Meet the Class of 2019 President: David Cummins

Name: David Cummins, Class of 2019
Hometown: Cortez, CO
Undergrad: Fort Lewis College

Fun Fact: I’ve moved 17 times since graduating high school

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When I received a letter from Regis University notifying me that I’d been accepted into their DPT program, I panicked. I had been working hard to get into PT school, but the reality of the impending changes caught me off guard. As a non-traditional student who had been out of school for more than 10 years, I was nervous about leaving the career I had worked so hard to build. The thought of surrounding myself with young, smart, successful, and ambitious classmates only added to my anxiety.

By the end of the first week of classes, I realized I had found my new family. Classmates surprised me by being genuinely interested in my academic success. They shared study guides, strategies for achievement, and—most importantly—support. There is now a palpable (Ha! Get it?) mentality that we’re all going to get through this program together;  that has made my anxiety melt away.

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David and his classmates climbing a 14er with some time off from school (PC: Elizabeth Johnson)

I was honored when someone nominated me for class president and elated when I was elected because the role will give me a chance to foster the supportive environment that got me through my first few weeks. The position comes with a lot of extra stress, but I’ll be working with an incredible group of elected officers who share the same vision of creating a healthy and supportive environment that is conducive to academic growth and overall success.

The 14 elected officers come from a wide variety of different backgrounds. Some have extensive experience working with physical therapists, some have worked in completely unrelated fields, and some are coming straight from undergraduate programs. Together, we represent a holistic cross-section of knowledge and viewpoints. We will utilize our combined skills and knowledge to build upon the foundation that previous classes have established and add our own projects and ideas to make this experience our own.

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The new officers for the Class of 2019

We’ve already been through a lot in the 11 short weeks we’ve known each other. The support and encouragement I’ve experienced has been overwhelming. Over the next 2.5 years, I hope to cultivate a supportive cohort based on the values we all share: we will be a community that promotes shared academic success and continues to motivate us to be the best, most compassionate physical therapists we can be.

President: David Cummins

Vice President: Katarina Mendoza

APTA Rep: Grace-Marie Vega

Fundraising Rep: Kassidy Stecklein and Celisa Hahn

DPT Rep: Nina Carson

Media Rep: Courtney Backward

Diversity Rep: Stephanie Adams

Ministry Rep: Sarah Collins

Service Rep: Amber Bolen

Move Forward Rep: Sarah Pancoast

Clin Ed Rep: Josh Hubert

Admissions Rep: Kelsie Jordan

Secretary: LeeAnne Little

Treasurer: Jennifer Tram

 

 

Pelvic Health Physical Therapy: First Clinical Experience Reflection

Name: Maggie Nguyen, Class of 2018
Hometown: San Jose, CA
Undergrad: UC Santa Barbara

Fun Fact: I got 33 stitches across my forehead in high school.

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What is pelvic physical therapy?

I never would have guessed that my first clinical rotation would land me in rural Montrose, Colorado with a Clinical Instructor who specializes in pelvic health. I walked in on the first day absolutely terrified and with no idea what pelvic PT entailed. It turns out that pelvic physical therapy encompasses a wide range of diagnoses ranging from pre/post-surgery (hysterectomy, prostatectomy, C-section, etc.), pregnancy, sexual trauma, interstitial cystitis, urinary and fecal incontinence, rectal/uterine prolapse, and—essentially—anyone who is experiencing pelvic pain. We treat both women and men; we practiced manual therapy externally and internally using our hands and various tools.

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The pelvic floor

Your pelvic floor has two main purposes: it is a network of muscles that stabilize your entire pelvis and hips—so it affects your back and down to your knees—and it also relaxes and contracts at the appropriate times; this allows you to jump, run, and laugh without urinating or having a bowel movement when you don’t want to. If your pelvis is out of alignment or the muscles of the pelvic floor are not firing correctly, it throws off your entire body and is extremely painful. Just like you can get knots in the muscles of your neck and back, you can also get knots within your pelvic floor.

It was a world of PT that I didn’t even know existed. My CI was a Regis graduate and her treatment revolves mainly around manual therapy—specifically, trigger point release and soft tissue massage. She also uses biofeedback: by putting electrodes around the rectum, patients are given a visual of how strong or weak their pelvic floor muscle contractions are. The first four weeks of my rotation were spent mostly observing my CI. Every once in a while, she’d let me palpate external muscles that felt abnormal. By the fifth week, I had a foundation strong enough to be able to assess and treat some patients entirely on my own!

Did I feel prepared?

Yes and no. Who remembers the origin, insertion or innervation of the bulbocavernosus? I sure didn’t; a lot of our pelvic floor knowledge came from the first semester of PT school, and it took a little bit of time to refresh on the details. On the other hand, I had a tool belt filled with knowledge that I could draw from: I used the lower quarter scan we learned in our PT Exam class, manual muscle testing, motivational interviewing and, most importantly, palpation. Palpation allowed me to do an external assessment of posture and pelvic alignment despite not having a thorough background of pelvic health.

