April Recap: National Advocacy Dinner

Name: Grace-Marie Vega, Class of 2019
Undergrad: Arizona State University
Hometown: Placentia, California
Fun Fact: One time, I drove a fire truck.

image1.JPGIf you were there on April 12, 2017, you hardly need me to recount the evening to you, but if you were not, here’s what you missed at this year’s Denver National Advocacy Dinner. First, allow me to set the scene. Room 210 of Claver hall, around dusk. As you walk into the room, you are immediately impressed by the free pizza AND La Croix. You look around and realize you are in the company of well-dressed professionals, esteemed professors, and the most promising physical therapy students in all of North America. You are here partially to avoid yet another night of diligent and thorough studying, but in a truer, more important sense, to get a handle on professional advocacy and how you as a student can become involved.

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The evening opened with an introduction from Dr. Ira Gorman. “Politics: you can’t ignore it, because it won’t ignore you!” And of course, he is right. Advocacy is inherently and perhaps lamentably inextricable from policy. Dr. Gorman went on to explain that in physical therapy, advocacy happens on different levels: at the level of the patient, the professional, the professional organization, and the healthcare environment as a whole. All of these levels are effected by legislation, and legislation can be effected by you. Dr. Gorman outlined political advocacy in a sequence of steps to follow.

First, you must arm yourself with knowledge. This can mean simply being aware of your professional organization, local government officials, and media you can utilize or connect with. The next step is research. This involves investigation of the issue you’re interested in, typically in the form of reading into the specifics and history of proposed legislation, and knowing a little about allies and opponents of that legislation. Then comes implementation. This means taking political action, possibly in the form of writing letters to or visiting elected officials, getting patient testimony, or connecting with legislative staff. The last step is reflection. Ultimately, healthcare reform will not happen by itself. It is up to you to be part of the creation of a system that best serves you and your patients. Your vote and your participation in democracy absolutely matters.

After Dr. Gorman’s talk, Dr. Hope Yasbin, Federal Affairs Liaison for the Colorado chapter of the APTA, talked to us about her own experiences in advocacy. Dr. Yasmin gave us the run down on a few of the biggest issues currently effecting our profession, including:

  • Repeal of the Medicare Therapy Cap: an arbitrary dollar amount limiting outpatient physical therapy and speech therapy coverage.
  • The PT Workforce Bill: which would incentivize PTs to build careers in underserved areas by offering loan forgiveness.
  • The SAFE PLAY Act: which sets up school districts with concussion education for young athletes.
  • The #ChoosePT campaign: an initiative to combat the prescription opioid epidemic.

If you would like more information on any of these topics, you might consider checking out the APTA action center webpage, and downloading the APTA Action app.

Following Dr. Yasmin was Regis’ own Ryan Tollis, a second year student and government affairs committee member. Ryan was chosen to attend this year’s Federal Advocacy Forum, a 2-day adventure/visit to Washington DC during which students, physical therapists, and lobbyists represent our profession and meet with elected officials. By Ryan’s account, it was a whirlwind of networking, briefing, and nonstop political action. Attending events like this is an awesome way to get involved, but there are other ways too.  You can:

To wrap up what was, by all accounts, a thoroughly informative and enjoyable evening, Dr. Cameron MacDonald reminded us that advocacy that best serves the public is when professionals in every field are practicing at the top of their scope. It is our right and duty to be bold in the development of our profession, and to take ownership of the skills we work hard to learn in order to offer the best service we can to our patients. In summation, physical therapy has grown to be what it is today due to the efforts of our professional organization, and the advocacy of many therapists before us. The future of our profession will depend on the work we do to advance it.

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By the end of the evening, you are very satisfied with the food (obviously), but even more so with yourself, for leaving as a more informed person than you were when you arrived. You tell yourself you will definitely be coming back next year, and you will be bringing all your friends.

Thanks to everyone who attended!

Special thanks to:

Speakers: Dr. Ira Gorman, Dr. Cameron MacDonald, and Dr. Hope Yasbin

Coordinators: Carol Passarelli and Ryan Tollis

Team: Kiki Anderton, Brianna Henggeler, Rachel Maass, Katie Ragle, Grace-Marie Vega

Funding: Dave Law and the Graduate Student Council, Dr. Mark Reinking and the Regis School of Physical Therapy

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Denver National Advocacy Dinner: April 12th

Mark your calendars!  Whether you just got into PT/PTA school or have been practicing for 20 years, we invite you to come to Regis University for a free dinner and discussion about current legislation that is pertinent to our profession.

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Become an advocate and learn how get more involved with the APTA. RSVP on the Facebook event.

