Student Spotlight: Johnny Herrera discuses the APTA National Student Conclave

Name: Johnny Herrera, Class of 2021, Colorado APTA Core Ambassador in 2018-2019

Undergrad: Grand View University

Hometown: Santiago, Dominican Republic

Fun Fact: During my junior and senior years of high school I only had class on Saturdays

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A couple of weekends ago, I had the pleasure of attending the National Student Conclave (NSC) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. For those of you who don’t know me, during my first year of PT school I was involved with the APTA through a position as the Colorado APTA Core Ambassador (feel free to contact me about what this position is!). I chose to attend this conference because it is the only conference that the APTA offers specifically for students, and it is also the only conference that is mainly put together by students. I believe NSC was put together as a conference where students vote for the upcoming term of Student Assembly Board of Directors (SABoD), and the students from the previous term hand over their positions. I figured I’m only a PT student once, so I might as well see what the APTA offers during a conference made for students. Most people viewed me as being nuts for leaving town during Halloween weekend, but when I look back on my time at the conference, I can truly say it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Here are a few reasons why:

  • During my time as core ambassador, I worked under supervision of the SABoD. The SABoD is a board of current students from all over the country who serve every SPT/SPTA in the country and improve their interactions with the APTA. When I began this position as a first year student, it was daunting to think that I could have any sort of impact on other students. I had put the members of the SABoD on a pedestal for taking on such large roles within the APTA, and when I arrived at the NSC, I realized all of the members of the board during my term as Core Ambassador were there. Turns out, they’re a pretty cool group of humans. I had initially found myself intimidated because they were students who had these huge responsibilities and large platforms; but it turns out they were all just like any other student in PT school, just with a bit more responsibility. They are all broke college kids who study a ton, have doubts and fears about PT school and their futures, and love to have fun on the weekends with their friends. Being able to interact with them and get to know them personally was honestly refreshing. It was nice to see that those who had these high positions were no different than myself or any different than my current Regis classmates. They just had a passion for student involvement and they made sure to do something about it! I left having this renewed sense of ability to accomplish anything I really wanted to, and it was because of these amazing humans.
  • While reflecting about the NSC, I realized how similar it was to Regis DPT’s interview day. I know that for some, that day was super stressful, but for me, it was about getting to know people and further realizing why I wanted to join such an amazing profession. When I looked around at NSC, it was a huge melting pot of students from all around the country coming together to demonstrate their passion for PT and its future. It was so cool to hear about the amazing things that students all over the country are doing and how they’re making an impact within their communities.
  • People from all over the country recognize Regis, so when you tell them you go to school there, they WANT to talk to you. Selfishly, it was really cool to hear about how many students really wanted to go to Regis but didn’t get in (small pat on the back moment for getting in).
  • One of the talks was put together by Jimmy McKay, who is the CEO of the podcast “PT Pintcast”. For those of you who have never heard of it, definitely look into it and you might find some of our professors on previous episodes! The talk was a live podcast interview, where Jimmy interviewed Shante Cofield (AKA the Movement Maestro) and Josh D’Angelo (AKA founder of PT Day of Service) and then was interviewed by them. The point of the interviews was to share stories of how they used their passions to build what they now do for a living, and their stories ended by saying that all they had to do was ask. It sounds like such a simple thing, but when the worst thing that can be said to you after a question is “no”, then why not shoot for the stars? (I believe all 3 interviews are uploaded, so go listen to them for some motivation!) All weekend long, all 3 of these individuals were at some of the booths in the exhibit hall, so I got to meet them and have conversations with them. How often do you get to walk up to a stranger who you know has made a difference in the world of PT and just get to chat with them?!
  • Throughout the weekend, I was able to learn about a variety of travel companies, OP clinics, and residencies. I was even able to build rapport with specific clinic and residency directors, hopefully putting me in a good position in the future to pursue employment or a resident position within one of those companies if I choose to.
  • Lastly, the absurd amount of free stuff. Who doesn’t like soft t-shirts and pint glasses?!!
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The NSC Exhibit Hall

As exhausted (and possibly hungover) as I was during my drive back to Denver, there were so many good memories and great relationships built during that weekend. I hope I was able to give you some insight as to what these large conferences are all about. Last time I heard, NSC was going to be discontinued until the APTA found a better way of getting student involvement within the conference. That can change soon, so stay updated on NSC news, and if they decide to keep it rolling while you’re a student, I can promise you that the money and travel will be well worth it.