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Biggest Takeaway?

My first clinical rotation gave me my “breakthrough moment.” We all start school questioning whether or not we deserve to be here, whether or not we’re as smart as our peers, and whether or not we’re going to be good practitioners. For the past year, I wasn’t sure of any of those things until my fourth week of this first clinical. I had an overwhelming feeling of gratitude from my patients and a feeling of capability that reignited my passion for PT and reminded me of why I started the whole journey in the first place.

And, if you ever find yourself exploring the Western Slope, make sure to check out Telluride, Ouray, Black Canyon National Park, and the breathtaking Blue Lakes!

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Regis DPT gear sale: order before October 30th!

It’s that time of the year: the fall clothing order is here! The Class of 2018 will take orders until October 30th, so now is the time to get your Regis DPT swag.

http://regisdpt.wixsite.com/clothingorder/shop

We have water bottles, wine glasses, hats, shirts and sweaters that will all be emblazoned with the Regis DPT logo upon ordering.  Whether you’re preparing for the winter season or looking for gift ideas, we recommend you check out the list and order before October 30th!

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Move Forward 5K/10K Recap

Move Forward 2016 (September 17, 2016) was a huge success! We had 261 runners signed up for the event and raised over $7,000 for Canine for Companions and The Foundation for Physical Therapy. A sincere thank you to all of our volunteers, runners, and sponsors for making this event amazing.  If you have any questions, suggestions, or would like to be involved in next year’s race please email us at moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com.

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Our beautiful sign made by Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson!

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Fastest Faculty Awards go to Andy and Amy.

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Our service dog Takia, making sure we don’t forget who we are raising money for…

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A few racers/volunteers enjoying some yoga after the race.

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Post-Run Fun!

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Our Couch to 5K team did amazing this year! Next year, maybe a 5K to 10K team?

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No one asked Matt (Class of 2017) to dress up, but that is just how great this man is…

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Class of 2017’s Move Forward Team; great job, everyone! The Class of 2018 has some big shoes to fill…

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We can’t wait for the start of next year’s race!

 

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Ryan Bourdo, co-director of Move Forward, graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo.

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Upcoming Event: ADVENTURE FEST!

If you love mini golf, go karts, food and craft beer, you do not want to miss the awesome event coming up this Saturday, October 8th! The Regis DPT class of 2018 is hosting Adventure Fest to raise money for our Regis graduation celebration.  It’s also an opportunity to celebrate fall, have fun with family and friends, and get to know the Class of 2019.

When: Saturday, October 8, 2016 from 10am-2pm!

Why: All proceeds from this event will go towards our end of the year bash!

Price: You can purchase one ticket for $18 or 2 tickets for $30.

Children (ages 4-15): $8; those under the age of 4 are FREE!

Tickets: sold Monday-Friday the week of Oct. 3-7th from 12-1pm in the Claver Café as well as in front of the Main Café!

You can buy your tickets with cash, check, or remotely by VENMO (@RegisDPT2018).

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This is an event for all ages and there is something to do for everyone. Each ticket includes free food, $2 craft beers, and a park bracelet that provides you unlimited access to mini golf, go karting, and rope courses! Furthermore, Regis DPT mentors and mentees can enter into a mini-golf competition together and the team with the best score wins a prize. Come out and have a great time while supporting the Regis DPT class of 2018!

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Blogger: Emily Symon, Class of 2018

 

 

6 Weeks into PT School: Meet Kelsie Jordan

Name: Kelsie Jordan, Class of 2019
Hometown: Portland, OR
Undergrad: Oregon State University
Fun Fact: I spent the summer of 2014 studying in Salamanca, Spain.

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If I had to describe the first few weeks of PT school in one word, it would probably be “overwhelming.” I don’t even mean that in a negative way— so many of the experiences I’ve had so far have been amazing—but I would definitely not say it’s been easy. My classmates and I have been overwhelmed with both the excitement and nervousness to finally start this next part of our lives: in the past month, we’ve been introduced to a new school, new people, new homes, new habits, and—of course—with the amount of information we’ve received since the first day of classes.  More than anything else, though, I’ve been overwhelmed by all the new opportunities at my disposal and all the great people I get to spend the next three years with.

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Free concerts and NFL kick off!

You’d think that having a class of 81 people would make getting to know everyone difficult, but it’s been quite the opposite at Regis. It turns out that when you spend roughly 40+ hours per week with the same people who are in the exact same boat, you get to know a lot about each other in a very short amount of time. Of course, I obviously don’t know absolutely everyone well at this point, but it’s still easy to forget that we all met less than two months ago. Before deciding on Regis, I was a little apprehensive about having such a large class compared to other DPT programs; now that I’m here, I wouldn’t want it any other way.

The biggest piece of advice I’ve heard time and time again from the second and third year students is to take time for myself and have fun outside of school. I’ve definitely taken that advice to heart!   Perhaps that means I should be spending more of my free time studying, but hey, at least I’m having fun, right? I’ve managed to leave plenty of time for hiking, camping, sporting events, concerts, Netflix, and IM sports—and I’ve been having a blast! Being a successful student is all about maintaining balance between work and play, so those mental health breaks are important to me for keeping my brain from being overloaded.

