Physical Therapy during COVID-19: reflections from Regis DPT Faculty

Regis DPT faculty Alicia Lovato, Amy Rich, and Jenny Logan share their experiences practicing during COVID-19 in both home health and inpatient settings.

Thank you so much for your tremendous service, your mentorship, and your vulnerability in sharing your experiences. We miss seeing you in person so much and are so proud to call you our faculty and mentors.

~Alicia Lovato, DPT, North Rehab Lead, SCL Home Health~

This Pandemic… Has established fierce leaders

  • Has brought valid fear and anxiety.
  • Has demonstrated the strength and resilience of our team.
  • Has excelled our Telehealth innovations.
  • Has promoted critical thinking on how to keep our Home Health clinicians and patients safe (have to get creative when you don’t have that lovely PPE bin set up for you in the hospital hallway). 
  • Has increased my knowledge and awareness of how to treat patients diagnosed with COVID.
  • Has taken its toll emotionally and taken me outside of my comfort zone.
  • Has made me so grateful for my health and ability to work.
  • Has amplified my fierceness for this profession.
  • Has reminded me to have compassion for myself and others.

I miss seeing all of your faces at Regis. I can’t imagine the feelings and emotions that this has brought up in your education and personal life. Like good ole Dolly Parton said, “Storms make trees take deeper roots.”  Hopefully by the end of this we will be like Wild Fig Trees (per Google search these tree roots can dig down 400ft!). 

 

Working as an inpatient acute care physical therapist during COVID-19: A perspective

~Amy J. Rich, PT, DPT, NCS, Senior PT, University of Colorado Health~

*this opinion reflects the perspective of the individual and not necessarily that of the organization*

It’s 11:15am and I’m getting ready to call into my daily COVID-19 phone call from the rehabilitation team leadership in order to get updated on daily changes and progress, personal protective equipment updates and the number of patients in house who have tested positive for COVID-19.  While I await to virtually connect into our meeting, I reflect on 5 words that seem to define my experience of watching COVID-19 flip all perspectives within my healthcare institution upside-down:  Anxiety, Grief, Compassion, Empathy and Innovation. Never in my 20 years of practicing in the hospital and ICU setting have I seen such circumstances as I have now due to COVID-19.  One vivid memory I will recall is working the Sunday after our Governor instituted a “stay at home” policy due to the Coronavirus.  It was such an odd sensation to be driving TO work in an environment where patients were positively infected with COVID-19 while the rest of the community stayed home.  I entered the hospital donning my newly mandated mask, keeping my head down, noting that the hallways were eerily silent.  Just a few days before, the hospital had mandated a “no visitor” policy in an effort to protect the safety of our patients.  This invisible virus, over the span of a few weeks, progressively took away our outpatient clinic visits, our non-emergent surgical procedures, our visitors, our administrative assistants and our cafeteria workers among others.  The hospital went from a bustling “city” of people and procedures and socialization to a quiet empty space where essential healthcare workers, with masks on at all times, prepared for the surge.  The surge of the virus bringing the sickest of the sick to our doorstep. 

During this time, my perspective was of an environment filled with anxiety and fear of the unknown mixed with a strength and courage to combat the COVID-19 virus.  It is difficult to feel calm when everyone around you is wiping all surfaces with cavi-wipes, keeping a 6-10 foot distance from one another and wearing masks at all times.  It is an odd feeling to practice social distancing with your peers, but then walk into a patient’s room to perform a max assist transfer with them to enable them to get out of bed to a chair.

As the days progressed and the rules for social distancing tightened, I felt a bit of grief surround our hospital community. Grief over losing our “normal,” grief over watching family members have to say their goodbyes and stay at home instead of by their loved one’s bedside, grief over watching our bustling hospital community slowly become quieter as we prepared for the surge.

But in the midst of this extreme fatigue and anxiety and grief, I also saw signs of hope.  Leadership gave constant reminders to show compassion for our patients and advocate on their behalf to their family members and compassion for ourselves during this time.  One such memory is facilitating ambulation for the first time with a patient who had a severe traumatic brain injury.  His wife had been at his bedside every day up until the moment she was asked to stay home due to COVID-19.  She needed to be a part of this milestone of walking.  As I prepared the patient for ambulation, the nurse was able to facetime his wife via iPad.  While this patient would not look up and out from under his helmet for myself or the nurse, he was able to stand upright, attend to task, and take steps under the encouragement of his wife from the iPad shown in front of him.  Another bright spot of hope is the unimaginable outpouring of support from within our organization and from our community.  We have had offers for home-made masks and food, free access to meditation smart phone applications and even free coffee!  Peers are offering to donate vacation pay and individuals without work can apply to be placed in a resource management pool in order to earn a paycheck during this stressful time. 

From an inpatient rehabilitation perspective, I feel this COVID-19 virus has bound my rehabilitation team in a way I could never have anticipated.  As the COVID-19 surge preparation began, our rehabilitation team leadership asked for volunteers to be on the COVID-19 “A” team.  These are the physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech language pathologists that have volunteered to step INTO the rooms to provide essential health care for patients with COVID-19. These therapists are working with these patients providing essential rehabilitation in order to maximize functional outcomes while also reducing the risk of their colleagues being exposed to this virus.  This self-less act has put me in awe of my team members.

The innovation seen during these times is also amazing.  For example, I was able to provide PT intervention for a patient intubated via endotrach to a BiPAP machine!  This innovation brought forth by an interprofessional team of physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists allowed for appropriate ventilation for the patient while saving a mechanical ventilator for those that have no other option.

Through the leadership of our Inpatient Rehabilitation Educator and fellow Regis graduate, Jennifer Gunlikson, the rehabilitation staff received constant and pertinent information along with a platform to be innovative.  Her efforts in combination with our entire organization’s leadership has kept us informed, safe and calm.  One of the greatest pieces of education was for all patient care employees to understand how and which personal protective equipment should be used with patients who have COVID-19 and for patients who need to be protected from the virus.  As information brought forth by the CDC was ever-changing, so was our education.  Detailed information frequently and in various platforms was provided so that use of PPE was safe, effective, and efficient.

