Leadership Through Service: A Student Perspective

Name: Amber Bolen, Class of 2019 Service Representative

Undergrad: University of Oregon

Hometown: Eugene, OR

Fun Fact: In college I spontaneously gained the ability to wiggle my ears.

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Hi everyone! My name is Amber and I am the Regis DPT Class of 2019’s Service Representative. Being the service rep for my class means that I work with people and organizations in the community to plan and implement service projects for my class to participate in. I have also had the wonderful opportunity to be Regis’s PT Day of Service Representative for 2017, a title that has now been passed to Austin Adamson, the service rep for Regis’ class of 2020.

The prospect of serving others was one of the main draws for me to attend Regis University’s DPT program. One of the first questions I would ask my prospective schools was “what opportunities do you provide for students to be involved in serving the community?” Regis was by far the most equipped to answer this question. With service learning projects being embedded into almost every semester, domestic and international service opportunities through the Global Health Pathway, and countless opportunities and contacts for students to find more to be involved in, I was hooked.

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Regis DPT Class of 2019 students pose with Denver Parks and Rec employees after working hard mulching trees and raking leaves at Sloan’s Lake Park.

Before beginning my journey as my class’s service rep, I wanted to determine what my fellow classmates were really interested in. Being people who all made the conscious decision to live in Colorado for 2.5 years, outdoor projects were high on the list. In the past, I’ve organized day projects cleaning and keeping up parks surrounding Regis. For example, for PT Day of Service we worked at Berkeley Park to restore the playgrounds, repaint picnic tables, clear trash, and unearth perennial plants.

Another trip involved collaborating with Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado to provide trail restoration work at the Anna Mule Trails near Georgetown, Colorado. The trail restoration project was a weekend endeavor that resulted in sore muscles, a more refined grasp on what goes into creating a trail, great food, and excellent classmate bonding time.

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Regis Class of 2019 students take a break for a photo op while they work on the Anna Mule Trail near Georgetown, CO.

Being the service rep for my class has truly been an honor and I would be remised not to reflect on what I’ve learned in the process. Here are some “pearls of wisdom” I was able to collect:

  • You don’t have to be outgoing to be a student representative, but in my case I did have to be comfortable reaching out to community partners I hadn’t met yet.
  • Sometimes what you think an individual or a community needs is not actually what they need. Our job when providing service is to listen and respond in kindness if we are to do anything tangible.
  • While direct service (working with people face-to-face) is valuable and rewarding, indirect service, such as maintaining community areas, has merits too. I can’t count how many people thanked us during our park clean ups!
  • An act of service does not have to be a huge, momentous task. Small acts of service are appreciated more than we think.
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Regis Class of 2019 and 2020 students and friends take a group photo in Berkeley Park on PT Day of Service.

The fact that so many Regis DPT students are willing and excited to take part in service projects beyond what is expected by their classes speaks volumes about the type of people that our program attracts. I have never met a group a people, students and faculty alike, that are so committed to doing more for others. Service is so inextricably linked to the curriculum, values, and culture here at Regis that it has become part of who we are. As my classes at Regis come to a close and I am getting precariously close to “real world PT,” I know that the emphasis placed on these values will make us excellent physical therapists. We have learned to be sensitive to the needs of our patients and our communities and understand that physical therapists have a unique position to advocate for and implement change on individual, community, and societal levels. My hope as we all eventually graduate is for us to take everything that we’ve learned and apply it to our own clinical practice. I hope for all of us to listen, ask questions, create connections, and take initiative to make a meaningful impact in the lives of others.

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Cleaning up trash at Berkeley Park!

Please stay tuned for PT Day of Service this year, happening in early October of this year! Look for announcements from Austin Adamson, the Regis DPT Class of 2020 Service Rep and PT Day of Service rep for 2018! If you have questions about anything involving student service at Regis, please feel free to email me at abolen@regis.edu. In addition, if you have any questions about PT Day of Service 2018, Austin’s email is aadamson001@regis.edu.

 

So You’re Interviewing for PT School (and more specifically for REGIS!)…

Name: Erin Lemberger

Undergrad: University of Northern Colorado

Hometown: Littleton, CO

Fun Fact: I sing the national anthem at sporting events!

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It’s almost that time…interviews! I can’t wait to meet this year’s prospective students, and I know everyone else in our Regis DPT community is excited as well.

Those in the midst of or about to interview, I know this is a stressful and exciting time. Just a year ago, I remember the butterflies I was feeling, along with anxiety and anticipation. To start, take a deep breath, trust yourself, and know that this is the fun part. This is the time to find the program that is the right fit for you. You’ve worked hard preparing for this, so remember to take the time to enjoy it too. The more relaxed you are, the more you will be the best version of yourself on interview day.