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Hiking Horsetooth Mountain in Fort Collins

So exploring Colorado has been the easy part of transitioning to Regis—I mean, what’s not to love? Starting school again, on the other hand…I only took one year off between graduation and PT school, but it still took some transition time to remember how to take notes and study. Fortunately for me, a lot of the material so far has been familiar information from undergrad, though it’s definitely more intense. One of the aspects of the Regis DPT program that I really appreciate is the collaborative atmosphere.  Anyone—students and faculty alike—with a little more expertise in a certain area has been doing their best to share that information by providing extra resources, study sessions, etc. It also helps that we’ve all been embraced right into the Regis DPT community by the second and third years, and I definitely get the sense that the faculty genuinely care about our success in school and in our future careers.

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We’re official! Our new PT supplies after the Professional Ceremony

We’re now six weeks into PT school and sometimes I still have these moments where I can’t believe I’m actually here. It’s crazy to think back to this time last year when I still hadn’t even submitted my first PTCAS application, and now here I am: a student physical therapist. Overall, it feels like I’ve adjusted well to my new home in Denver as well as the grad student life—despite the overwhelming moments. Now that we’re through our first round of exams, it’s probably a safe bet that our “honeymoon phase” has come to a close and we have an increasingly busy schedule looming ahead. I’m still developing responsible study habits and I have a lot to learn about how to be a successful student, but I look forward to the upcoming opportunities for service, leadership, and classmate bonding that the rest of the semester will bring!

Counting down to more blog posts…

The school year has ramped up!  Our Class of 2019 just finished their first set of exams, the Class of 2018 is finishing their last week of clinicals, and the Class of 2017 is preparing for their third clinical rotation next week.

Along with that, the blog committee has new members and we’re excited to begin posting for the 2016-2017 school year!

Check out our website tomorrow to hear from Kelsie Jordan, our first Class of 2019 featured blogger.

Reflections on the First Year of PT School

Name: Rachel Maass, Class of 2018
Hometown: Fort Collins, Colorado
Undergrad: Colorado State University
Fun Fact: I get the hiccups a lot.
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This first year of physical therapy school has been one of the longest, craziest, and hardest years of my life for sure. Looking back on the year, I am so proud of my classmates and myself for what we have accomplished! A year ago, I was leaving the city I love and the last real job I’d have before becoming a PT. I moved in with three other girls from the program and was unsure of what to expect at Regis. With the start of school, I remember long days in Claver Hall room 315 and our professional ceremony where we said our oath. I remember making those first cuts in Anatomy lab and being the only girl in a group of boys, besides our cadaver who we named Pam.

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Getting our PT kits at the professional ceremony

I must say that physical therapy school was not quite as I had imagined it would be, but I have grown and learned so much in this first year, and I would not change that for anything. It definitely took some time to get out of the competitive mindset I had in undergrad, but I quickly found that the competitive atmosphere does not exist at Regis. Our class of 2018 has become a family. This year was challenging, but I have learned so much from my experiences and classmates. I feel like I am turning into a young professional, and I have started to figure out what I want to do as a PT. Through CSM (the APTA national conference) presentations as well as meetings I went to outside of what is expected, I have found an interest in helping young athletes and special populations, including women with female athlete triad disorder and individuals with eating disorders.

It can be really difficult to explain this process of PT school to people outside of the program, but I truly cherish the changes and challenges between the first and last days of the first year. I can definitely say that it is all worth it! As I get ready to head out to my first clinical experience, I feel confident in the skills I have learned and in my ability to present myself in a professional, competent way. Even as I count down the days, I look forward to finishing the next two years at Regis and working to become the best PT I can be with my support system and classmates by my side.

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Anatomy study session—PT school reality

I have many pieces of advice, so do not be afraid to ask me or your mentors as some of you go into this first year! Some of my biggest pieces of advice are these:

  • Know why you are here and why you want to be a physical therapist. Write it down. In this first year, you may question why you are putting yourself through all of it, and it can be a good reminder when things get tough.
  • Be flexible. Have an open mind. Classes and expectations change, so be ready for it.
  • Try to always keep the big picture in mind (how you study and how you behave, for example). Focus on what really matters. Take advantage of the learning opportunities provided (ISL, review sessions, etc.). Keep up on the basics.

Try everything. Get involved in leadership roles. Go to meetings. Join a committee for the Move Forward Race. Go to diversity lunches, etc. Make your time here count, and have fun!

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A Guide to Passing the Comp Exam

The comprehensive exam is a two-part test that encompasses all class material through the first two years of PT school. It is the last major hurdle in the quest to obtain the beloved PT diploma. It’s very similar to fighting the giant hand at the end of single player Super Smash Bros. If you have a solid game plan, you’ll be fine. If you don’t, prepare to get smacked into oblivion. Fortunately, we are given a lovely break in between summer and fall that lasts about a month, which is more than enough time to prepare. But you do need to attack that time wisely. I’ve run through ways people have planned out this break for our class and have come up with a few recommended strategies for managing all that time.