As a rehabilitation team, we banded together to make innovative discharge plans and identify key needs for ongoing education surrounding the COVID-19 virus.  We came together as a team to facilitate quick and safe discharge plans for patients who were not positive with COVID-19 in order to get them out of the hospital.  We increased treatment times and frequencies, we increased family training (including virtual training over iPad and smart phones) in order to maximize function and facilitate a safe discharge out of the hospital.  We also came together to share our individual expertise to the rehabilitation team, providing increased mentoring of therapists for practice in the ICU and increased training on mechanical ventilators and respiratory equipment.  With collaboration from our community Doctor of Physical Therapy programs at Regis University and the University of Colorado, we were able to develop a training video on respiratory pathology and common interventions to maximize ventilation and mobilize secretions.

The battle to contain COVID-19 and care for our patients is not yet complete, and the future is still uncertain.   We will continue to feel anxiety, grief, compassion, empathy and innovation as we navigate these unexpected times.  But in the meantime, we hope we have flattened the curve, we are prepared, we are strong and we will overcome.

 

A Day in the Life of a PT Treating Patients with COVID-19: true stories from the front lines

~Jenny Logan, PT, DPT, NCS, Senior PT, University of Colorado Hospital~

I park my car in the parking lot of the University of Colorado Hospital and begin my walk into the hospital. I pass night shifters leaving the hospital still wearing a mask. I momentarily feel exposed and naked without a mask. I head to the small office that the COVID therapy team has been relegated to in order to decrease exposure. I grab my surgical mask and begin to chart review.

Patient A (55 y/o male, no past medical history, anesthesiologist), day 29 of hospital stay, 21 days in ICU, mechanically ventilated x 18 days. Per chart, patient is medically ready to discharge when cleared by PT.

Patient B (26 y/o male, no past medical history) 34 days in the ICU, 31 days on mechanical ventilation, decannulated from ECMO 6 days ago, extubated yesterday

Patient C (37 y/o female, history of HTN, DM, obesity, Spanish speaking, undocumented, no insurance), 27 days in ICU, trach placed five days ago, still mechanically ventilated. Decannulated from ECMO 10 days ago.

Patient D (65 y/o female, no past medical history, Spanish speaking, undocumented, no insurance), 18 days in the ICU, still mechanically ventilated x 15 days.

Patient E (39 y/o male, no past medical history), hospital stay x 32 days, mechanical ventilation x 28 days, trach placed 7 days ago.

Patient F (53 year old male, no past medical history, Spanish speaking, undocumented, no insurance). 37 days in ICU, trach placed 4 days ago. PEA arrest x 3.

 Patient G (45 y/o female, history of HTN and obesity), 18 days in ICU, 12 days on mechanical ventilation.

I grab my N-95 mask that was reprocessed yesterday using UV light. Is it really still effective? I can’t think about this too much. I have work to do.

I head to see my first patient, Patient A. I don my N-95 mask, yellow gown, gloves and face shield. Immediately my nose begins to itch. Why does this always happen the moment I put on my mask?

The patient is sitting in bed, chatting on his phone but immediately hangs up when he realizes that I am from PT. I assist him to ambulate in the room without a walker. He is very unsteady on his feet and but he only loses his balance twice which is an improvement from yesterday. He can only tolerate 30’ to the door and back twice before needing a rest break. Despite his shortness of breath, his SpO2 remains above 90% on room air. I ask if we can call his wife to discuss discharge planning. Once she is on the phone, I explain that her husband is ready to discharge home today. She begins to cry tears of joy. It has been 29 days since they have seen each other. I explain that he will need to quarantine himself at home for 14 days to avoid exposure to his family. This means that we will need to send him home with a walker because he cannot walk safely or independently without it. Neither seems bothered by this despite the fact that he was working as an anesthesiologist prior to contracting COVID and was an avid cyclist and skier. I also explain that she will need to assist with his medications at home. This is for a man who managed medications for a living but now has cognitive impairments that will prevent him from doing this safely on his own. I review the home exercise program that I have created for him and provide a few TheraBands. He will likely be unable to receive home health PT as he has yet to test negative for COVID. I exit and wish him well at home. “Thank you for everything you have done for me,” he says.

I head to the Neuro ICU, which has been transformed into a COVID ICU. I catch a nurse as she heads from one room to the next.

“How is Patient B doing this morning? Stable after extubation? Can I work with him?” I say. Yes, please, says the nurse as she rushes into her next room where the patient is crashing.

The patient is drowsy but wakes easily when I say his name. I introduce myself and explain that I am here to help him get moving. His eyes widen and he whispers, barely audible, “ok.” His voice is very weak likely due to the amount of time spent on a ventilator. I administer a CAM-ICU, which is positive for ICU delirium. He does not know why he is in the hospital and he thinks that the date is in April. He was admitted in April but it is now May. He looks shocked when I tell him the date and that he is in the hospital for coronavirus. I explain that he has been very sick in the ICU for weeks and on many medications that have made him lose track of time and forget everything that has happened to him. I ask him to raise his arms and he can barely lift them past 30 degrees of shoulder flexion. He cannot lift his legs off the bed in a straight leg raise. I help him move to the edge of the bed with maximal assist. He feels very dizzy. His blood pressure drops initially but stabilizes quickly. He seems to have forgotten how to use his arms to help support him while sitting on the edge of bed. After several minutes, he finds his equilibrium and can sit up with only a minimal amount of assist. He whispers, “This is so cool.”