Kelsie, the Class of 2019 admissions representative, received some questions about the interview process from prospective students last year. Carol, the Class of 2018 admissions representative, and her have shared some answers to these questions that you may be wondering about as well. I hope this helps assuage any concerns you may have!

Q: Should I bring anything to the interview (pen, portfolio, resume, notepad, etc.)?

A: No need to bring anything. You will receive a folder and pen, information about Regis, and a water bottle. Of course, you’re welcome to bring your own paper and pen, but there’s no need. Some people like having a notepad to jot down questions for the faculty or interesting things they learned throughout the day, but it is completely your own preference. Also, keep in mind, you will be carrying whatever you bring around campus during the campus tour.

Q: Are there any questions that stumped you or caught you off guard? What types of interview questions should I expect?

A: Interviews are now done in a group format, so not only will you have the opportunity to answer questions, you’ll be hearing and responding to what others have said. It really feels like the interviewers are sparking a conversation with each question. They want this discussion to be natural and give you the opportunity to be yourself. I really mean it when I say to be yourself as much as you can be. Regis is unique in the fact that they really look for people’s character during the interview, rather than solely admitting students for grades and GRE scores. When the faculty asks you questions, they are not seeking a right or wrong answer. They are seeking to learn who YOU are and how you communicate. With the group interview format, there is opportunity to listen and engage with the faculty as well as the other prospective students, so take advantage of these moments.

Q: How can I prepare for the interview?

A: Some advice is to look at the Regis website and see where the values of Regis fit into your life and how you can express that during interviews. Faculty biographies are good information to look at prior to interviews, and reviewing this information can give you an idea of questions you might want to ask faculty members. If you do feel stumped at any point, don’t be afraid to take a minute to gather your thoughts because they appreciate that more than a made-up answer. It also helped me to look up some common physical therapy school/traditional interview questions and brainstorm answers. Think about what you have experienced already and have those stories ready. If you have some solid examples of your experiences, you’ll be able to adapt to wherever the conversation goes. Finally, make sure you research the topics you’ve been given ahead of time so you can prepare and get your thoughts together. Another piece of advice is to perform a practice interview with friends or family members in a group setting. Practice speaking out loud and ensuring you are speaking clearly and loud enough as they ask you different interview questions.

Q: Is there a chance to meet current students?

A: YES! You will have multiple opportunities to interact with various students throughout your day. Also, from 4:30-6:30pm on both interview days, we will have a meet-and-greet off campus for prospective students to meet with current students. I hope to see you all there! That being said, this is by no means mandatory and your attendance will not affect your admission to the program.

Q: What should I expect from the group interview format?

A: The group interview will consist of two faculty members and three candidates. It is not designed to be all three of you taking turns answering one question at a time nor each of you competing to have the best answer; instead, it is designed to be more of a fluid, facilitated discussion of specific topics among everyone.

Q: What will the whole day be like?

A: Everyone will go through 5 different “stations,” so to speak. They include the interview, campus tour, student Q&A panel, a skills lab observation in one of our classes, and an anatomy lab presentation. They won’t necessarily be in that order, but the whole interview day will include all stations and conclude with lunch. You’ll also stick with the same student-led tour group between each part of your day, so you’ll have plenty of time to get to know them and ask them questions as they come to mind.

Q: What should I wear?

A: I would err on the side of business formal. Most men typically wear matching pants and jacket, a button-up collared shirt, and a tie. Most women wear slacks or a dress skirt, a blazer, and a blouse. Cropped dress pants would work too, and if dresses are your thing, then go for it. It is really important that you feel comfortable in whatever you end up wearing! That being said, when it comes to shoes, heels are great, but as long as you’re really comfortable in them. Flats are perfectly fine; in fact, if you opt to wear heels, I would bring a pair of flats along with you so you can change into them while you go on your campus tour. Also, be sure to bring a jacket in case it’s cold. There will be a coat rack available to store your belongings while you are inside. Simply remember this is a professional interview, so dressing professionally is highly recommended.

Best of luck, interviewees! Feel free to reach out if you have any more questions. I can be reached via e-mail at elemberger@regis.edu. We are all looking forward to meeting you!

– Erin, Kelsie, and Carol

7 Reasons You Should Take a Gap Year Before PT School

Name: Courtney Hardin, Class of 2018
Undergrad: Washington State University (GO COUGS)
Hometown: Spokane, WA
Fun Fact: I’m obsessed with my dog.