Feel free to reach out if you have any questions about anything or if you want to know more about APTA involvement! Can’t wait for everyone to experience this at CSM this year!

Move Forward 5k/10k Race 2019, Featuring a New Course!

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 Are you a runner, walker, or just love dogs (and/or beer)? The Regis University School of Physical Therapy is hosting its 17th iteration of the Move Forward 5k/10k and kids run at Regis University on September 21st, 2019. The race will take place on the Regis University Northwest Denver campus, and we are especially excited this year to unveil a new course that takes participants off campus and onto the beautiful Clear Creek trail headed west. The course for both the 5k and 10k is an out-and-back and starts and finishes in the quad on the Regis University campus. I am an avid runner but will get to experience a race from the other side of things this time as a race director. This race welcomes all ages, levels of fitness, and supports two amazing foundations: The Foundation for Physical Therapy and Canine Companions for Independence

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Our youngest companion in training, Garin

This race is especially important to the school of physical therapy because it is hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and has been an annual event for 17 years! This race means a lot to our program, and the physical therapy profession as we share our passion for promoting health, involving community, and raising money for Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine Companions is especially meaningful to Regis, as we have annual teams of students who assist in puppy raising before they are sent to train to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy helps support research in physical therapy for our future profession.

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Wether you are a running machine or are looking for a fun casual time we would love for you to join us. Early morning bagels, fruit, and coffee will be provided to give you that pickup before the race! Stick around after the race to enjoy burgers, hot dogs, and last but not least…beer! There will also be yoga, music, vendors, and Canine Companions for Independence dogs to keep you busy! Also remember to bring your kids! This is a family friendly event and the kids run will be a fun event around our beautiful quad area! 

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We are still looking for sponsors–this race is a non-profit and all proceeds go to the aforementioned foundations. If you or you know someone who would like to sponsor this race, the Regis University School of Physical Therapy and our foundations would be extremely grateful! No donation is too small, a little goes a long way! You can find more information or sign up for the race at https://runsignup.com/Race/CO/Denver/MoveForward5K10K . There is also a donation button listed on the website for donations. 

 

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this race, please email our sponsorship team at gdaub@regis.edu or jolden@regis.edu for more information. 

Please join us for this amazing event! Again, the race will be held at Regis University on Saturday, September 21, 2019 starting at 7:30am!

If you have any further questions, please contact me at mlombardo@regis.edu

Hope to see you there! 

~ Mark Lombardo, Class of 2020 Move Forward Representative

 

Regis DPT Global Health Pathway Immersion trip to Huancayo, Peru

This past spring, 8 students from the Regis DPT Global Health Pathway attended a 3-week global immersion trip to Huancayo, Peru, led by Regis DPT faculty member Dr. Heidi Eigsti and Regis DPT alumnus Dr. Amber Walker.

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“We were fortunate to have the expertise of Dr. Heidi Eigsti and Dr. Amber Walker. This was Dr. Eigsti’s third trip to Huancayo and it took about 5 seconds after our plane landed to realize how popular she is in Huancayo. It was quickly evident how much genuine compassion she invested into her relationships on previous trips. She developed trust, and what I realized is that when you care that deeply about others, they don’t forget. The foundation that Dr. Eigsti and past students built on previous trips allowed us to quickly build relationships with these individuals as well. As a result, we were able to hit the ground running with our purpose there in partnering with them.” -Dr. Jessica Kirkwood, Regis DPT Class of 2019

Family Nurse Practitioner and DPT students collaborated with the Catholic Medical Mission Board Community Based Rehabilitation program to provide inter-professional support and services to children who have disabilities and their families. Students had the opportunity to provide physical therapy services in a collaborative model of care at Carrion hospital outpatient physical therapy department.

“These experiences help both students and faculty more clearly define personal and professional values, acknowledge what we can learn from others, and ask us to expand our perception of how we can have a greater impact on the health outcomes of all members in our communities specifically those members who live on the margins.” -Dr. Heidi Eigsti.

 

Student Perspective on the value of the Global Pathway Immersion Trips

 “It was incredibly valuable to experience another culture in such an immersive way. We spent much of our time learning about the healthcare system in Peru while providing free health fairs and working at Carrion Hospital and CMMB, a non-profit organization that provides therapy for children with disabilities. I will never forget the people I met, the places I saw, the food I ate, and the lessons I learned during my 3 weeks in Huancayo.