Periodically someone knocks on the glass door and gives a thumbs up. It is a question. Am I doing ok in the room? Do I need anything? Usually the answer is no. I’ve got this. This is what I do – working in an ICU to help patients regain function. But it’s nice to know that I am part of a team that has my back and is working to help each other.

I move on to the next patient, Patient C, who I have been working with for a few weeks. “Do you want to try standing today?” She vigorously nods her head. She can’t talk because she has a tracheostomy but she can write. She writes that she has been waiting for me all day because she can’t stand being in the bed any longer. She also writes that she feels sad today. She misses her family and really wants to talk to them, especially her sister. I tell her that her sister went to rehab today (her sister also has COVID and our rehab has been to converted to a COVID only rehab) so maybe we can try to arrange a Face Time session later. She needs less help to sit up at the edge of the bed today. With help from me and the nurse, she stands but can only stand for ~ 30 seconds. She sits back down and looks frustrated. “Why can’t I walk?” she writes. I try to explain that she has been in the hospital and very sick for weeks. It has made her muscles very weak and her lungs unable to provide enough oxygen to her body. She will have to re-learn how to do just about everything.

As I walk down the hall to take a short break (ie remove my mask, breath some fresh air, scratch the itch I’ve had on my nose for hours), a physician assistant stops me. “We would really like for you to work with this patient because we think she is too weak to wean off the ventilator.” Roger that. Mask back on, no time to rest. This patient, Patient D, is on spontaneous settings on the ventilator, meaning that she is doing all of the work to breath on her own. Her respiratory rate is high so I cue her to breathe deeply and slowly. I show her the numbers on the telemetry monitor as visual feedback and she is able to slow her respiratory rate. I assist her to the edge of bed just as her medical team walks by. They wave at her through the glass and she waves back. After the session as I leave the room, the respiratory therapist tells me that the team was so impressed with how she did while mobilizing that they are going to extubate her today. “Yesssssss!” I think to myself.

I meet up with my OT colleague to see our next patient together, Patient E. He is too deconditioned to tolerate two separate sessions. He is awake but fidgety. I walk in and remind him who I am. He says, “Hey, how are you?” He has a speaking valve over his trach and I am hearing his voice for the first time in a week. “It’s so good to hear your voice,” I say. “Can I have a diet coke?” he asks. I explain that he has not yet been cleared to swallow by the speech therapist because his muscles for swallowing are weak just like the rest of his body. Once sitting at the edge of the bed, he asks again “Can I have a diet coke?” I explain again why this is not yet possible. OT and I assist him to stand and pivot onto the bedside commode. After he catches his breath, “Can I have a diet coke?” We stand and pivot into a chair. “Can I have a diet coke? Please let me have a diet coke. Can I talk to the diet coke boss?” I assure him that I will speak to the diet coke boss (ie SLP) when we are finished. Outside of the room, I say to OT, “He really presents like someone with an anoxic brain injury – so perseverative and unable to remember from one minute to the next.”  “Yeah, that’s tough. He’s so young,” she says.

As I gear up to head into my next patient’s room, someone walking by yells that the neighbor is disconnected from the ventilator. I already have on PPE so I go in. The patient has self-extubated and I suddenly find myself alone in a code-like situation. I scramble for the ambu bag and begin giving breaths to the patient manually. It takes a few minutes for nurses and doctors to get all of their PPE on. Once in the room, they take charge. The patient’s oxygen saturation is dropping quickly so I help to restrain the patient while the physicians quickly and expertly re-intubate him.

After my tachycardia subsides, I decide it is time for a break. I grab food that someone has donated to the hospital. Once back in the office, my OT colleague on rehab tells me “Remember that patient you worked with that had a brachial plexus injury from poor positioning in prone? She is getting some return in her arm and is now walking.”  “What?!? That’s awesome!” I say. “ I’m so happy she is making such good progress. She was a hot mess when I evaluated her in the ICU.”

I check in with the nurse for my next patient, Patient F. “I don’t know,” she says. “He has been really agitated and tried to pull out his trach a little while ago. But I guess you can try.” As I walk in, the patient is restless and attempting to get out of bed. I calmly begin speaking to him in Spanish, reminding him where he is and why he’s here. His body begins to relax a bit. His sheets still have bloodstains from when he tried to pull out his trach earlier today. I help him move to the edge of the bed and he is suddenly very calm. I notice photos of his family in the room so I bring them over and we talk about his family. I don’t recognize the patient from the photos as he has lost at least 50lbs from his time in the hospital. Like so many others, he has been in the ICU for weeks, most of that time on a ventilator with a trickle of nutrition going into his stomach from a tube in his nose. Today he takes his first steps. He is like a newborn learning to walk again, feet too narrow and then too wide, hands holding him up on either side. After the session the patient is calm in bed, his agitation having ceased. The nurse is amazed and grateful.

My final patient of the day, Patient G, is a nurse who works at a rehab facility. She has a gentle southern drawl and a great sense of humor. Her arms are so weak that she cannot bring her hand to scratch her face or feed herself or hold her phone to talk to her family. Her sister calls while I’m in the room and I hold the phone to her ear so she can talk to her. She is able to stand for the first time today with the Sara Stedy. She does a little shimmy while standing because she is so excited. We laugh. It feels good to laugh.

At the end of the day, back in my car, I breathe a sigh of relief. It’s been another good day of work but I’m exhausted. As I drive away, I see signs saying “Thank you healthcare workers.” I feel grateful to have chosen a career that allows me to fight this pandemic from the front lines, giving the gift of function back to my patients.

 

 

Hey Class of 2022, Why Regis?

Interviews are right around the corner for prospective Regis DPT students, and current students and faculty could not be more excited to welcome them to our campus. We wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on just a few of the myriad of diverse reasons that our current students chose Regis. Some first-year students reflected on the major choice they made just one year ago. Radiating themes that seem to have drawn the class in include: obvious inclusiveness within the program, a unique emphasis on service to others, seemingly endless opportunities, and adventure in the beautiful state of Colorado. Meet some of our amazing students!

