Leadership Through Service: A Student Perspective

Name: Amber Bolen, Class of 2019 Service Representative

Undergrad: University of Oregon

Hometown: Eugene, OR

Fun Fact: In college I spontaneously gained the ability to wiggle my ears.

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Hi everyone! My name is Amber and I am the Regis DPT Class of 2019’s Service Representative. Being the service rep for my class means that I work with people and organizations in the community to plan and implement service projects for my class to participate in. I have also had the wonderful opportunity to be Regis’s PT Day of Service Representative for 2017, a title that has now been passed to Austin Adamson, the service rep for Regis’ class of 2020.

The prospect of serving others was one of the main draws for me to attend Regis University’s DPT program. One of the first questions I would ask my prospective schools was “what opportunities do you provide for students to be involved in serving the community?” Regis was by far the most equipped to answer this question. With service learning projects being embedded into almost every semester, domestic and international service opportunities through the Global Health Pathway, and countless opportunities and contacts for students to find more to be involved in, I was hooked.

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Regis DPT Class of 2019 students pose with Denver Parks and Rec employees after working hard mulching trees and raking leaves at Sloan’s Lake Park.

Before beginning my journey as my class’s service rep, I wanted to determine what my fellow classmates were really interested in. Being people who all made the conscious decision to live in Colorado for 2.5 years, outdoor projects were high on the list. In the past, I’ve organized day projects cleaning and keeping up parks surrounding Regis. For example, for PT Day of Service we worked at Berkeley Park to restore the playgrounds, repaint picnic tables, clear trash, and unearth perennial plants.

Another trip involved collaborating with Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado to provide trail restoration work at the Anna Mule Trails near Georgetown, Colorado. The trail restoration project was a weekend endeavor that resulted in sore muscles, a more refined grasp on what goes into creating a trail, great food, and excellent classmate bonding time.

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Regis Class of 2019 students take a break for a photo op while they work on the Anna Mule Trail near Georgetown, CO.

Being the service rep for my class has truly been an honor and I would be remised not to reflect on what I’ve learned in the process. Here are some “pearls of wisdom” I was able to collect:

  • You don’t have to be outgoing to be a student representative, but in my case I did have to be comfortable reaching out to community partners I hadn’t met yet.
  • Sometimes what you think an individual or a community needs is not actually what they need. Our job when providing service is to listen and respond in kindness if we are to do anything tangible.
  • While direct service (working with people face-to-face) is valuable and rewarding, indirect service, such as maintaining community areas, has merits too. I can’t count how many people thanked us during our park clean ups!
  • An act of service does not have to be a huge, momentous task. Small acts of service are appreciated more than we think.
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Regis Class of 2019 and 2020 students and friends take a group photo in Berkeley Park on PT Day of Service.

The fact that so many Regis DPT students are willing and excited to take part in service projects beyond what is expected by their classes speaks volumes about the type of people that our program attracts. I have never met a group a people, students and faculty alike, that are so committed to doing more for others. Service is so inextricably linked to the curriculum, values, and culture here at Regis that it has become part of who we are. As my classes at Regis come to a close and I am getting precariously close to “real world PT,” I know that the emphasis placed on these values will make us excellent physical therapists. We have learned to be sensitive to the needs of our patients and our communities and understand that physical therapists have a unique position to advocate for and implement change on individual, community, and societal levels. My hope as we all eventually graduate is for us to take everything that we’ve learned and apply it to our own clinical practice. I hope for all of us to listen, ask questions, create connections, and take initiative to make a meaningful impact in the lives of others.

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Cleaning up trash at Berkeley Park!

Please stay tuned for PT Day of Service this year, happening in early October of this year! Look for announcements from Austin Adamson, the Regis DPT Class of 2020 Service Rep and PT Day of Service rep for 2018! If you have questions about anything involving student service at Regis, please feel free to email me at abolen@regis.edu. In addition, if you have any questions about PT Day of Service 2018, Austin’s email is aadamson001@regis.edu.

 

Regis DPT Students Present: “LGBT+ 101”

 

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Taylor Tso, Hannah Clark, Felix Hill (left to right)

Regis University first-year DPT students Felix Hill, Hannah Clark, and Taylor Tso recently held a session for their classmates entitled “LGBT+ 101 for Student Physical Therapists.” The presentation covered foundational terminology and concepts related to LGBTQIA+ communities, a brief overview of LGBT+ healthcare disparities, as well as tips for making clinical spaces more inclusive. Here are some thoughts from the presenters related to key foundational concepts, what motivated them to present on this topic, and what their plans are to expand on this work in the future:

What does LGBTQIA+ stand for?