I came into the trip with a very go-to attitude and I wanted to help as much as I possibly could. However, during this trip I realized that sometimes more important than doing is watching, listening, and going with the flow. This is something that I feel we’re taught in our global health pathway as a whole. However, the concept really hit home for me in Peru and I left with a humility that I had not expected to come away with. I realized that we weren’t there to “do it all”; we were there to learn and to do some good while we were at it. Sometimes our impact is big, like providing adaptive equipment to a child with cerebral palsy. Sometimes our impact is smaller, like putting a smile on someone else’s face for 0.5 seconds. I realized that sometimes the biggest impact is just showing up, learning, listening, and showing love.” -Dr. Amber Bolen, Class of 2019

 

“My experience in Huancayo, Peru was filled with endless learning. It did not take long for me to realize how often I take my resources for granted. As our trip coordinator Natalia reminded us, “You have amazing teachers, you have amazing resources, you have amazing opportunities. Take them.” This trip was a much needed reminder that I have been given endless privileges that others are not as fortunate to receive. It is my duty to consistently use these privileges to help others. Working with our community partners in Peru- Carrion Hospital, Continental University, and CMMB- taught me a lot about the differences in our healthcare system and how deeply limited resources acts as a restriction to outcomes. Navigating these relationships was also very impactful, as it taught me how to balance respect with education to work on both nurturing relationships while also promoting health in our profession. The change we made in those quick 3 weeks is really minimal in the big picture, but taking the lessons I learned and applying it to my future practice is what will make a difference. Witnessing the social injustices experienced in Huancayo firsthand has lit a fire inside of me- to open my eyes a little wider, listen a little clearer, and to act with more intention.”– Dr. Jessica Kirkwood, Class of 2019

 

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Why We Chose Regis: Reflections From Current DPT Students

I interviewed at Regis roughly one year ago, and as I look back on that day, I realize my decision to accept my spot in the DPT Class of 2021 was an easy one.

I decided I wanted to pursue physical therapy when I was 18 years old. I spent over 200 hours in observation, determining the kind of PT I aspired to be. It was during that reflection that I began to understand how important my choice in schooling was. This was not because of job security or the ability to pass the NPTE – there were dozens of programs that would give me both. My priority was the environment in which I began to develop my clinical eyes, ears, and hands.

I feel that I would have received a great education at several other places. However, Regis offers so much more than competency. When I left my interview a year ago, I felt a strong sense of belonging. Not only did I feel encouraged, wanted, and supported, but I also felt inspired. The faculty and students in that room were people who I knew I wanted as my colleagues and friends, challenging me and supporting me to be more in every way. They were some of the proudest advocates for PT, wanting to push the profession to excel and improve community health in any way possible.

Although I have only been in school for one semester, I feel this sense of belonging intensify every day. School is often difficult and emotionally exhausting, but I have never felt more inspired by my surroundings than I have at Regis. I truly believe the quality of people this program attracts is its greatest strength. This unique community of support, empathy, thoughtfulness, intelligence, creativity, innovation, camaraderie, and compassion is one that I dream of replicating in my own professional practice.

But, I am only one person in this community. Below are some perspectives from current students.

— Priya Subramanian, 1st year student

Perspective from 1st year students

“One of the reasons I chose Regis was the school’s focus on reflection. I absolutely believe reflection is an important clinical tool, and Regis is the only school that I know of that weaves this value into their curriculum. Additionally, Regis has an extremely diverse faculty with individuals specializing in areas such as home health, wound care, and chronic pain. I was confident that if I attended Regis, I would have the tools and resources necessary to explore any and every facet of the physical therapy profession.

Looking back I am completely confident that I made the right decision. Never before have I been part of a such a collaborative and supportive learning community. My teachers and peers genuinely care about my success, and likewise I earnestly care about theirs.”– Sam Frowley

 

“When looking for PT schools, one quality that I was really looking for was a strong sense of community.  As soon as I interviewed at Regis, I could tell that the PT department had that community that I was looking for.  A year later, I couldn’t be happier with my decision.  The environment at Regis PT is one where everyone genuine helps each other to succeed to create well rounded professionals.  I’m lucky that I get to be part of such a great family, and can’t wait to see what future holds!”   — Quincy Williams

 

“’I’d probably say the reason I chose Regis was because of how they made us feel during interview day. Besides feeling welcome and at home, they made me feel like I could truly change the profession and put my stamp on it if that’s what I longed for. As of today, I’d say the greatest thing about Regis is the never ending support system that is around us. Faculty, staff, classmates, and even those from classes above us are always going out of their way to make sure we’re doing well and have all the resources we need to succeed and give our best every day. This truly makes you feel like family, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”—Johnny Herrera

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1st year students at the Move Forward 5K!