Brittney Galli

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Hey all! My name is Brittney, I am a Colorado native who knew I would miss the mountains WAY too much if I chose to attend grad school in another state. Luckily for me, Regis University offers one of the best DPT programs in the country complete with 3-4 different clinical opportunities, hands-on lab experiences, and a variety of different ways to get more involved in the community.  The core Jesuit values that Regis embodies really emphasize inclusiveness, justice, teamwork, and the importance of making the world a better place: these are all concepts that I hold dear to my heart, so I knew that Regis was exactly where I was meant to be.
I had a wonderful yet somewhat unique experience applying to Regis: I actually applied a total of THREE times before being accepted into the program. Throughout my journey, I had immense support from the admissions office on how to improve my application and set myself apart from other interviewees: with an excellent program comes an extremely competitive pool of applicants, so I kept improving and growing so that one day I would be among those accepted into the program.
All of the hard work and perseverance was COMPLETELY worth it: I am finally a member of the Regis DPT family and I would not want to be anywhere else! This program provides you all the support and tools you will need to succeed in whatever avenue you choose to pursue through a variety of intriguing coursework and a faculty who cares deeply about each and every individual in the program. Every day I am so excited to go to class and learn about how to become the best DPT I can possibly be all while still growing and improving as an individual. And in my spare time I am of course taking in all the beauty that Colorado has to offer.
Arianna Amendariz
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The interview process at Regis was my main drive to pursue my education here. The current students, faculty, and staff were all very welcoming and reassuring as to why we made it as far as we did–we all had the passion and desire to foster a positive difference in the community through physical therapy. The classes and professors continue to fuel that ambition every day.
Lena Parker 
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My name is Lena Parker and I am a first year SPT at Regis. My reason for choosing Regis University to receive my DPT degree is due to their strong value system. The Jesuit values of Regis University include cura personalis, doing more for others, and embracing a holistic approach. I had interviews at other schools that did not have an organized value system, and it absolutely made Regis stand out.
I was concerned at first because I am not a Jesuit, nor  have I ever practiced the Catholic faith. I was born and raised as a Shinnyo Buddhist. However, as I learned more about the Jesuit values, I found that they are broad and universal. Despite using language such as “God”, I could still deeply relate to and apply the Jesuit ideals. Another concern of mine was that the values were a facade and were not actually practiced by faculty and staff. During my first semester, I was relieved to see that the faculty regularly support the Jesuit values, without preaching them. I always feel supported physically and emotionally by the faculty. They emphasize community service as much as possible. We are always reflecting on our experiences to ensure that we as students can support ourselves, and therefore support our future patients.
Regis University is very accepting of people of all denominations, faiths, or lack of faith. I believe that these values are providing me with a unique and wholesome experience and shows that the school is not just trying to produce more robotic physical therapists. Regis truly cares about its students, and I am extremely glad that I chose this school to pursue my career goals.
Peter Lee 
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Regis stood out to me in my choices of DPT programs because I felt like Regis actively wanted me to be a part of their program. The general lack of responsiveness from programs during the application process can be discouraging, but Regis obviously placed value on their prospective students.
As an immigrant who came from a place that received assistance from all around the World in times of need, global health is important to me. I hope to one day be a patient-centered therapist who empowers diverse communities. Regis’s Global Health Pathway allows me to practice and serve with a global perspective; it played a big role in my decision to enroll.
Suzanne Peters
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I am an incredibly indecisive person. Therefore, I am thankful that Regis stood out so far above the other schools I was applying to, making this major life decision so easy. The highlights for me during my interview process included the abundance of opportunities and the personable attitudes of the students and staff on interview day and throughout my admissions process.
Opportunities at Regis include, but are by no means limited to, service learning, the Global Health Pathway, and many student government roles. Last year, I felt like I could see myself being apart of this intricate network of roles and growing opportunities. A year later, it has become a reality and I am so thankful! Anyone who is excited to be challenged and grow as a person, student, and a future clinician should pursue Regis.
Additionally, my personality meshed well with Regis students almost immediately both at interview day and a year later when I stepped into Claver Hall for the first time as an official student. The attitude here is friendly, helpful, and upbeat. I have found that the way the current students and staff interacted with us on interview day was direct and genuine, which to me is extremely important and reflective of the character here. Both the staff and students are true to themselves.
Lastly, you cannot beat this location! I am from the Midwest and have loved my move to Denver. It is so great to get out to the mountains every weekend and recharge. There are many new hobbies to explore here and there always seems to be a classmate who is an expert and is ready to help you learn. That’s why Regis!
@regis_dpt

Second Year Students Kick off “Toolkit Talks”

“Toolkit Talks” were instigated by second year students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler.

“The three of us were talking during Spring Break and reflecting on the diverse experiences and knowledge that our class has and how much we would love to learn from each other. We learn a lot in class from our professors, but we realized that there is a rich untapped resource of knowledge in our peers. So, we proposed a platform similar to TEDTalks and now we have ToolKit Talks—an opportunity to learn from our peers and add more knowledge to our ever-expanding PT toolkit.” -Emily Cornelius

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2nd Year Students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler:  Creators of “Toolkit Talks” 

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In Tara Dirocco’s session “Chill Out: Meditation to Help Get You Through,” Tara shared her background in yoga and meditation with an incredibly revitalizing “Love and Kindness Meditation.”

Jack Anderson shared inspiring insights from his favorite novel “Legacy” in his session “New Zealand All-Blacks: Using Sports to Learn About Life.”

 

 

Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Ira Gorman discusses healthcare policy and PT advocacy

Like most physical therapists, my passion for PT arose from the desire to empower people to achieve their greatest state of well-being and functional independence. However, as I progress in my education, I am learning that the simple goal of helping people can be far more complex in our convoluted healthcare system. Furthermore, if I want to truly serve society, I cannot simply treat individual patients. I must advocate for larger changes through public health.

