?

My journey at Regis University began in the Summer of 2013 (almost 5 years ago, eeeek!!!) when I was hired as a Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer for the Regis University Athletic Department. I had just graduated from a small school in Nebraska, moved back home to Colorado, was going to officially pursue my master’s degree, and was assigned to the women’s volleyball and softball teams as their athletic trainer. Life officially could not have gotten any better. My next 2 years were filled with early morning conditioning sessions, mid-day treatment sessions, countless orthopedic appointments, late evening practices, nail-biting competitions, and frequent airport trips for away games. I traveled weekly, visiting different states to multiple NCAA Division II tournaments (and who can forget annual softball tournaments to Las Vegas and that trip to Europe with the volleyball team when they competed in an international world tour). My workplace’s unbelievable atmosphere made it feel less like work and more like home. I can honestly say those were some of the best times of my life. (Thus far ;))

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Although very happy with my career as an athletic trainer, the “magis” in me sought for more; I wanted to further develop an understanding of sport-specific movements and techniques to better tailor therapeutic interventions accordingly based on kinematic and kinetic, sport-specific demands. With that in mind, I decided to apply to PT school…and ended up joining the Regis DPT Class of 2018.

Fall 2015 as a DPT student was unlike the previous couple years. I had to say goodbye to my athletes, the athletic department, and to athletic training for a while. Still, though, I was excited: I was going to become a sports physical therapist.

Did you regret this career adaptation?

Initially, yes. Absolutely. Stepping away from athletic training was far harder than I ever could have imagined. I missed everything. I missed two-a-days. I missed the athletes, the coaches, the athletic department, and–especially–the atmosphere. Water bottles were replaced with books, athletic tape for highlighters, the gym and dugout for the library, and my athletic training kit traded in for a backpack big enough to carry around Portney & Watkins. During my first semester, I felt lost and as though something was missing. Instead of drowning in injury reports and insurance paperwork, I was drowning in biomechanics, anatomy, and—let’s not forget—critical inquiry (our statistics class)! So, what did I do? I scheduled a meeting with my advisor, Dr. Mark Reinking. I explained to him my concerns, sadness, and questions of whether PT school was truly for me. Mark never doubted my existence or survival in the DPT program but instead suggested that I find something that would relight the fire in my heart and remind me why I came to PT school: to excel in sports rehabilitation. We discussed inviting a speaker to come in, the Assistant Athletic Trainer for the Denver Broncos, Dustin Little, to speak to our class. That was how and when the Regis University Sports sSIG was born!

So…What is the Sports sSIG?

The Regis Student Sports Special Interest Group is a great way to stay up-to-date with current issues and hot topics in the world of sports physical therapy. We meet once a month to discuss various topics and current events. After officially starting the Regis University Sports sSIG in Spring 2016, we have welcomed guest speakers and presenters such as:

  1. Dustin Little: My Journey to the NFL: Denver Broncos Assistant Athletic Trainer & Physical Therapist
  2. Patty Panell: Differential diagnosis: The most important tool in tennis training
  3. Brian Briggs: Revo Physiotherapy Sports Lab; advanced technology in the clinic
  4. Sarah Reinking: Sports Residencies: The need to know.
  5. Lacrosse C-Spine Injury: A video and discussion of on field management
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Dr. Mark Reinking goes into the intricacies of lacrosse injuries

Where is the Sports sSIG is going?

As I will be graduating in the Spring with high hopes for the future of the Sports sSIG, I’m excited to announce that we have implemented a Sports sSIG Executive Council to serve as the oversight team for scheduling various events and organize activities for the sSIG.

Meet your new representatives: Blake Miller and Bridget End

Both Blake and Bridget are members of the Regis University Class of 2019 and have interest and ties to sports physical therapy and will serve on your Sport sSIG Executive Council.

What are some upcoming events for the Sports sSIG?

After our first year of meetings and creating an executive council, we are very excited for upcoming events and Sport sSIG meetings. Current scheduled discussions include:

  1. September 19, 12-1 pm: Teresa Schuemann: Rehab of the high level athlete
  2. Wednesday October 25, 6-7:30pm: Liz Amuchastegui: Former Regis DPT Grad: Swimming Biomechanics with supplemental lab session covering corrective swimming exercise techniques
  3. November TBD:  Jason Poole: Ultra-Endurance Runner

Anything else in the pipeline?

Whatever you guys are interested in! If there’s a crazy gruesome football injury this fall and you want to meet and discuss it with some faculty over a lunch, let’s do it! If you’re interested in circus and acrobatic physical therapy, let us know! I look forward to seeing many more of you at future meetings!

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Third year Nolan Ripple leads a lunchtime spin workout

Class of 2020: Interested in becoming the Class of 2020’s representative on Sports sSIG Executive Council? Email me at ctownley@regis.edu.

 

Student Involvement in the Colorado APTA

The faculty at Regis strongly encourages leadership from its students because it knows that those who care enough to be the change they want to see move our profession forward. Rest assured that over the course of your time at Regis there are many opportunities, both formal and informal, to either try leadership for the first time or to grow your current skillset. One of those ways is to become involved in the Student Special Interest Group for the Colorado Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association, (CO APTA sSIG for short).

I am the current 2016-2017 Chair of the CO APTA sSIG and a third year student in the Regis DPT program, and I would like to say something to those of you considering if the Regis DPT program is right for you, to the first years are who are about to embark on their first semester, and to the second years about to experience their first clinical rotation: you can do more than you think you can.

Running for a position on the CO APTA sSIG is an amazing way to broaden your perspective on what students of Physical Therapy, both Student Physical Therapists and Student Physical Therapist Assistants, are all about. The current board has 10 positions (http://coloradophysicaltherapists.org/student-sig/), and this year we are focusing on the following areas:

  • Creating a framework-for-action for the 2017-2018 sSIG
  • Growing student involvement with the APTA across the state through education and outreach
  • Building networking opportunities amongst students as well as between students and current professionals
  • Advocating for student issues at the state and federal level
  • Fundraising

With growing communication between APTA sSIGs across the nation, this is an exciting time to be involved. Aligning the sSIG with the CO APTA Chapter’s strategic plan provides a built in way to move forward, but there is plenty of room to grow new projects.

In the spring of 2017, we will be holding elections for the 2017-2018 CO APTA sSIG board. If you are interested in pushing yourself a little further, I encourage you to run for office, to use this as an opportunity to broaden your perspective beyond the next exam, and to begin shaping the future as a leader.

 

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