WHEN: Wednesday, April 12th from 6:30pm-8:30pm

WHERE: 210 Claver Hall at Regis University

WHY: Be part of the future of the PT profession!

Want more details? Read all about last year’s event here.

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Mmmm…did someone say FREE PIZZA? Zuma, our service puppy in training, is excited for the Denver National Advocacy Dinner! Yum.

 

How to Be an Active Student APTA Member

Hello, APTA stars! In my previous post, I talked about my experience at 2016 National Student Conclave, and I promised to share some tips on how to get involved in the APTA. Here are a few ways (some easier than others) to kickstart your APTA involvement. I have personally used all of these methods, and I don’t regret any of them!

Action Plan for APTA involvement:

  1. Join (or resurface) Twitter. I know it may seem like Twitter is old hat, but trust me; everyone who’s anyone in the PT world is on Twitter. At the recommendation of a colleague, I resurfaced my dormant Twitter account this past summer after a couple years of inactivity, and I am so glad I did. I now connect with other students and professionals from around the nation, and I follow PT organizations that give me good information. Don’t know how to start? Create an account and follow me @KatieRagle. I’ll tweet you a shout-out, and you’ll have followers in no time.

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    Follow @APTAtweets for direct information on involvement!

  2. Attend APTA conferences. And when I say attend, I mean actually engage with the sessions and attendees. You won’t get anything out of conferences where you float in to meet a school requirement, half-heartedly listen to a couple speakers, and ditch early because you’re tired. Actively listen to the sessions. Resist the temptation to only talk to people from your class who go with you. Put yourself out there, and introduce yourself to people. PT is an amazingly friendly profession, and the people who sacrifice the time and money to attend conferences are generally the ones who want to network and meet others.
  3. Read your APTA emails! I know it can be overwhelming, but you can adjust the number of emails you receive if you log into your APTA account. One of the most important emails you can read is the Pulse—the Student Assembly newsletter/blog with all kinds of great information just for us students.

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    Student happens can be followed at @APTASA

  4. Check out the #XchangeSA. This is a monthly chat that the Student Assembly Director of Communications holds with a professional in the PT field. These chats have covered everything from student debt management to mentorship to the value of APTA membership. Take a look at the archived podcasts and plan to watch the next one!

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    Our new Director of Communications is Cruz Romero, SPT CSCS.  Follow him at @cruzromero602

  5. Find someone who is actively involved in the APTA and pick his or her brain about how to get started. Don’t be ashamed to ask! I got my start by sending a simple email, and the next thing I knew, I was sitting in a state APTA meeting with the influential leaders in our field. One of the speakers at NSC told us that nearly every person who is actively involved in the APTA had someone who inspired them to do so. Please find that person. If you need it to be me, then let me know, and I’ll get you amped about the APTA. Both professionals and other students want to help you get involved, but you have to ask!

I know this is a lot of information, but hopefully, this gives you a few concrete things that you can do right now to get more plugged in. It may not seem like much, but you’d be surprised how more connected you’ll be by following these steps.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at raglekatie@gmail.com or on Twitter @KatieRagle.

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Blogger: Katie Ragle, Class of 2018

The Best Loss I’ve Ever Had

Blogger Katie Ragle, Class of 2018, writes about her experience at the National Student Conclave held in Miami, Florida over the October 27-29th weekend.  

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Let me tell you about my trip to Miami.

It all started with an email from a fellow Regis student that read, “Hey Katie! I just tagged you in a Twitter post about the Student Assembly Board of Directors. Take a look at the application :). Deadline 7/1.” This began my journey into a passion for the APTA. But first, a history lesson:

If you are a PT or PTA student and an APTA member, then you are in the Student Assembly. There are around 29,000 of us, and we’re all led by a board of 10 people—the Student Assembly Board of Directors (SABoD). This board is comprised of positions such as president, vice president, and other director positions that help to make the student APTA experience a great one.

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That aforementioned email referred to the Director of Communications position on the SABoD. This person creates content to engage the Student Assembly through emails, social media, and videos. You may not realize it, but you receive emails from the Director of Communications on a regular basis.

As a broadcasting major with a minor in editing and publishing, this position was right up my alley. After I was encouraged to apply, I decided that I wanted this position to get more involved in the APTA and to use my talents to further the profession of physical therapy by engaging students from across the county.

After an application and a Skype interview, I was chosen to run alongside three other candidates for the Director of Communications. The election occurs every year at the National Student Conclave (NSC), which is the annual national APTA meeting that is just for students. Two weeks ago, I packed my suitcase and headed to Miami for the final election.

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The Regis representation at NSC.  I’m so glad they were there!