To elucidate some of the confusion around healthcare,  Dr. Ira Gorman speaks today about the current healthcare system, the need for awareness and advocacy to advance public health policies, and recent changes in the practice of PT.

-Priya Subramanian, SPT- Regis University

Practice What You Preach: Modeling a Lifestyle of Movement

Name: Tara Dirocco, Class of 2021

Undergraduate: UC Berkeley

Hometown: Santa Barbara, CA

Do you find yourself needing PT from being in PT school?

Is this the most you’ve sat still in a long time?

These questions consumed me on my first week of PT school. I could not handle (or believe!) all of the sitting, after being a PT aide at an aquatic center where I spent the past year moving around all day in a pool.

Feeling the ironies of my situation, knowing that a sedentary lifestyle is the reason many patients will come to see me in the future, I decided to make my PT school experience a challenge.

How much could I move in a sedentary environment?

How could I remain physical?

How could I find my own therapy, all day long?

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Standing desk set up with computer/books at eye level

With some help from biomechanist and movement advocate Katy Bowman, I hit the drawing board.

Katy Bowman notoriously says, “Don’t just sit there, but don’t just stand there either.” Stagnancy is the problem— not sitting, not standing. A lack of movement is the root of many health ailments. We sit all day, move intensely for an hour, and expect our tissues to be compliant. Poor tissues.

Movement is linked with increased productivity and just about every health benefit…so as movement experts, why isn’t movement woven into the very fabric of our learning regimen? Why aren’t we innovating every day to find new ways to help those in stagnant jobs improve their situation? Why aren’t we modeling the way?

We have a duty as physical therapists to model the way out of stagnancy and into an embodied society. Can we practice as we preach? Can we create new movement positive environments together?

We can move all day long. I dare you.

Here are my tips to all the students and human beings out there.

In class:

  1. Sit in different ways.
  2. Take your shoes off.
  3. Roll out your ankles.
  4. Stand up and take notes while standing.
  5. Do calf raises. Do calf stretches.
  6. Do squats— mini ones if you’re embarrassed.
  7. Go on a walk or climb some stairs whenever you have a break.
  8. Roll out your wrists. Stretch your wrists against the wall.
  9. Switch how you are sitting again.
  10. Cross your ankles. Uncross your ankles.
  11. Sit in a figure 4 stretch.
  12. Sit on the edge of your seat.
  13. Sit on your feet.
  14. Practice diaphragmatic breathing.

When studying:

  1. Stand! Make a fun standing desk set up out of your many textbooks.
  2. Make your computer at eye level.
  3. Lay on your belly for a while.
  4. Lay on your back and study for a while.
  5. Lay with your legs up the wall and study for a while.
  6. Lay in a hip flexor stretch and study.
  7. Perform hamstring strengthening exercises while lying on your belly.
  8. Switch the position of your legs often.
  9. Switch the arm you’re leaning on… in fact maybe don’t lean on any arm!
  10. Take movement rewards every 30 minutes.

(Please note: if you have any recent injuries, conditions, or limitations, consult with your healthcare provider team before attempting these positions, especially for a prolonged period of time)

-Tara Dirocco, 1st year student

 

Why We Chose Regis: Reflections From Current DPT Students

I interviewed at Regis roughly one year ago, and as I look back on that day, I realize my decision to accept my spot in the DPT Class of 2021 was an easy one.

I decided I wanted to pursue physical therapy when I was 18 years old. I spent over 200 hours in observation, determining the kind of PT I aspired to be. It was during that reflection that I began to understand how important my choice in schooling was. This was not because of job security or the ability to pass the NPTE – there were dozens of programs that would give me both. My priority was the environment in which I began to develop my clinical eyes, ears, and hands.

I feel that I would have received a great education at several other places. However, Regis offers so much more than competency. When I left my interview a year ago, I felt a strong sense of belonging. Not only did I feel encouraged, wanted, and supported, but I also felt inspired. The faculty and students in that room were people who I knew I wanted as my colleagues and friends, challenging me and supporting me to be more in every way. They were some of the proudest advocates for PT, wanting to push the profession to excel and improve community health in any way possible.

Although I have only been in school for one semester, I feel this sense of belonging intensify every day. School is often difficult and emotionally exhausting, but I have never felt more inspired by my surroundings than I have at Regis. I truly believe the quality of people this program attracts is its greatest strength. This unique community of support, empathy, thoughtfulness, intelligence, creativity, innovation, camaraderie, and compassion is one that I dream of replicating in my own professional practice.

But, I am only one person in this community. Below are some perspectives from current students.

— Priya Subramanian, 1st year student

Perspective from 1st year students

“One of the reasons I chose Regis was the school’s focus on reflection. I absolutely believe reflection is an important clinical tool, and Regis is the only school that I know of that weaves this value into their curriculum. Additionally, Regis has an extremely diverse faculty with individuals specializing in areas such as home health, wound care, and chronic pain. I was confident that if I attended Regis, I would have the tools and resources necessary to explore any and every facet of the physical therapy profession.

Looking back I am completely confident that I made the right decision. Never before have I been part of a such a collaborative and supportive learning community. My teachers and peers genuinely care about my success, and likewise I earnestly care about theirs.”– Sam Frowley

 

“When looking for PT schools, one quality that I was really looking for was a strong sense of community.  As soon as I interviewed at Regis, I could tell that the PT department had that community that I was looking for.  A year later, I couldn’t be happier with my decision.  The environment at Regis PT is one where everyone genuine helps each other to succeed to create well rounded professionals.  I’m lucky that I get to be part of such a great family, and can’t wait to see what future holds!”   — Quincy Williams

 

“’I’d probably say the reason I chose Regis was because of how they made us feel during interview day. Besides feeling welcome and at home, they made me feel like I could truly change the profession and put my stamp on it if that’s what I longed for. As of today, I’d say the greatest thing about Regis is the never ending support system that is around us. Faculty, staff, classmates, and even those from classes above us are always going out of their way to make sure we’re doing well and have all the resources we need to succeed and give our best every day. This truly makes you feel like family, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”—Johnny Herrera

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1st year students at the Move Forward 5K!