The most important aspect for the majority of individuals is a consistent schedule throughout the week. Total hours massed for studying seems to vary a bit, but a safe estimate of time is 5-6 hours per day, 5 days per week. The total time is dependent on how efficiently you feel you study. If you study well, do less, not so well, take a couple extra hours where you need them.

What you study is the important part of the “study” aspect of your schedule. Not every course is weighted the same. The staff has been kind by giving us the breakdown of content for each half of the test. I’m not going to go into detail, but basically Musculoskeletal Management, Neurological Management, and Management Applications of Physiology are your most important classes (by a lot). Divide the total study into where you need the most help, and base importance partly on these percentages (in other words don’t spend an entire day on PT exam). Inside of those hours, try to avoid studying one class per day unless you really can devote the concentration. I suggest 2-3 different courses on an average study day. One caveat from a professor, if you miss a day on your schedule, DO NOT GO BACK. Move on with your schedule. You will most likely not miss any questions from that day if you are diligent with the rest of your time.

So you have the study hours scheduled. Now comes the break schedule. As you learned in Movement Science class, you need breaks, and you need exercise. Most of you won’t have as hard of a time with this as I have recently (running makes me cry more than sweat). Try to take a break when you complete 3-4 hours of studying (and honestly, make it exercise and food). Then go back for a few more hours of studying.

Now you need to decide where to study, which can be anywhere. I’ve studied at the park, home, school, coffee shops, and airplanes. It doesn’t matter where you are as long as you stick to the schedule. One suggestion I will make is try to avoid studying alone. Yes, some of you will disagree with me on this, but most will say that it’s nice to have someone around when you could use a better explanation than YouTube is providing for a concept you get snagged on (or if the video on YouTube is funny and you need affirmation that you have a sense of humor).

With all that said, you need to enjoy your break. Do things that you really want to do. Go to Uganda. Go to that music festival. See how many beer gardens you can attend. Take a day to try to sleep until 4:00 p.m. This is the part of the break where you keep a little bit of your sanity. Not to mention, you don’t have a lot of time after this period. You have made it this far just fine; don’t expect them to throw something at you that you can’t handle. It’s not worth destroying yourself studying without having any fun on the weekends.

Ultimately, most students find that it’s pretty relaxed studying (outside of the occasional panic attack). This is what we’ve worked so hard up until this point for, and we all know SO MUCH. Schedule well. Study efficiently. Play hard. This is just the next check mark to complete before we can call ourselves doctor on graduation day (and then go by our first names for the rest of our career).

Blogger: Tommy Hughes

Hometown: Bartlesville, OK

Undergrad: University of Arkansas

Fun Fact: I’m Seth Rogan’s cousin

Teaching Fitness Classes While in School

Name: Morgan Pearson, Class of 2017

Hometown: Gillette, WY

Undergrad: University of Wyoming

Fun Fact: I teach a fitness class called POUND…no, I’m not joking. Let me tell you more…

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What the heck is POUND?

You may have read a blog post a couple of months ago that highlighted my teaching a fitness class to some of my fellow classmates called “POUND.” It’s a super fun cardio/strengthening workout that I absolutely love teaching! If you want to find out more about the class, visit the website. But the real reason I’m writing is to explain how I balance PT school and working as a fitness instructor teaching POUND.

I became a certified POUND Pro in January of this year (as a second year PT student) because I felt that I had found my studying groove in PT school and could handle teaching a class a couple times a week. I mean I have to workout anyway, so why not make some money while doing it?

I wanted to practice teaching the choreography before I applied for a job to teach the class, so I reached out to my lovely classmates on our class Facebook page and asked if any of them would like to take a free class from me. My classmates are extremely supportive, and a couple of them kindly agreed to try out the class. They ended up liking the class so much that I have continued to teach free classes for them almost every week (yes that’s girls AND boys in my class!).

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I decided I had practiced enough and would try my luck at finding a very part time job. I figured I could devote 2-3 hours/week to teaching a class since, like I said earlier, I have to work out anyways! I found a job that I could teach 2 hours/week, plus my free hour class I teach at Regis for my classmates. Sure, it’s hard being in PT school without a job, let alone with a job, but 3 hours a week is COMPLETELY doable. I have a couple of super moms and dads in my class, and let me tell you, my silly 3 hour/week job commitment is nothing compared to the time they devote to being rock star parents!

Pound at Athleta

Now I am not in any way suggesting that PT students should have a part time job during school….what I am suggesting is to take a couple of hours per week to fulfill what you are passionate about! I’m just lucky that I make a little extra cash while doing so J. PT school is a time commitment, and you truly have to devote many hours to class, studying, and group work, but it’s all about balance. Finding time to do the things you love is absolutely necessary. Whether it’s POUNDing, golfing, skiing, hiking, running, binge watching Netflix or Bravo TV, taking time for yourself is crucial to succeed in PT school!