Perspective from 2nd year students

“I wanted to come up with something other than “I chose Regis because of Interview Day,” since I’m sure so many others have that answer… but I couldn’t… because it’s the truth. I actually almost did not come to Regis University’s interview day because I had already been accepted to a couple of my top choices back home in California, and had always intended to stay in California. Fortunately, I decided to come because it allowed me to experience the amazing culture that both the faculty and students at Regis cultivate. I immediately felt this sense of closeness, of family, of caring, and of balance from the students at Regis that I had not felt at the other schools I had visited. In addition to expressing their excitement about the curriculum, the students here had so much to say about the time the spent outdoors, the friends they had made, and all the fun activities to do in Denver. Two years later, I am so glad I chose to come to Interview Day, because now I have the immense pleasure of sharing all those incredible experiences with the incoming classes.”          –Davis Ngo

 

“It was easy to choose Regis after interview day. I remember during the interview just feeling like I was being welcomed into a family I wanted to be a part of. The best part has been that this support has never stopped. I reach out to faculty when I need advice, and each and every time they have been there for me and my classmates. Our faculty support us with injuries we have ourselves and act as our PTs more often then I’d like to admit. I have more leadership training at Regis and am encouraged to be a knowledgeable but also a thoughtful and empathetic practitioner. So I chose Regis and I still choose regis because there is no place with better faculty, no place with more diverse opportunities, and no place that I would rather be to grow into a physical therapist.” –Erin Lemberger

 

“I chose Regis for PT school 2 years ago because I was interested in the global health pathway and was drawn to their Jesuit values and desire to care for the whole person. After meeting students and faculty at interview day, I was amazed at how welcomed and accepted I felt in this community. Now in my second year of the program, I feel even stronger that I made the right choice for PT school. I know I am receiving a well rounded education that will mold me into the competent, caring practitioner I wish to become.”–Rachel Garbrecht

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2nd year students after weeks of collecting dry needling data with Dr. Stephanie Albin, Dr. Larisa Hoffman, and Dr. Cameron MacDonald!

Perspective from 3rd year students

“In the middle of a snowstorm three years ago, I interviewed at Regis and knew that day I would come back in August for the beginning of a grueling but incredible three years. I loved the large class size and was in awe of all the revered faculty; so many knowledgeable people to learn from! Its reputation is strong and its standards for educating and practicing are held high. Of course, the proximity to the great outdoors sealed the deal. The physical skills of becoming a physical therapist are of course vital, but Regis is purposeful about teaching beyond this basis and digging into the invaluable ‘soft’ skills that allow us to find connection with patients and purpose in our practice. As I navigate through my final clinical rotation and see graduation on the horizon, I am more confident and ready to become a physical therapist than I ever foresaw. I can’t thank my past self enough for making the clearest choice in the midst of that snowstorm three years ago.” — Katherine Koch

“Three years ago I chose Regis because the values and philosophies the program upholds align so well with my own. Regis values service to others, a person-first philosophy, and a global perspective. From the get-go I could tell that I would further grow into the PT, and the person, that I wanted to be at this program. I truly believe that Regis is at the forefront of the evolution of patient-centered care in all respects. I know I made the right choice and feel incredibly fortunate to be Regis-educated.”    — Amber Bolen

“I chose Regis because it has high academic standards and maintains a community feel with its faculty and students. I went to Regis for undergrad and knew each faculty member cared immensely about the success of the students. Over the past three years I have continued to enjoy Regis’s community feel and have constantly felt support from everyone around me.” — Daniel Griego

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3rd year students at Regis DPT’s talent show!

Leadership Through Service: A Student Perspective

Name: Amber Bolen, Class of 2019 Service Representative

Undergrad: University of Oregon

Hometown: Eugene, OR

Fun Fact: In college I spontaneously gained the ability to wiggle my ears.