Perspective from 2nd year students

“I wanted to come up with something other than “I chose Regis because of Interview Day,” since I’m sure so many others have that answer… but I couldn’t… because it’s the truth. I actually almost did not come to Regis University’s interview day because I had already been accepted to a couple of my top choices back home in California, and had always intended to stay in California. Fortunately, I decided to come because it allowed me to experience the amazing culture that both the faculty and students at Regis cultivate. I immediately felt this sense of closeness, of family, of caring, and of balance from the students at Regis that I had not felt at the other schools I had visited. In addition to expressing their excitement about the curriculum, the students here had so much to say about the time the spent outdoors, the friends they had made, and all the fun activities to do in Denver. Two years later, I am so glad I chose to come to Interview Day, because now I have the immense pleasure of sharing all those incredible experiences with the incoming classes.”          –Davis Ngo

 

“It was easy to choose Regis after interview day. I remember during the interview just feeling like I was being welcomed into a family I wanted to be a part of. The best part has been that this support has never stopped. I reach out to faculty when I need advice, and each and every time they have been there for me and my classmates. Our faculty support us with injuries we have ourselves and act as our PTs more often then I’d like to admit. I have more leadership training at Regis and am encouraged to be a knowledgeable but also a thoughtful and empathetic practitioner. So I chose Regis and I still choose regis because there is no place with better faculty, no place with more diverse opportunities, and no place that I would rather be to grow into a physical therapist.” –Erin Lemberger

 

“I chose Regis for PT school 2 years ago because I was interested in the global health pathway and was drawn to their Jesuit values and desire to care for the whole person. After meeting students and faculty at interview day, I was amazed at how welcomed and accepted I felt in this community. Now in my second year of the program, I feel even stronger that I made the right choice for PT school. I know I am receiving a well rounded education that will mold me into the competent, caring practitioner I wish to become.”–Rachel Garbrecht

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2nd year students after weeks of collecting dry needling data with Dr. Stephanie Albin, Dr. Larisa Hoffman, and Dr. Cameron MacDonald!

Perspective from 3rd year students

“In the middle of a snowstorm three years ago, I interviewed at Regis and knew that day I would come back in August for the beginning of a grueling but incredible three years. I loved the large class size and was in awe of all the revered faculty; so many knowledgeable people to learn from! Its reputation is strong and its standards for educating and practicing are held high. Of course, the proximity to the great outdoors sealed the deal. The physical skills of becoming a physical therapist are of course vital, but Regis is purposeful about teaching beyond this basis and digging into the invaluable ‘soft’ skills that allow us to find connection with patients and purpose in our practice. As I navigate through my final clinical rotation and see graduation on the horizon, I am more confident and ready to become a physical therapist than I ever foresaw. I can’t thank my past self enough for making the clearest choice in the midst of that snowstorm three years ago.” — Katherine Koch

“Three years ago I chose Regis because the values and philosophies the program upholds align so well with my own. Regis values service to others, a person-first philosophy, and a global perspective. From the get-go I could tell that I would further grow into the PT, and the person, that I wanted to be at this program. I truly believe that Regis is at the forefront of the evolution of patient-centered care in all respects. I know I made the right choice and feel incredibly fortunate to be Regis-educated.”    — Amber Bolen

“I chose Regis because it has high academic standards and maintains a community feel with its faculty and students. I went to Regis for undergrad and knew each faculty member cared immensely about the success of the students. Over the past three years I have continued to enjoy Regis’s community feel and have constantly felt support from everyone around me.” — Daniel Griego

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3rd year students at Regis DPT’s talent show!

Regis DPT Students Present: “LGBT+ 101”

 

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Taylor Tso, Hannah Clark, Felix Hill (left to right)

Regis University first-year DPT students Felix Hill, Hannah Clark, and Taylor Tso recently held a session for their classmates entitled “LGBT+ 101 for Student Physical Therapists.” The presentation covered foundational terminology and concepts related to LGBTQIA+ communities, a brief overview of LGBT+ healthcare disparities, as well as tips for making clinical spaces more inclusive. Here are some thoughts from the presenters related to key foundational concepts, what motivated them to present on this topic, and what their plans are to expand on this work in the future:

What does LGBTQIA+ stand for?

LGBTQIA+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual.

 

What is the difference between gender and sex?

Both sex and gender exist on spectrums. A person’s sex is assigned to them at birth based on their genitalia, typically as either male or female. Intersex people are born with a unique combination of sex traits such as hormones, internal sex organs, and chromosomes. Gender involves a complex relationship between our bodies (think biology and societally determined physical masculine and/or feminine attributes), identities (think inherent internal experience), and expressions (think fashion and mannerisms). While gender is commonly thought of as a binary system (men and women, boys and girls), there are people whose identities do not fall within either of these categories exclusively, or even at all. While many people identify with the gender often attributed to the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), there are others who do not share this experience (transgender).

 

Does gender identity have anything to do with sexual orientation?

No! You cannot make assumptions concerning someone’s sexual orientation based on the way they express their gender or based on their gender identity. Sexual orientation simply has to do with whom someone is sexually attracted to or not. It also has nothing to do with how sexually active someone is!

 

Why did you feel it was important to present on this topics?