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If you have any further questions about balancing your time in PT school, feel free to contact me any time at mpearson@regis.edu.

 

Flat Stanley Goes to Clinical

Name: Nicole Darragh, Class of 2017

Hometown: Columbus, OH

Undergrad: Regis University

Fun Fact: I think kale is totally overrated.

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The Class of 2017 recently returned from their second clinical rotations with a plethora of new knowledge and stories to share.  Some students even had a visitor along the way: Flat Stanley.  Flat Stanley is a small paper figurine that keeps students connected outside of the classroom.  Students take a photo of Flat Stanley completing an activity, learning a new technique, or going to a cool new location, and share those photos with their classmates through social media.  This helped us learn a little bit about each rotation, and keep in touch with our classmates.

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Pictured: Sarah Campbell ’17 with Flat Stanley on her first day of clinical (PC: Sarah Campbell)

Flat Stanley traveled to a wide variety of locations across the country including California, Wyoming, Kentucky, and even Alaska!  Along the way, Flat Stanley learned new documentation systems, new techniques in the clinics, and went on a lot of hikes.  Really, what Flat Stanley is trying to tell you is that while you’re on your clinical rotation, don’t forget to take the time to explore your new surroundings!

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Flat Stanley reviews Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) while at clinic in Chico, CA (PC: Adam Engelsgjerd)

 

Clinical rotations work in a variety of ways.  The first is the lottery option; students choose ten clinical sites from a large list compiled by the clinical education faculty, and rank them in order from 1-10.  Once the lottery is generated, students are placed at a site.  The second is the first come, first serve option; students can choose a site before the lottery begins that they are particularly interested in, and request to be placed at that site before it is taken.  The third is the set-up option: students are allowed to contact a clinical site that is not affiliated with Regis and set up a clinical rotation with them if they are interested.  When rotations get closer, you’ll learn more specifics about how they work, requirements, etc.

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Flat Stanley’s meet up at Devil’s Tower outside of Gillette, WY (PC: Amanda Morrow)

 

Throughout the clinical process, it is important to know that you might not always end up in Denver, and you’ll have to try something new!  Wherever you do end up, make sure to enjoy your free time.  Clinical can sometimes be very overwhelming, and it is crucial to take time for yourself, whether that be exploring your new surroundings, trying a local restaurant, or binging on Netflix.  And if the thought of being gone for six, eight, or twelve weeks scares you a little, all of us will tell you that the time flies by so quickly.  There isn’t much time to be bored!

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Flat Stanley goes sandboarding in the Great Sand Dunes National Park in southern Colorado (PC: Lauren Hill)

 

If you have any further questions about clinical rotations–or other places Flat Stanley and/or students traveled–please feel free to contact me at darra608@regis.edu!  Also, I would recommend reading the post below called “Class of 2017 DPT Student Lindsay Mayors Reflects on Her Clinical Rotation.” (https://regisdpt.org/2016/05/27/class-of-2017-dpt-student-lindsay-mayors-reflects-on-her-clinical-rotation/)

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Flat Stanley helps out with some end-of-the-day documentation (PC: Amy Medlock)

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Flat Stanley enjoying a nice Moscow Mule after a long week at clinical (PC: Amy Medlock)

 

 

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Flat Stanley joins Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson to run the Bolder Boulder race (PC: Lauren Hill)

Cover PC: David Cummins, Class of 2019

 

How to Have Fun in PT School

Name: Connor Longacre, Class of 2018

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Hometown: Wyomissing, PA

Fun Fact: I am a huge of soccer, though I haven’t formally played since I was 11.

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“It’s fun to have fun but you have to know how.” (Dr. Seuss, DPT)

Many of you reading this may think of the classroom as a no-nonsense place of learning. Those who distract others with joking and laughter are often unwelcome in such environments.

Hear me out, though.

If, in my time as a Student Physical Therapist, I choose to spend every hour of class, every day, for three years, as a solemn study machine, then what do I expect my career after PT school to look like? I would probably know as much as the dictionary, with the interpersonal skills of … well, a dictionary. Don’t get me wrong. School is serious. Working with patients is serious. Physical therapists must know how to be professional and serious. However, having fun is also an essential part of being a PT. From becoming friendly with our patients to creating engaging ways to make exercises more enjoyable, there is an occupational requirement to be fun-loving, which is why fun belongs in the classroom.

So, how does Regis University put the “fun” back in the fundamentals? Long story short, it doesn’t. All the university can do is give us (the students) time, space, and some freedom. It is not the professor’s job to bring in a beach ball or play funny YouTube videos. Adding the element of fun to academia is the sole responsibility of the student. When done well, it can be seamless—and even educational.