LGBTQIA+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual.

 

What is the difference between gender and sex?

Both sex and gender exist on spectrums. A person’s sex is assigned to them at birth based on their genitalia, typically as either male or female. Intersex people are born with a unique combination of sex traits such as hormones, internal sex organs, and chromosomes. Gender involves a complex relationship between our bodies (think biology and societally determined physical masculine and/or feminine attributes), identities (think inherent internal experience), and expressions (think fashion and mannerisms). While gender is commonly thought of as a binary system (men and women, boys and girls), there are people whose identities do not fall within either of these categories exclusively, or even at all. While many people identify with the gender often attributed to the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), there are others who do not share this experience (transgender).

 

Does gender identity have anything to do with sexual orientation?

No! You cannot make assumptions concerning someone’s sexual orientation based on the way they express their gender or based on their gender identity. Sexual orientation simply has to do with whom someone is sexually attracted to or not. It also has nothing to do with how sexually active someone is!

 

Why did you feel it was important to present on this topics?

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 “In spite of our community’s unique healthcare needs and the stark disparities that affect LGBT+ people’s access to healthcare, typical DPT programs offer little to no education that would prepare you to treat LGBT+ patients. We wanted our cohort to be competent and confident in treating this population.” –Felix

“Felix recognized this need at Regis early on and has been working closely with our faculty to develop more inclusive and comprehensive educational materials. As an ally, I have been honored to work with Felix and other members of PT Proud (the first APTA recognized LGBT+ advocacy group) in this process of educating ourselves and others. I believe that the field of physical therapy can do a better job of caring for LGBT+ patients and I want to be a part of the solution.” –Hannah

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What do you believe was the main impact of this presentation?

 “Facilitating educational exposure to LGBT+ topics that people may or may not have had knowledge of before. This presentation sparks curiosity and lays down a baseline understanding for healthcare professionals to better their communication, and thus, quality of care for their LGBT+ patients.” –Taylor

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So you have given this presentation—now what?

 This was just the beginning! Due to negative past experiences and fear of discrimination, many LGBT+ people will go to extremes to delay care. Even if someone has access to health insurance and can afford to come see a PT, which many do not, people are likely to wait until their condition is very serious, which then contributes to poorer outcomes.

We will work to share our knowledge widely throughout the U.S., starting with a presentation at CU in August. But ultimately, workshops are not enough! As board members of PT Proud, the LGBT+ catalyst group in the HPA section of the APTA, we want to ensure that physical therapy professionals across the country receive a basic level of LGBT+ competency training, which will ultimately require changes to DPT and PTA curricula. We will also be working with PT Proud’s Equity task force to influence laws and policies to increase LGBT+ healthcare access.

Felix, Hannah, and Taylor all look forward to the prospect of future presentations.

 

How can I learn more?

Follow PT Proud on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

Feel free to leave a comment on this post with any questions or thoughts as well!

Get ready for the 2018 Move Forward 5K/10K Race!

Name: Sarah Pancoast, Class of 2019

Undergrad: Regis University

Hometown: Evergreen, Colorado

Fun Fact: I own a 20-year-old, 9-foot Columbian Red Tail Boa Constrictor

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When race day arrives, you know that you have put in the necessary training for the day to be successful. Whether that is enjoying time with friends or other participants, being outside in the sun, shaving off some time or just getting exercise within the community. Any of those reasons create excitement as you cross the finish line! I will be honest and say that running is really not my forte… I only really “run” when it is required for a CrossFit workout. However, I have participated in the last four Move Forward races and have come to actually enjoy a 5K, in which I decrease my time each year. Someday I hope to tackle a 10K, so I can check it off my bucket list.

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Running with my pup, Star, in the 2017 Move Forward Race

 

The next Move Forward 5k/10k Race at Regis University, will be on September 22, 2018.

This race is hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and has been an annual event for 16 years! As Race Director, this is an important event for the DPT program, as we share our knowledge in how to live healthy lives, involve the community, and fundraise money for two extremely important foundations: Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine Companions is especially meaningful to Regis, as we have annual teams of students who assist in puppy raising before they are sent to train to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy helps support research in physical therapy for our future profession.

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Our goal this year is to fundraise $5,000. If you or you know of someone who would want to sponsor this race, we and our foundations would be extremely grateful! All money raised goes to the foundations listed above. Any amount goes a long way! You can access the donation page here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/donate

If you would like to sponsor this race, please email: moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com for more information.