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If you’re currently reading this blog asking yourself, “Is it a good time to go to school right now? Should I take a year off before I apply? Should I even take 2?” Well, this blog is for you! I took a year off before going to PT school, and it was the best decision I could have made for my soul and–of course–for my professional career.

Here are 7 reasons why taking a year off could be the right choice for you:

1. Make Sure PT is the Right Career Choice

I didn’t have enough experience with multiple disciplines of PT, so I volunteered at an inpatient rehab facility for a few months and got a job as an outpatient PT aide. I ended up getting a lot of experience and gained a passion for PT that I didn’t have in my undergraduate pursuits.

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Halloween at the clinic

2. Polish Your Application

I needed to bump up my GPA a little before applying. So, I ended up retaking a couple of the core classes at a local college (anatomy and physiology… #amiright). Whether you need more hours in the clinic or that pre-req grade, taking a year off will help you be the best applicant possible!

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Taking some time to reflect in Peru during my year off

3. Explore

I’d always wanted to travel abroad in undergrad, so I decided to backpack through South America. I went to Peru and hiked the Inca trail to Machu Picchu, then to a ski mountain in Chile, I toured the Wineries of rural Mendoza, cruised through Argentina by bicycle, explored the city of Buenos Aires, and hiked through Iguazu Falls. This trip changed my life and my viewpoint in so many indescribable ways. So, before you enter graduate school and a full-time PT gig, take the time to explore the world now!

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Machu Picchu!

4. Be There for Family and Friends

I wanted to spend some time with my family before heading off to grad school because hey—my family is pretty rad! If you’re considering PT school, sometimes taking a year to visit home, reconnect with friends, and get some quality family time in is key before you sign up for 3 grueling years of work.

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5. Give Your Brain a Break

I needed a break from the school books. I wanted to enjoy a good book (of my choosing), take time to run a few races, and live a bit more “stress-free” before embarking on the next school adventure. Regardless of if you take a year off or not, you will eventually get burned out in PT school from all the studying with no breaks. Many of my classmates agree that taking a year (or more!) before PT school helped delay that burnout onset.

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6. Do Some Things for YOU, not for your Application

I needed some relaxation time up at the lake cabin. If you take a year off, don’t spend every second on your PT application: have FUN!

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7. Grow as a Person

At the end of the day, I simply needed to just be me for a year.  Taking a year off doesn’t mean you’re putting your life on hold; it means that you get a whole year to find out more about yourself and fine tune what you want in life.

Without taking that time off, I wouldn’t have done all the necessary things to improve my application, my confidence, my PT experience, and—of course—my life experience. There is no specific time you have to apply! Schools don’t look at how much time you take off between undergrad and applications; they look at the person you are when you apply. And hey, if you’re ready to apply now, go for it—I know plenty of people who did that, too.  Bottom line: do what’s best for you, not what’s best for everyone else!

If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at chardin@regis.edu.

What is the Regis DPT Interview Like?

Name: Monika Teter, Class of 2019
Hometown: Los Alamos, NM
Undergrad: Colorado State University
Fun Fact: I had a 5th wisdom tooth that had to be removed in 5th grade!

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            We all remember sitting down for hours at a time: filling out PT school applications, finally hitting the daunting submit button, and then that overwhelming joy we felt when we got our first interview invitation. I can’t believe my interview experience was already a year ago! The entire application process is a rollercoaster of emotions, but my experience with Regis’ interview put my nerves at ease and stood out from the rest of the schools I applied to. From the moment I stepped onto campus that snowy Monday afternoon, I felt a sense of belonging that I hadn’t felt at any other school. The interview process exposed unique facets of Regis’ program including the sense of community, the school’s dedication to the PT field, supportive faculty and students, unique involvement opportunities, and the program’s adaptability to unpredictable situations.

            My interview at Regis was one of the most memorable of my interviews—not only because of the people I met and conversations I had, but because of the blizzard that ensued that day. Though Regis provided the option to do a phone interview if we thought it was too dangerous to travel, I decided to attend the interview anyway since I was in Colorado at the time. I braved the drive from Fort Collins to Denver in my suit and red plaid snow boots armed with four-wheel drive and going over potential interview questions in my head. I was unbelievably nervous! The storm inevitably resulted in the early closure of campus and a shortened interview day. This could have caused mass chaos, but I was impressed by the adaptability of the Regis PT community to expedite the interview process without jeopardizing our time and experience. The organizers made sure every applicant had a fair chance regardless of the barrier Mother Nature concocted. They were able to calmly adapt to an unpredictable situation, which is a valuable skill in this field. Additionally, the current Regis PT students offered up their homes for interviewees to stay until they were able to safely get home. This kindness expressed by current students and the flexibility of the program spoke volumes to me, and I knew this was a program I wanted to be a part of.