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At the risk of sounding as arrogant as I probably am, I’ve included some tips on how even you can have fun in the classroom:

  1. Learn to love where you are. If you’re in PT school, then the prospect of learning about PT things should be pretty darn exciting. Stay excited. Stay motivated. Learn to dwell on the details like they are the difference between being a good PT and a great PT (because they are).
  2. Find time to unwind. Everyone’s brain candle burns at a different speed. Some people can sit in class for 8 hours attentively, but when they get home, they’re spent. Other students may need to get up and walk around every hour, maybe chit-chat a little between lectures, but will buckle down during independent study. Give your brain time to rest.
  3. Get moving. Hours on hours of lectures can put you into a comatose-like state. Get up and walk around when given the chance. Personally, I like to kick a soccer ball around at breaks.
  4. Finally, get to know those lovely people you call classmates. Play intramural sports, go out to a brewery, maybe even hit a weekend camping trip. Warning: spending time with people may lead to smiling, laughing, inside jokes, and friendships. Friends make class fun.

There you have it, folks, a helpful-ish guide on how to have fun in PT School.

*Shoot, I should have added “write blog post” to the list of ways to have fun.

 

 

Regis DPT Students Plan the Move Forward 5K/10K

Name: Ryan Bourdo, Class of 2018

Hometown: Corvallis, Oregon

Undergrad: University of Oregon

Fun Fact: I ran a 4K snow shoe race once.

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Race day is always the best. It is the culmination of months of training—immediately followed by the chance to take a well-deserved day, week, or month off from running. The atmosphere is always amazing, too. Everyone is still a little groggy from being up way too early for the weekend, but there is still a palpable excitement; the people next to you on the starting line are instant friends because you all share a common goal: finish the race. And that feeling you get after finishing? Incredible. No matter how tough a race is for me, I am always energetic and talkative afterwards. I have been fortunate enough to run some fun races in the last few years, and I want to bring some of that same excitement to Move Forward.

The Move Forward 5K/10K Race (September 17, 2016) is arguably THE most important event of the year for Regis University’s School of Physical Therapy. I argue this because I am the co-director of the race this year, and this is my blog post. Move Forward is a special event for me. It is a chance to help my school share what we know to be the best ways to live healthy lives. I firmly believe anyone can complete a 5K with practice, motivation, and a little help if needed. More than anything, what I want for people to get out of Move Forward this year is to have a good time and learn a little about taking care of themselves.

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Some of the Class of 2018 after the 2015 Move Forward Race

The idea behind this event is to get people to think about their health, get moving, and live better. For those already signed up, make sure to get to the race early to get your grab bags! We will have bagels, bananas, and coffee for those needing an extra boost in the morning. Several of our classmates will also lead group stretching as well. And then we are off! Music will be blaring, water stations will be flowing, people will be cheering. Whether you are running or walking, we will make sure you have a good time. Make sure to stay after the race, too, because we are planning a lot of post-race greatness. Not only will we have burgers, hot dogs, and beer (not the healthiest, we know, but you deserve it) but we are planning a lot of activities, as well. Informational booths will be there to help guide you in taking care of yourself through exercise, nutrition, and general wellness. We also hope to have some yoga and/or Zumba classes after the race. And, because we want this to be a family event, we are looking for fun activities for kids, tool. Check out our website for updates as our race schedule finalizes: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com.

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Not only will this race be a great way to learn about how to stay healthy, but all of the proceeds will go to Canine for Companions and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine for Companions is especially meaningful to us at Regis because we have an annual team of students that assists in raising a dog before it starts training to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy is also a great cause; it helps support research in physical therapy. If you have not signed up for the race yet and I have thoroughly convinced you of how awesome this event will be, you can register here: https://moveforward5k10k.racedirector.com/registration-1.

Again, the race will be held on September 17, 2016 and begins at 9:00am.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me directly at rbourdo@regis.edu.

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Many Ryans running

Ryan Bourdo graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo

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The Physical Therapy Outcomes Registry

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Blogger: Katie Baratta

My name is Katie Baratta and I just graduated from the Regis University School of Physical Therapy. I had the opportunity to spend two weeks at the APTA doing a student internship. I was able to talk to many different members of the APTA, attend the Federal Advocacy Forum, and learn more about what the APTA has been doing to move our profession forward. I’ve written a series of essays about my experiences here at the Association.

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Data… I love it! As a former engineer who analyzed a lot of data in my pre-PT life, I find it fascinating to see how lots of tiny bits of information, combined together, can provide us with a more comprehensive picture.

The PT Outcomes Registry is one of APTA’s current projects to create a centralized database for outcome data. The idea is to track a set of prioritized outcome measures (currently there are nine outcomes, but this may expand) across the country. Clinicians perform the outcome assessment with the patient at the initial evaluation and again at discharge to measure the patient’s progress and then input the information into the computerized system. The PT Outcomes Registry then compiles the data from all practitioners so that practitioners can see how they measure against a benchmark of other providers.

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Timeline

The program is still in its pilot phase with 216 enrolled users (currently all practicing PTs, no PTAs) at 25 organizations. The most recent development is to include residents and fellows to compare their outcomes both during their residency/fellowship and again afterward to see how their outcomes change with time and experience. Later this year, APTA will collect feedback via user survey of pilot users regarding usability, pros/cons, glitches, and so forth. The team at APTA will then incorporate this feedback into the PT Outcomes Registry system.