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 “In spite of our community’s unique healthcare needs and the stark disparities that affect LGBT+ people’s access to healthcare, typical DPT programs offer little to no education that would prepare you to treat LGBT+ patients. We wanted our cohort to be competent and confident in treating this population.” –Felix

“Felix recognized this need at Regis early on and has been working closely with our faculty to develop more inclusive and comprehensive educational materials. As an ally, I have been honored to work with Felix and other members of PT Proud (the first APTA recognized LGBT+ advocacy group) in this process of educating ourselves and others. I believe that the field of physical therapy can do a better job of caring for LGBT+ patients and I want to be a part of the solution.” –Hannah

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What do you believe was the main impact of this presentation?

 “Facilitating educational exposure to LGBT+ topics that people may or may not have had knowledge of before. This presentation sparks curiosity and lays down a baseline understanding for healthcare professionals to better their communication, and thus, quality of care for their LGBT+ patients.” –Taylor

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So you have given this presentation—now what?

 This was just the beginning! Due to negative past experiences and fear of discrimination, many LGBT+ people will go to extremes to delay care. Even if someone has access to health insurance and can afford to come see a PT, which many do not, people are likely to wait until their condition is very serious, which then contributes to poorer outcomes.

We will work to share our knowledge widely throughout the U.S., starting with a presentation at CU in August. But ultimately, workshops are not enough! As board members of PT Proud, the LGBT+ catalyst group in the HPA section of the APTA, we want to ensure that physical therapy professionals across the country receive a basic level of LGBT+ competency training, which will ultimately require changes to DPT and PTA curricula. We will also be working with PT Proud’s Equity task force to influence laws and policies to increase LGBT+ healthcare access.

Felix, Hannah, and Taylor all look forward to the prospect of future presentations.

 

How can I learn more?

Follow PT Proud on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

Feel free to leave a comment on this post with any questions or thoughts as well!

How Can the APTA Help Me?

Name: Lina Kleinschmidt

Undergrad: Pacific University

Hometown: Stuttgart, Germany

Fun fact: I was born and raised in Stuttgart, Germany

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As a physical therapy student and future physical therapist, the APTA is something you will hear about over and over again. With job opportunities, continuing education classes, research updates and legislation information, the APTA has endless amounts of information at the hands of students and professionals. However, the website and all the resources may seem a little overwhelming. Therefore, here is a little introduction into the APTA and how you can use it to further your education and career.

What is the APTA?

The APTA, or the American Physical Therapy Association, is a professional organization that represents physical therapy students, physical therapists and physical therapy assistants and has over 103,000 members. It is divided into state chapters each with a governing board. We at Regis University are fortunate to have Cameron MacDonald as an assistant professor, and he is the current president of the Colorado chapter which currently has 2,700 members. It is vital for each state to have a chapter since each state has different practice guidelines and thus must have individual legislation.

There are also sections within the APTA, which include: acute care, aquatics, cardiovascular and pulmonary, education, federal, geriatrics, hand and upper extremity, home health, pediatrics, private practice and quite a few others.  These sections allow you as a student or current PT to learn more information about different specialties. For example, I am part of the neurology section and as such, I get quarterly journals that inform me on the latest research and new updates in the realm of neurology and how it affects the physical therapy industry.

Districts are even smaller groups which are broken up by geographical location and each chapter has SIGs or special interest groups. Colorado has five statewide SIGs which include: Colorado Acute/Rehab SIG, Pediatric SIG, Private Practice SIG, PTA SIG and the Student SIG.

Continuing education (CE) classes happen often and allow students or PTs/PTAs to learn more about a specific topic and have hands on practice. I attended a vestibular and concussion CE class last fall and it completely opened my eyes to a world of physical therapy I had never heard of before. The APTA has a national conference called Combined Sections Meeting, or CSM, which is an incredible opportunity to learn about the profession and what new research developments are forthcoming. CSM is also a great way to network and get to know other practitioners in the physical therapy profession. The Colorado Chapter also has an annual convention called the Fall Convention & Expo.

How can I use the APTA?

Now that you have an introduction, it is important to know what you can do NOW. Depending on where you are in your journey, this may be different for each of you. If you are currently applying to PT school, the APTA website can help guide you in preparing for your interview questions, help you understand what is in your scope of practice depending on the state and school you apply to, and impress the faculty by understanding what is happening in the PT profession.

As you start your graduate school career, the first step is to become an APTA member! Some graduate programs require it, others do not. Either way, I highly recommend you become part of the association so you can reap the full benefits of the APTA and have your voice heard. Click here for joining the APTA. Attending state and national conventions will also give you a huge head start on understanding what the real world of physical therapy is like and they are a great chance to meet students from all over the US and also network!  The easiest step is to get involved with SIGs. Each university will have student special interest groups which hold meetings and special guest lecturers which allow students to connect and communicate about a specific PT specialty.

At Regis and CU Denver, we have multiple sSIGs that our students are involved in and I am lucky enough to be involved with the APTA sSIG this year. I will be working closely with the other sSIGs as well as the PTA schools to have a year of amazing events for our students. We hope to open their eyes to all the opportunities in Colorado. These include: panels about specialties and what to do after graduation, a kickball tournament, a national advocacy dinner and so much more!

Yes, this was a lot of information. No, I do not expect anyone to remember it all. But it is important that you get involved and find what you are passionate about. So now, go to www.apta.org and become a member today!

Budget Tips for Students

Name: Jaegger Olden

Undergrad: Central Washington University

Hometown: Aberdeen, Washington (on the peninsula, no not by Seattle)

Fun fact: my spirit animal is a hangry Terry Crews

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I have been in college for almost a decade. So you could say I am what comes close to being a professional student. However, with that title comes heaping amounts of debt. Fortunately, I have learned the art of budgeting, scholarships, and sucking up to my extreme-couponing-and-geologist wife so my debt is incredibly low. Unfortunately, most students finish their graduate degrees with six figures of student debt. I am here to share my secrets and help you avoid evil student loans (well, as much as you can).  