I arrived in Miami with nearly 1,000 PT and PTA students from around the country who gathered to learn how to be better practitioners and how to advocate for our profession. I was immediately blown away by the amount of enthusiasm and support for our field. Everyone eagerly engaged in meaningful conversations about their program and what they’re doing for the field of PT. Rather than simply clustering together with individuals from their schools, people branched out and met students from around the country. The excitement was palpable!

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These are the incredible candidates I got to interact with all weekend.

Little did I know that I would receive a ribbon that read “Candidate” all weekend so that people could ask me about my slated position. I had the opportunity to meet so many amazing people in my field! These people inspired me to not only be the best PT that I can be, but also to advocate for our profession and to represent it well. The speakers empowered us with knowledge in entertaining ways and generated passion for the field.

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This is one of my new friends, Alicia from MA

But more than passively attending, I got to actively participate in the conference. I participated in focus groups on how to make communication within the APTA better. I introduced a few speakers before their talks, and I met with the leaders of the Student Assembly to discuss the future of the organization. I also got to meet the president of the APTA, Dr. Sharon Dunn. She held an open Q&A for students to ask her any questions they had. She is both incredibly intelligent and personable. The APTA is fortunate to have her!

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APTA President, Dr. Sharon Dunn, gave all of us candidates a pep talk.

Did I win the election? No. Am I upset? Absolutely not. I wouldn’t trade my experience at NSC for anything. I made connections that will last a lifetime. This conference opened doors that I otherwise would have never been able to encounter. I still receive emails and messages from other students and professionals asking to keep in touch and encouraging future connection at upcoming APTA events. Best of all, NSC lit a fire within me for my future profession and for the organization that represents us so well.

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This is the amazing group of individuals with whom I ran for Director of Communications.  The one standing next to me (second from the left) was elected to the position.  His name is Cruz, and he will do great things for the Student Assembly!

In a future post, I will share some of the tips I learned at NSC about how to get plugged into the APTA;  for now, think about attending NSC 2017. It’s in Portland, Oregon, so how can you turn it down? You won’t regret it. We are the future of PT. Let’s be the best that we can be!

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Meet the Class of 2019 President: David Cummins

Name: David Cummins, Class of 2019
Hometown: Cortez, CO
Undergrad: Fort Lewis College

Fun Fact: I’ve moved 17 times since graduating high school

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When I received a letter from Regis University notifying me that I’d been accepted into their DPT program, I panicked. I had been working hard to get into PT school, but the reality of the impending changes caught me off guard. As a non-traditional student who had been out of school for more than 10 years, I was nervous about leaving the career I had worked so hard to build. The thought of surrounding myself with young, smart, successful, and ambitious classmates only added to my anxiety.

By the end of the first week of classes, I realized I had found my new family. Classmates surprised me by being genuinely interested in my academic success. They shared study guides, strategies for achievement, and—most importantly—support. There is now a palpable (Ha! Get it?) mentality that we’re all going to get through this program together;  that has made my anxiety melt away.

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David and his classmates climbing a 14er with some time off from school (PC: Elizabeth Johnson)

I was honored when someone nominated me for class president and elated when I was elected because the role will give me a chance to foster the supportive environment that got me through my first few weeks. The position comes with a lot of extra stress, but I’ll be working with an incredible group of elected officers who share the same vision of creating a healthy and supportive environment that is conducive to academic growth and overall success.

The 14 elected officers come from a wide variety of different backgrounds. Some have extensive experience working with physical therapists, some have worked in completely unrelated fields, and some are coming straight from undergraduate programs. Together, we represent a holistic cross-section of knowledge and viewpoints. We will utilize our combined skills and knowledge to build upon the foundation that previous classes have established and add our own projects and ideas to make this experience our own.

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The new officers for the Class of 2019

We’ve already been through a lot in the 11 short weeks we’ve known each other. The support and encouragement I’ve experienced has been overwhelming. Over the next 2.5 years, I hope to cultivate a supportive cohort based on the values we all share: we will be a community that promotes shared academic success and continues to motivate us to be the best, most compassionate physical therapists we can be.

President: David Cummins

Vice President: Katarina Mendoza

APTA Rep: Grace-Marie Vega

Fundraising Rep: Kassidy Stecklein and Celisa Hahn

DPT Rep: Nina Carson

Media Rep: Courtney Backward

Diversity Rep: Stephanie Adams

Ministry Rep: Sarah Collins

Service Rep: Amber Bolen

Move Forward Rep: Sarah Pancoast

Clin Ed Rep: Josh Hubert

Admissions Rep: Kelsie Jordan

Secretary: LeeAnne Little

Treasurer: Jennifer Tram

 

 

Student Involvement in the Colorado APTA

The faculty at Regis strongly encourages leadership from its students because it knows that those who care enough to be the change they want to see move our profession forward. Rest assured that over the course of your time at Regis there are many opportunities, both formal and informal, to either try leadership for the first time or to grow your current skillset. One of those ways is to become involved in the Student Special Interest Group for the Colorado Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association, (CO APTA sSIG for short).