The Registry will officially launch at the beginning of 2017, at which time any clinical site will be able to join. Clinicians will pay to enroll in the program, which will give them access to the aggregated data to see how their practice stacks up against national benchmarks. The service will not be limited to APTA members. Karen Chesbrough, the outcomes registry director, states that by the end of 2017 the APTA would love to have 1000 users, with the long-term goal of involving as many clinicians/sites as possible to get as accurate a picture of current practice as possible.

Which types of data are included?

The current outcomes include global measures, such as AM-PAC™ (Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care™), PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System), and OPTIMAL (Outpatient Physical Therapy Improvement in Movement Assessment Log). There are also regional/body-specific outcome measures such as NDI and Oswestry. Other data includes clinician profiles, patient demographics, and pain ratings; practitioners have the ability to enter data at treatment visits along with at initial evaluations, reassessment, and discharge. The types of outcomes included are vetted through an independent group of clinicians and academics (including one Canadian!) called the Scientific Advisory Panel.

The Scientific Advisory Panel is working in conjunction with the SIGs (Special Interest Groups) to develop prioritized objective data that the clinician would also collect as part of the PT Outcomes Registry based on the patient’s diagnosis. These modules may be specific to cervical pain or to infant torticollis, for example, and would include relevant ROM or other objective data.

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How does PT Outcomes Registry collect the data?

During the pilot program, enrollees are entering the data manually. Enrolled clinicians—or their clinic’s administrative support personnel—will log in to the system and select different tabs and boxes to enter the data, much like they do for electronic documentation of patient records.

However, manual data collection is time-consuming, so the current push within the project’s development is to build software “bridges” with all of the various EMR (electronic medical records) systems. These bridges would allow a computer program to connect the PT Outcomes Registry with each EMR system to pull the relevant pieces of data into the database. Each type of information (eg KOOS at initial eval, patient age, etc) will have an associated tag in the registry database, and each EMR will tag the same variable in their database so that the computer program will be able to match the data from the patient records to the PT Outcomes Registry. One EMR has already signed on to the project, and APTA is working to get more to participate. This will streamline the process significantly and will likely increase participation as less time and energy will be required for individual clinicians to enter the data by hand.

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What does this mean for clinicians?

Being a part of the PT Outcomes Registry would allow clinicians to see how their practice stacks up against others throughout the country. If a particular clinic performed very favorably within the Registry, it would be able to advertise this fact to patients and to different entities that may want to contract with the clinic. Participation in the PT Outcomes Registry would also enable a clinic to pinpoint how to improve poor performance in a particular area that they may not have previously recognized without the aggregate data.

The PT Outcomes Registry will provide objective information to support the assertion that PT restores function. We can then use this information to demonstrate our value to different organizations, whether that is with a hospital, an insurance organization, or to the general public.

The outcomes registry director also sees this information as eventually being linked to reimbursement. Linking outcomes to reimbursement would continue the trend to move away from fee-for-service and toward a value-based payment structure. A value-based payment structure rewards effective clinical practice, rather than performing treatment units with the highest reimbursement rates. This would be a win-win for evidence-based practitioners, as well as for their patients.

Eventually, with enough data, there is potential for the information to be used for research as well; the Outcomes Registry represents the exciting future of our profession!

PT Outcomes Registry Site | More info from the APTA

 

A Non-Native’s Guide to Colorado’s Summer Playground

Name: Evan Piche, Class of 2018

Hometown: Northampton, MA

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Fun Fact: I once thought I met Danny DeVito in an airport men’s room.

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Congratulations! If you’re reading this, there is a fair chance that you are either (a) my mother, or (b) a member of the incoming Class of 2019. Welcome, and since both parties will be visiting Colorado this summer, I’d like to help get you acquainted with some of the best trails Colorado has to offer. Denver is not, strictly speaking, a mountain town in the same sense as Telluride, Steamboat Springs, and Crested Butte are. We’re kind of out on the plains, straddling two worlds—but that doesn’t mean you’ll be short on options for running, hiking, or biking. We Denverites are fortunate enough to enjoy a wealth of those opportunities for after-school outdoor recreation, and when you have a long weekend and are up for a few hours in the car, the options for adventure are limitless.

With that, I’d like to offer my favorite hiking/trail running and mountain biking destinations in the Denver-metro area and beyond. From backcountry escapes to a quick after-class workout, you’re sure to find something to do this summer. (And, while I was not specifically asked to include this, I would be remiss in my duties if I did not use this opportunity to act as your ambassador to the world of Denver’s breakfast burritos.)