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Hi everyone! My name is Amber and I am the Regis DPT Class of 2019’s Service Representative. Being the service rep for my class means that I work with people and organizations in the community to plan and implement service projects for my class to participate in. I have also had the wonderful opportunity to be Regis’s PT Day of Service Representative for 2017, a title that has now been passed to Austin Adamson, the service rep for Regis’ class of 2020.

The prospect of serving others was one of the main draws for me to attend Regis University’s DPT program. One of the first questions I would ask my prospective schools was “what opportunities do you provide for students to be involved in serving the community?” Regis was by far the most equipped to answer this question. With service learning projects being embedded into almost every semester, domestic and international service opportunities through the Global Health Pathway, and countless opportunities and contacts for students to find more to be involved in, I was hooked.

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Regis DPT Class of 2019 students pose with Denver Parks and Rec employees after working hard mulching trees and raking leaves at Sloan’s Lake Park.

Before beginning my journey as my class’s service rep, I wanted to determine what my fellow classmates were really interested in. Being people who all made the conscious decision to live in Colorado for 2.5 years, outdoor projects were high on the list. In the past, I’ve organized day projects cleaning and keeping up parks surrounding Regis. For example, for PT Day of Service we worked at Berkeley Park to restore the playgrounds, repaint picnic tables, clear trash, and unearth perennial plants.

Another trip involved collaborating with Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado to provide trail restoration work at the Anna Mule Trails near Georgetown, Colorado. The trail restoration project was a weekend endeavor that resulted in sore muscles, a more refined grasp on what goes into creating a trail, great food, and excellent classmate bonding time.

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Regis Class of 2019 students take a break for a photo op while they work on the Anna Mule Trail near Georgetown, CO.

Being the service rep for my class has truly been an honor and I would be remised not to reflect on what I’ve learned in the process. Here are some “pearls of wisdom” I was able to collect:

  • You don’t have to be outgoing to be a student representative, but in my case I did have to be comfortable reaching out to community partners I hadn’t met yet.
  • Sometimes what you think an individual or a community needs is not actually what they need. Our job when providing service is to listen and respond in kindness if we are to do anything tangible.
  • While direct service (working with people face-to-face) is valuable and rewarding, indirect service, such as maintaining community areas, has merits too. I can’t count how many people thanked us during our park clean ups!
  • An act of service does not have to be a huge, momentous task. Small acts of service are appreciated more than we think.
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Regis Class of 2019 and 2020 students and friends take a group photo in Berkeley Park on PT Day of Service.

The fact that so many Regis DPT students are willing and excited to take part in service projects beyond what is expected by their classes speaks volumes about the type of people that our program attracts. I have never met a group a people, students and faculty alike, that are so committed to doing more for others. Service is so inextricably linked to the curriculum, values, and culture here at Regis that it has become part of who we are. As my classes at Regis come to a close and I am getting precariously close to “real world PT,” I know that the emphasis placed on these values will make us excellent physical therapists. We have learned to be sensitive to the needs of our patients and our communities and understand that physical therapists have a unique position to advocate for and implement change on individual, community, and societal levels. My hope as we all eventually graduate is for us to take everything that we’ve learned and apply it to our own clinical practice. I hope for all of us to listen, ask questions, create connections, and take initiative to make a meaningful impact in the lives of others.

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Cleaning up trash at Berkeley Park!

Please stay tuned for PT Day of Service this year, happening in early October of this year! Look for announcements from Austin Adamson, the Regis DPT Class of 2020 Service Rep and PT Day of Service rep for 2018! If you have questions about anything involving student service at Regis, please feel free to email me at abolen@regis.edu. In addition, if you have any questions about PT Day of Service 2018, Austin’s email is aadamson001@regis.edu.

 

Farewell Tom McPoil!

Name: Thomas McPoil, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Hometown: Sacramento California

Fun fact: I like to play golf – at one point, I became a 10 handicapper

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As we approached the end of July, the Regis Physical Therapy family prepared to say goodbye to some very important members of our family. With heavy hearts, but happy smiles, we say our farewells to Tom McPoil and Marcia Smith, as they are retiring and moving on to new adventures. Following 45 years as a physical therapist, 35 years of teaching, and teaching over 1800 students in over 35 states, Tom sat down with me, and I asked for any last words of wisdom. Here’s what he had to say:

  1. How do you advise that we keep a life/work balance?

“I think it’s really hard. I think that’s going to be the hardest thing for a student to figure out. I just look at the struggles you face: you want time for your personal life and clinical care. You may have to stay late and do charting. You get home and you want a break, but you want to keep up with the literature. You are worried about debt and you are worried about loan repayment. If you can, set up a time where you can read 1 or 2 papers a week, and then maybe try to establish a couple of people that want to discuss them with you. Eventually, you have to come to grips with the incredible amount of research out there…I mean it’s almost too much. That’s where the systematic reviews come in. As a clinician you’re not going to have the time to read 27 articles, but you can read one paper that summarized 27 papers for you.”