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Enjoying the CO sunshine on days off!

            Weather aside, the interview process was a wonderful representation of the program. I was able to get a sense that this was a PT family and everyone was here to support each other. The students spoke nothing but good things regarding the faculty, and I understood why when I met several of them. Each and every one of the faculty radiated dedication to the field as they talked about their passions and areas of research during the faculty-interviewee mixer. We talked about the Peru trip Heidi was preparing to take students to as part of their global immersions trip. We chatted with Marcia and learned about her breadth of research in leadership, clinical development, and management of neurological disorders. I talked with Larisa in my interview regarding my love for volunteering and how the service learning here at Regis would fill that particular passion in my life. Talking to the faculty here at Regis was surprisingly easy in the stressful environment interviews can create. They were attentive and were interested in getting to know me as a person deeper than just my academic accomplishments.

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My mentor, grand-mentor and me at the welcome BBQ

          Regis also wanted to give us a peak at what our daily lives would look like as a PT student by taking us into the anatomy lab and having us sit in on a class. I remember walking into the anatomy lab where students talked about their experiences with cadavers as they pointed out structures on the brains. We also had the opportunity to participate in a postural assessment and wheelchair transfer lab in PT Exam. I remember looking at the students in awe thinking that I would hopefully one day be doing the exact same lab. These two unique experiences set Regis apart, and I was sold!

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Some of us first years enjoying our day off

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9thHealth Fair for Service Learning

         I went home that day bubbling with excitement. I had found my ideal program that matched my values, and I was hopeful they saw something in me that would complement their program. The day I got my acceptance letter, I was elated to call Regis my home. I have become part of a class full of brilliant minds and kind souls. These incredible people push me to be better, to stay that extra hour after class, to help maintain my sanity by going on a hike, and keep me motivated during hectic weeks. I have made some incredible friendships and have had some amazing experiences so far.

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Friendsgiving with the PT Fam!

         There are several wonderful programs out there, but something resonated with me the day I left the interview at Regis. It is truly an amazing community composed of unique perspectives nestled in the most supportive environment. I am happy to call Regis my home and my PT family.

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The Professional Ceremony inducts us into the Regis DPT program at the beginning of the semester.

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Our anatomy lab group–celebrating the end of the semester at the Nutcracker!

On the interview weekend: Meet Michael Young

Michael Young

Hometown: Madison, WI

Undergrad: University of Wisconsin, Madison

Fun fact: I visited 16 states in 30 days during an epic summer road trip.

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During the summer of 2014, I found myself in Denver, five hours early for a flight. It was a picturesque day: 82 degrees in the afternoon sun and even more comfortable in the shade. I saw a sign for Regis University and recognized the name as one with a PT program, so I took the nearest exit and walked around campus for the afternoon.  After wandering around the classrooms and watching part of a lacrosse practice, I felt like this was a place I could see myself spending the next three years.

Six months and many applications later, I was back at Regis—this time for an interview. I woke up early on the day and did some yoga in the room of my Airbnb. That’s not my normal routine, but I wanted to do everything in my power to calm my nerves. That morning, yoga took me to my happy place. I put on my suit, threw on my coat and started my three-block walk to campus.

This time on campus, it was cold. After living in Texas for five years, January in Denver made me remember my roots in Madison.  I had made the dangerous 6AM decision to skip my morning coffee; would I lapse into caffeine withdrawal and spend the day with a pounding headache? Or, maybe, would my pumping adrenaline take the place of that necessary stimulant? I worried about it for the next seven hours. It’s funny what really makes you nervous on interview day.

Looking back, I now realize that the interview was the easiest part of the day for me. As soon as I sat down with my interviewer, I knew that Regis was different from the other schools. My interview was a conversation about my past experiences and current hobbies in lieu of the usual discussion of GPA, prerequisite record and knowledge of the PT field. They didn’t ask why a political science major was interested in PT school; they told me how important it was to have people with diverse backgrounds integrated into the profession. They made me feel like my personality and individualism mattered.

The next 24 hours was an emotional roller coaster of second-guessing interview responses, dreaming of an aggressive interviewer who compared me to a chiropractor (gasp!) and an overwhelming feeling of relief and gratitude for the amazing day I had at Regis. As I sat at the Denver airport waiting for my 6AM outbound flight, I started daydreaming about coming back as an actual student. Regis was the school for me and I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else. When I got the acceptance email, I knew my life would never be the same. Now, six months into school, I haven’t been proven wrong.

Best of luck with your interviews, candidates! I hope you feel as at home as I did.