Hiking/Trail Running

School day: when you only have an hour or two after class, these are the places to check out! (15- 20 minutes away)

  • Matthews/Winters – Red Rocks Loop
    • A rolling, rocky 5-7 mile loop with fantastic views of the foothills west of Denver and the world-famous and aptly named Red Rocks Amphitheater.Mathew_Winters

trailrunproject.com/…/matthewswinters-red-rocks-loop

  • Falcon
    • Hands down the best climb in the Denver area, this trail winds its way up four steep technical miles to the summit of Mount Falcon. From here, either retrace your steps to the parking lot nearly 2,000 feet below or continue on to explore a vast trail network.Mt_Falcon.jpg

trailrunproject.com/…/mount-falcon-east-loop

  • Green Mountain, Lakewood
    • A mostly gentle 5-8 mile single track loop featuring the Front Range’s best sunrise and sunset views.Green_Mtn

trailrunproject.com/…/green-mountain-trail

Weekend: about a 90-minute drive from Denver

  • Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park
    • A classic RMNP hike; after meandering around the base of Long’s Peak, the trail turns vertical and ends with a fun scramble to Sky Pond amid boulder fields and some of the Park’s most impressive glaciers.Sky_Pond_RMNP

trailrunproject.com/…ail/7002175/sky-pond

Long Weekend: 3-5 hours from Denver

  • West Maroon Pass, Aspen to Crested Butte
    • This is considered a rite of passage among Colorado hikers and trail runners. While the towns of Crested Butte and Aspen are separated by one hundred miles of highway, this challenging, backcountry trail connects them so that “only” 10 miles sit between them. Pack a bathing suit (or not) for a dip in Conundrum Hot Springs if you plan to do this trip properly.

cascadedesigns.com/…/hiking-west-maroon-pass-from-aspen-to-crested-butte

Mountain Biking

School day:

  • Lair O’ the Bear 
    • Swoopy, flowing lines, grinding climbs, open meadows, and a breathtaking view of Mount Evans—all less than 30 minutes from Denver. After riding, grab a burger or brew in one of Morrison’s quaint eateries.Lair_of_the_bear

mtbproject.com/trail/703097

  • White Ranch 
    • This is a gem of a park and located only a few miles north of Golden; it offers trails that rival anything in Boulder (after all, you can see the iconic Flatirons from the parking lot) with a fraction of the traffic.White_Ranch

mtbproject.com/trail/632917

  • Apex Mountain Park, Enchanted Forest Trail 
    • Apex is one of Denver’s most well-utilized mountain bike trail networks, and with good reason. The Enchanted Forest descent is not to be missed. Be sure to check the link provided for alternate direction riding restrictions on odd/even days before you go. Bonus: these trails are a blast to ride in the snow after the fat bikers, skiers, and snowshoers do all the dirty work of packing down the snow.Apex_EnchantedF_Forest

mtbproject.com/trail/616137

Weekend:

  • Blue Sky to Indian Summer
    • Regardless of whether you mountain bike or hike (or climb, or paddle, or just enjoy beer), a trip to Fort Collins is always enjoyable. Fort Fun is home to one of the Front Range’s finest fast, flowing mountain bike trails. While options abound for long climbs up to the summit of Horsetooth Mountain Park, the Blue Sky Trail sticks to the lowlands, traversing a spectacular cliff line with scenery reminiscent of your favorite Western movie. Also, New Belgium brewery is not to be missed.

mtbproject.com/…/blue-sky-to-indian-summer

Long Weekend:

  • 401 Trail, Crested Butte, CO
    • Come spring and early summer, the wildflowers on this ultra-classic trail grow to be chest-high. Imagine ripping down 14 miles of high country singletrack, with views of snowcapped mountains disappearing and reappearing as you dive into and out of fields of wildflowers so high and dense as to obscure your line of sight. Be sure to grab tacos at Teocalli Tamale once back in town.401_Trail_CB

mtbproject.com/trail/338027

  • Slickrock Trail, Moab Utah
    • Quite possibly the most famous mountain bike trail in the world—and for good reason. Slickrock offers an other-worldly experience: an ocean of red sandstone surrounds you, with views of the Colorado River far below in the canyon. In the distance, the snowcapped La Sal Mountains dwarf the landscape and offer a stunning contrast to the red, pink, and orange hues of the desert. For après ride fun, check out the Moab Brewery, located right in the center of town—it’s an oasis of alcohol and burgers in an otherwise remarkably dry state.Slickrock

mtbproject.com/trail/158941

Burritos

The breakfast burrito was invented in the kitchen of Tia Sophia’s in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1975. Since that historic day, it has been possible to eat a burrito for all 3 (or more) meals of the day, a feat now commonly referred to as a “hat trick.” Like most of Denver, the breakfast burrito is not native to Colorado, but found in our city a welcoming home. I am unsure of whether or not Colorado has an “official” state food, but I would nominate the breakfast burrito for that honor.

With the help of acclaimed writer and Denver resident Brendan Leonard, I have assembled the definitive guide to Denver’s Best Breakfast Burritos:

  • Grand Prize: El Taco de Mexico on Santa Fe
  • First Runner Up: Bocaza on 17th Ave.
  • Second Runner Up: Steve’s Snappin’ Dogs
  • Honorable Mention: Illegal Pete’s
  • People’s Choice: Campfire Burritos (food truck)

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    Evan is an avid biker, trail runner and climber.  We hope you enjoyed his pictures and guide to an adventurous CO summer!