I am the current 2016-2017 Chair of the CO APTA sSIG and a third year student in the Regis DPT program, and I would like to say something to those of you considering if the Regis DPT program is right for you, to the first years are who are about to embark on their first semester, and to the second years about to experience their first clinical rotation: you can do more than you think you can.

Running for a position on the CO APTA sSIG is an amazing way to broaden your perspective on what students of Physical Therapy, both Student Physical Therapists and Student Physical Therapist Assistants, are all about. The current board has 10 positions (http://coloradophysicaltherapists.org/student-sig/), and this year we are focusing on the following areas:

  • Creating a framework-for-action for the 2017-2018 sSIG
  • Growing student involvement with the APTA across the state through education and outreach
  • Building networking opportunities amongst students as well as between students and current professionals
  • Advocating for student issues at the state and federal level
  • Fundraising

With growing communication between APTA sSIGs across the nation, this is an exciting time to be involved. Aligning the sSIG with the CO APTA Chapter’s strategic plan provides a built in way to move forward, but there is plenty of room to grow new projects.

In the spring of 2017, we will be holding elections for the 2017-2018 CO APTA sSIG board. If you are interested in pushing yourself a little further, I encourage you to run for office, to use this as an opportunity to broaden your perspective beyond the next exam, and to begin shaping the future as a leader.

 

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Blogger: Adam Engelsgjerd

 

 

What is it like to be in the military and PT school?

Name: Zach Taillie, Class of 2018

Hometown: Phoenix, NY

Undergrad: SUNY Cortland

Fun Fact: I’ve been in the Air Force for 6 years.
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You may not believe this, but NASCAR Technical Institute is a bit of a dead-end school.  You read that right—there is a school completely dedicated to folks who want to learn about race car maintenance and occasionally take them for a spin.  It is a one-year program outside Charlotte, NC, and was what I thought I wanted to do.  While the program set me up for an awesome career as a tire technician at Sears Auto while living out of my parents’ basement, I decided I wanted more out . I found myself over at the Air National Guard office, and in December of 2009, I enlisted.

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Once I was done with my training and learned that I could get school payed for while serving in the military, I was stoked to get started. Little did I know that when it comes to school and military duty, school usually doesn’t win. The biggest mission we undertake in the Air National Guard is state-level disaster response.  My first emergency response was to a winter storm, and to my surprise, I was told by my supervisor that school takes a backseat to duty.  I remember feeling frustrated at the situation, but once I showed up I realized how much of a positive impact we could have.  The feeling of helping out and giving back to those who needed it far outweighed any disappointment at missing classes or balancing class all day with working at night.  Luckily, I was blessed with great professors who would email me notes and allow me to reschedule tests if necessary.  This understanding and flexibility allowed me to respond whenever the call went out, and it allowed me to still excel in school.

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The military hasn’t been all rough, though.  During one of my winter breaks, I was sent to Germany for training.  I spent Christmas in Kaiserslauten, New Years in Berlin, and my birthday in Amsterdam.  Even when I wasn’t out exploring Europe, I was able to have fun at work coordinating air drops (think Humvees and supplies hopping out of planes) with the 86th Airlift Wing.  I’ve had the opportunity to deploy to the Middle East and serve with coalition troops from all over the world and make some lifelong friends.  Oh, and having part of school paid for is another perk!

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Although I originally thought I wanted to make a career of the military as an officer once I graduated from college, I stumbled upon physical therapy during my junior year and fell in love.  Due to a shoulder injury, I was able to experience what it was like to go from injured back to working out and wanted to give that gift to others.  Fast-forward a couple of years, and here I am: at Regis fulfilling me dream!  Currently, I serve with the 153rd Airlift Wing up in Cheyenne, Wyoming.  I go up once a month and spend at least half of my breaks working.  Luckily, my drill schedule and our finals week seem to always coincide…so I get the opportunity to test how long I can stay awake and study.  Two semesters down, and I’m still here!!  While I listen to my classmates plan super rad trips for our summer break, I’m looking forward to two weeks of work connected by a drill weekend.  All things considered, though, I would do all the same given another chance.  I work with some great people and get to do things for my job that most people only see in movies: riding on C-130s, running through live shoot houses, firing some pretty awesome weapons, and watching live gun runs from planes overhead.  The military/civilian balance can be a challenge at times, but it’s one that’s well worth it!

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If you have any questions about balancing school with the military, please feel free to contact me at ztaillie@regis.edu.