  1. What makes the difference between a ‘good’ PT and a ‘great’ PT?

“I think that’s a hard question to address. Part of it has to be your feelings of confidence about yourself. Have confidence in yourself, you know a lot. So much is thrown at you, and so quickly, that you feel like you don’t know anything. But when you go out to clinic and you come back and talk to a first year, you realize how much you do know. I think the other thing that makes an exceptional therapist is one that will always question or ask, “what is happening? What is going on?” There is one person on your shoulder that tells you, “hey, have confidence in yourself.” But there should also be another person on the other shoulder that says, “hey, you’re still learning.” And because of that, you tend to be much more aware of things. The longer you are in clinic, the easier it is to say, “well it’s just another total knee.” You know the old ad, “it quacks like a duck, it walks like a duck, it must be a duck”…that to me is where you start to see the difference: a good therapist will just treat the patient, but the exceptional therapist is the one that says, “but really, is it a duck?” and takes the time to really look at those things. The person who is always striving to do their best is sometimes going the extra mile.”

  1. Because we are Regis, we are going to reflect a little bit. What are you taking away from your time at Regis?

“Some great memories from interacting with some great students, that’s number one. As a faculty member and physical therapist I am very, very blessed, because of the fact that the individuals who are drawn to physical therapy (I know I’m speaking in generalities) really care about helping people. And I think that’s just engrained in them. I think that as a result, they’re very interested in learning to help other people. That makes my job as a teacher and as an instructor much, much easier. I think that’s the thing that I’m taking away from Regis, and why I was really happy to come here. I love the fact that the values go beyond just getting an education. And yeah, they are Jesuit values, men and women for other, the cura personalis, the magis, all the buzzwords. But I really do think, here, as a faculty and as Regis, we really help instill that on our students and I think that as a result, the students that graduate from the Regis Physical Therapy program are better humans. I think they’re better people who are going to serve society. The thing here is the sense of community. What I’ve enjoyed as a faculty member is that I really do feel like I’m involved with a community that is very caring. They’re concerned about others. I mean, they’re taking those Jesuit values, but applying it to the whole university community. There is a sense of mission and the need for people to really help one another. One of the saddest things I had happened in my career was when we had a student die in a car accident four years ago. I tell you the afternoon we heard and I had to announced it to the second years, the response from this university was phenomenal. We had counselors down here, within an hour I was meeting with the president and the director of missions, we had a service for the students here on campus. I realize that would never have happened at any other institution I’ve ever been at. Yes, people would’ve been upset, but it’s that sense of community. Yes, we’re a part of physical therapy, but we’re all a part of Regis. That to me is the piece that I’ve really enjoyed the most, and I think we do a really good job getting our students to embrace that before they leave.”

  1. What is your biggest accomplishment as a teacher, a physical therapist, and in your personal life?

“Oh that’s a hard question to answer. Well in personal life, hopefully, I was a good husband, a good father, okay with my son-in-laws and an okay grandparent. That’s what you hope for. Ultimately, you hope that God thinks you did okay. What you really hope for is that in the really little time I had with students, I was able to install firstly knowledge that they needed to go out and be successful, but also hopefully I’ve provided some type of a good role model for them.”

  1. What are you going to do now that you’re retiring?

“I really want to do some volunteer work…that’s what I really want to do! I found out about Ignatian Volunteer Corp, which is for 55 years plus people. I’ll start out doing 8 hours a week, so I’m excited about that. I’ll like to go to Denver Health and help with the foot and ankle clinic. I’ll like to get back to playing golf and pickle ball. And I’ve got the 5 grandkids.”