 

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Zuma as a new pup! – she is training to be a service dog and is being raised by us, the School of Physical Therapy

 

This year we will be running a new course which follows the Clear Creek Trail system just down from campus. This means the 10K will be an out and back, not be a double of what the 5K has been in the past, so it’ll be something new and exciting! Anyone can run a 5K with practice, motivation and community involvement. If you need help, sign up for our Couch to 5K program to get you prepared for this fun event. Our goal is to get the community involved in exercise, learning to care for themselves, and most of all, to have fun!

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When we’re not training for Move Forward, we enjoy springtime on the Quad!

 

This event was created to get people to make healthy choices and get moving, so we can live an optimal life! Early morning bagels, fruit and coffee will be provided to get that extra boost before the race starts. On the count of 3, 2, 1…GO!! Walk, run, skip, hop or handstand walk your way to the finish line to enjoy burgers, hot dogs and beer. You deserve it after the hard work you have put in. Stick around after the race for music, yoga, water stations, vendors, and Canine Companions for Independence dogs to keep the day going. Don’t forget we will have a fun run for kids too, starting at 10:30 am.

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If you have not signed up for the race yet and you know you do not want to miss it, you can register here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/registration-1

 

The Move Forward Race will be held on September 22, 2018 and starts at 9:00am. If you have any further questions, please contact me at spancoast001@regis.edu.

Hope to see you out there!

 

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My first Thanksgiving 5K

Sarah Pancoast graduated with a B.S. in Health and Exercise Science from Regis University in 2015 and was once a competitive gymnast and has taught gymnastics from preschool to a USAG competitive level for 17 years. She currently owns her own massage therapy practice in Boulder, Colorado, Back to Balance Therapy. After finding she needed a new perspective on how the body functions, she enrolled in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Regis University and hopes to incorporate physical therapy with her massage therapy in the future. In her free time, Sarah likes to CrossFit, Olympic Weightlift, do jigsaw puzzles and hike with her dog, Star.

 

Mental Health Wellness in DPT School

Name: Abbey Ferguson

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With all of its incredible opportunities, graduate school, especially a doctorate program, also brings a new amount of stress and anxiety. It is a pressure cooker for bringing out both the best and the worst in us, and as my first year came to a close, I found myself drowning in mental illness and anxiety. I realized I wasn’t alone as we embraced vulnerability in our summer Psychosocial Aspects of Health Care class, and many of us found the courage to admit how exhausted we were with life, finding relief in common ground.

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We are literally on a common ground 🙂

Our Psych-Soc. class was one of the many resources I began to take advantage of in order to regain mental wellness. Regis’ counseling center provided free counseling, all of the advisors had their doors open, and with time many of my classmates became close friends as we continually showed support for each other. However, there was still a nagging sense that I couldn’t pursue full wellness in our program without bringing some sort of awareness to mental health issues that permeated our program.

 

When I was 19, I was diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa. After years of treatment, bouncing in and out of recovery, I arrived at Regis ill-prepared to ward off another relapse. Being in a healthcare field is difficult as an individual trying to fight health and diet culture which often triggers eating disorder behavior. I found myself getting angry with some of the comments people would say or the culture that was fostered in the general population, and I felt helpless.

 

However, thanks to the community at Regis and within our DPT program, I was encouraged to do something about my feelings of anger and helplessness. I began to formulate an education program to advocate for those in recovery from eating disorders, and to educate the program on how to foster a less triggering environment. We had one of Regis’s counselors come and speak about the language health-care providers use and how these words can affect an individual’s perception about themselves. We also had a panel of three second-year DPT students who shared their own experiences recovering from an eating disorder in graduate school.

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I was overwhelmed by the support. As I looked out at the crowd that had showed up to my small education session, I grew misty-eyed and almost cried in front of everyone. My frustration dissipated, and  I was instead filled with pride for the program I am a part of. Fellow students asked questions, attempted to understand, and showed overwhelming empathy as the session continued. After the session, dozens of fellow DPT students came up to me, expressing similar experiences of recovery and wanting to continue the conversation. Weeks later, another DPT student came up to me at our national conference in New Orleans, excited and passionate about the topic and wanting to team up with me to advocate for mental health as well. I found it encouraging and exciting to see like-minded, future health care professionals so interested in becoming more familiar with these issues in order to properly care for individuals plagued by these illnesses.

 

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There is no question: graduate school is hard. It is intense, exhausting, and often times it feels like I am just crawling along. But, I have never been more thankful to be a part of a program that allows its students to own their mental health by advocating and educating the community.