Presenting At CSM 2019, Washington D.C.

It was a cold, rainy national Combined Sections Meeting (CSM) this year in Washington D.C., but that did not stop almost 17,000 people, including several from Regis University, to attend! Regis students and faculty not only learned the latest happenings from others in our field of physical therapy, but also took roles in presenting their research and/or speaking during educational sessions to inform our profession. Below are some highlights of their experiences.

 

 

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DPT students Amber Bolen and Grace-Marie Vega with Dr. Andrew Littmann

“Going to CSM as a student researcher was a wonderful experience! Discussing our narrative review with PTs, students, and other researchers who shared our passion for regenerative medicine will always stand out as a highlight of my time at Regis.” — Grace-Marie Vega

“I loved working as a team with my research partner on our narrative review (the PT’s role in stem cell research for spinal cord injury). Presenting research at CSM was something I never expected to do when I first entered PT school, but Regis faculty encouraged our class to submit for review. We decided to give it a shot and we made it! Being able to speak with people interested in our field of research was an amazing feeling. We even attended a lecture in which one of our cited authors was present. It was also humbling to see how many research posters and lectures came out of Regis and its faculty and students. I look forward to seeing more as a proud future alumni!” — Amber Bolen

 

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DPT students David Cummins and Katherine Heller with Dr. Andrew Smith and Dr. Denise O’Dell

“Attending CSM in Washington, D.C. was an amazing experience. I had the opportunity to share my team’s research, chat with leaders in the profession, and meet dozens of potential employers. The energy and passion at the conference was infectious and I left feeling reinvigorated and excited about the future of our profession.” — David Cummins

 

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DPT students Hannah Clark, Vivian He, Felix Hill, and Erin Lemberger with Dr. Karla Bell, Dr. Melissa Hoffman, and Dr. Nancy Mulligan

“I think that getting to present an educational session at CSM is a fairly rare opportunity, and our team definitely bonded through the intimidating experience of presenting to almost 300 people! In presenting our research on LGBTQ+ related cultural competency, we were also able to identify barriers and build broader awareness of LGBTQ+ issues in our profession. I feel so grateful to our lead researcher, Dr. Melissa Hoffman, for getting me involved in research and making it possible for us all to have this experience!

In addition to the educational session, many members of our research team are involved in PT Proud, an LGBTQIA+ committee in the Health Policy Administration Section of the APTA. As part of that group, we held a membership meeting and happy hour event, which provided a powerful space for LGBTQ+ people and allies in our profession to come together.” — Felix Hill

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Pam Soto, a third year DPT student, presented a platform on “The Impact of Leadership Development Curriculum Through the Eyes of the Physical Therapy Student.”

 

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Class of 2018 graduate Dr. Amanda Rixey presented on preferred method of feedback after simulation experiences for DPT students.

 

And even more!

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Mental Health Wellness in DPT School

Name: Abbey Ferguson

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With all of its incredible opportunities, graduate school, especially a doctorate program, also brings a new amount of stress and anxiety. It is a pressure cooker for bringing out both the best and the worst in us, and as my first year came to a close, I found myself drowning in mental illness and anxiety. I realized I wasn’t alone as we embraced vulnerability in our summer Psychosocial Aspects of Health Care class, and many of us found the courage to admit how exhausted we were with life, finding relief in common ground.

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We are literally on a common ground 🙂

Our Psych-Soc. class was one of the many resources I began to take advantage of in order to regain mental wellness. Regis’ counseling center provided free counseling, all of the advisors had their doors open, and with time many of my classmates became close friends as we continually showed support for each other. However, there was still a nagging sense that I couldn’t pursue full wellness in our program without bringing some sort of awareness to mental health issues that permeated our program.

 

When I was 19, I was diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa. After years of treatment, bouncing in and out of recovery, I arrived at Regis ill-prepared to ward off another relapse. Being in a healthcare field is difficult as an individual trying to fight health and diet culture which often triggers eating disorder behavior. I found myself getting angry with some of the comments people would say or the culture that was fostered in the general population, and I felt helpless.

 

However, thanks to the community at Regis and within our DPT program, I was encouraged to do something about my feelings of anger and helplessness. I began to formulate an education program to advocate for those in recovery from eating disorders, and to educate the program on how to foster a less triggering environment. We had one of Regis’s counselors come and speak about the language health-care providers use and how these words can affect an individual’s perception about themselves. We also had a panel of three second-year DPT students who shared their own experiences recovering from an eating disorder in graduate school.

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I was overwhelmed by the support. As I looked out at the crowd that had showed up to my small education session, I grew misty-eyed and almost cried in front of everyone. My frustration dissipated, and  I was instead filled with pride for the program I am a part of. Fellow students asked questions, attempted to understand, and showed overwhelming empathy as the session continued. After the session, dozens of fellow DPT students came up to me, expressing similar experiences of recovery and wanting to continue the conversation. Weeks later, another DPT student came up to me at our national conference in New Orleans, excited and passionate about the topic and wanting to team up with me to advocate for mental health as well. I found it encouraging and exciting to see like-minded, future health care professionals so interested in becoming more familiar with these issues in order to properly care for individuals plagued by these illnesses.

 

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There is no question: graduate school is hard. It is intense, exhausting, and often times it feels like I am just crawling along. But, I have never been more thankful to be a part of a program that allows its students to own their mental health by advocating and educating the community.