  1. Where do you hope to see the profession go in 10 years?

“In the 45 years I’ve been in this profession, we’ve made huge strides. What I hope for with the profession is that we work to get increased reimbursement…I think that’s huge. We have to do more to convince the public that we are primary care providers. I hope that the future physical therapists will have direct access, that they’ll be recognized as a primary care providers for neuromusculoskeletal disorders, and that they’ll have the ability in their clinic to use diagnostic ultrasound.”

  1. Any last advice for our class?

Keep at it! Remember you have a lot of knowledge and a lot of information. Just try to balance things, and it’s not easy. Try to balance it so you don’t feel like you’re neglecting your personal life or your work.”

 

Thank you, Tom, for your dedication to the betterment of our profession. We will miss you very dearly at Regis, and we wish you all the best in your new adventure in life! Congratulations!

 

Tom also wanted to make sure that everyone knows he will have his Regis email, listed here (open forever) and it will be the best way to contact him. He will love to hear from people! tmcpoil@regis.edu

 

Written by: Pamela Soto, Class of 2019

Regis DPT Students Present: “LGBT+ 101”

 

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Taylor Tso, Hannah Clark, Felix Hill (left to right)

Regis University first-year DPT students Felix Hill, Hannah Clark, and Taylor Tso recently held a session for their classmates entitled “LGBT+ 101 for Student Physical Therapists.” The presentation covered foundational terminology and concepts related to LGBTQIA+ communities, a brief overview of LGBT+ healthcare disparities, as well as tips for making clinical spaces more inclusive. Here are some thoughts from the presenters related to key foundational concepts, what motivated them to present on this topic, and what their plans are to expand on this work in the future:

What does LGBTQIA+ stand for?

LGBTQIA+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual.

 

What is the difference between gender and sex?

Both sex and gender exist on spectrums. A person’s sex is assigned to them at birth based on their genitalia, typically as either male or female. Intersex people are born with a unique combination of sex traits such as hormones, internal sex organs, and chromosomes. Gender involves a complex relationship between our bodies (think biology and societally determined physical masculine and/or feminine attributes), identities (think inherent internal experience), and expressions (think fashion and mannerisms). While gender is commonly thought of as a binary system (men and women, boys and girls), there are people whose identities do not fall within either of these categories exclusively, or even at all. While many people identify with the gender often attributed to the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), there are others who do not share this experience (transgender).

 

Does gender identity have anything to do with sexual orientation?

No! You cannot make assumptions concerning someone’s sexual orientation based on the way they express their gender or based on their gender identity. Sexual orientation simply has to do with whom someone is sexually attracted to or not. It also has nothing to do with how sexually active someone is!

 

Why did you feel it was important to present on this topics?

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 “In spite of our community’s unique healthcare needs and the stark disparities that affect LGBT+ people’s access to healthcare, typical DPT programs offer little to no education that would prepare you to treat LGBT+ patients. We wanted our cohort to be competent and confident in treating this population.” –Felix

“Felix recognized this need at Regis early on and has been working closely with our faculty to develop more inclusive and comprehensive educational materials. As an ally, I have been honored to work with Felix and other members of PT Proud (the first APTA recognized LGBT+ advocacy group) in this process of educating ourselves and others. I believe that the field of physical therapy can do a better job of caring for LGBT+ patients and I want to be a part of the solution.” –Hannah

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What do you believe was the main impact of this presentation?

 “Facilitating educational exposure to LGBT+ topics that people may or may not have had knowledge of before. This presentation sparks curiosity and lays down a baseline understanding for healthcare professionals to better their communication, and thus, quality of care for their LGBT+ patients.” –Taylor

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So you have given this presentation—now what?

 This was just the beginning! Due to negative past experiences and fear of discrimination, many LGBT+ people will go to extremes to delay care. Even if someone has access to health insurance and can afford to come see a PT, which many do not, people are likely to wait until their condition is very serious, which then contributes to poorer outcomes.

We will work to share our knowledge widely throughout the U.S., starting with a presentation at CU in August. But ultimately, workshops are not enough! As board members of PT Proud, the LGBT+ catalyst group in the HPA section of the APTA, we want to ensure that physical therapy professionals across the country receive a basic level of LGBT+ competency training, which will ultimately require changes to DPT and PTA curricula. We will also be working with PT Proud’s Equity task force to influence laws and policies to increase LGBT+ healthcare access.

Felix, Hannah, and Taylor all look forward to the prospect of future presentations.

 

How can I learn more?

Follow PT Proud on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

Feel free to leave a comment on this post with any questions or thoughts as well!