Budgeting

I can’t stress this enough: BUDGET YOUR MONEY. This is the key to being able to:

A) know how much money you need in scholarships/loans/income and

B) decide where your money goes

Budgeting is fairly straightforward. Create a spreadsheet with all of your expenses listed out. It is easiest to do this for each semester because, as students, we are charged tuition and given financial aid only 2-3 times per year.

Some of the categories my wife and I use are:

  • Rent
  • Utilities
  • Gas
  • Groceries
  • Internet/Cable
  • Insurance/Medical
  • Car Maintenance
  • Entertainment
  • Emergency Fund

All of this goes into our budget Excel spreadsheet. If you don’t use Excel, then you should start now. There are plenty of tutorials online if you need to refresh on the functions or even through the Regis Library/Learning Commons/Tutoring Center on campus. The best part about budgeting like this is determining how much in student loans I need to take out.

Tip: Avoid taking out your max student loan amount each semester AT ALL COSTS. This is a great way to reach your lifetime federal loan allowance (which is $138,500 with no more than $65,000 subsidized).

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Loan Repayment Strategy

I’m sorry for using the L-word, I promise you it gives me a lot of anxiety just thinking about the hole I dug for myself, but that is just our reality as students. One day, we will need to repay these loans and it’s important to have a strategy to do so.

After plenty of research, my wife and I have decided to use the Debt Snowball repayment plan. This is the famous strategy created by financial expert Dave Ramsey that bases debt repayment on the combination of psychology and interest percentages. Instead of paying off debt based on interest alone, the Debt Snowball creates a system that pays off debt based upon the total value of each individual loan to create a psychological reward as well as paying off debt as quickly as possible.

This method, along with plenty of other financial tips and advice, is featured in his incredibly successful book The Total Money Makeover, which I can’t recommend enough.

Housing

I know too well what “money dump” apartments are and how getting a cheap apartment can come with some hazards. This is typical in Denver. As of today, three students just in my class have had their cars stolen from their apartment parking lots while their managers refuse to install security cameras. Because of this, it actually can be both safer and cost effective to slightly splurge and find apartments in low crime areas. The Denver Police Department maintains a great crime map that is user friendly.
However, if you can manage it, then I suggest trying to buy a house or condo. You’re probably saying, “this guy is crazy!” but you’re putting money into someone else’s bank account every month with no equity. Not to mention a mortgage payment is less than Denver rent. So if you have enough savings to go into a down payment, or can have family help, go for it! If you’re going the family route, then I suggest giving them a return on their investment via the equity upon selling. It is truly a win-win.

Shopping

Shopping is easily the biggest way we save money. I am infatuated with couponing and am getting pretty good at it…to the point of saving up to $30 a week on groceries. I’m currently a part of a coupon club that sends me coupons daily…go figure. I also use the Krazy Coupon Lady. The last major strategies I use is shopping at Costco or Sam’s club for bulk items such as meat to freeze, fruit, vegetables, and nonperishables.

However, if you are really interested in saving money and time on healthy meals, check out my wife’s blog post about eating healthy in college. She goes over our full healthy cooking system and how we save money on our groceries.

Read more about cheap and healthy eating in college HERE.  

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Saving Money at Regis University

Being a graduate student at Regis University does have its perks! Take advantage of the amenities. My favorites are the gym, 10 free local transit passes a week, and 2 free swimming passes a week for any Denver Parks and Recreation’s Aquatic facility. One of the better pools close to the university is the Berkeley pool attached to the Scheitler Recreation Center.

Some of the other ways I save money during class are bringing my own food for lunch, bringing K-cups from Costco instead of purchasing coffee (there are two Keurigs in Claver Hall, which ends up being 34 cents a cup), getting a beer with classmates at Walker’s pub during happy hour ($1 beer), and taking advantage of free food events. I also frequently use the classroom electricity to charge devices and shower at the gym to reduce water-heating costs at home.

Income

One of the most daunting factors about being in graduate school is the lack of income. However, there are plenty of great ways to have an income with minimal time commitment. One of the easiest and best ways to do that is to turn your hobby into a job. One great way to do that is to start a money-making blog! There are countless benefits to creating a blog in college. THIS is a great post that breaks down the reasons why you should start a blog in college and THIS is a great post to help you understand how to do it!

Another great way to make money is to donate plasma. I personally donate twice a week and receive about $300 a month for less than 3 hours a week of sitting in a clinic. All plasma is donated to medical research facilities and nearly everyone at these clinics are amazing and professional people. Despite what the stigma is against plasma donations, it is a requirement that you have a home in order to donate.

Some of my other classmates use their skills as a small income like instructing rock climbing lessons once or twice a week for gym memberships or baby sitting/house sitting for friends.

A small amount of income comes a long way, but take precaution based on your performance in class. You’re a student first!

Utility Saving Tips

I got bills! Of course the more energy efficient your household is the lower the bill. One of the more helpful strategies to adapt daily is running appliances that have a high energy cost during non-peak hours. For Denver (consumers of Xcel Energy), the best times to run your appliances (dishwasher, dryer, etc.) are between 9pm and 9am.

In addition, here is a list of other easy tips:

  • Sealing doors/windows/sinks
  • Running the fan in reverse during winter
  • Don’t use heat dry in dishwasher
  • LED lights in bulk and swap out when moving out
  • Read your electricity statement: Xcel sends personalized saving tips
  • Reduce standby power (printer, TVs, gaming systems)
  • Minimize cooling by opening the windows at night (if safe)
  • Deduce shower time

Having Fun

Now I know it seems like you are not going to have time, but make time to do what you love. This will prevent getting burnt out and being miserable.

Some cheap ways of having fun is getting outside to hike, trail run, rock climb, mountain bike, or cycle. The National Park Service has an amazing yearly pass deal that pays itself off in under 8 visits.

If you’re a skier/snowboarder, then I have heard the Epic pass is fantastic. It has a student pass and pays itself off after 4 times of hitting the slopes. If you like to hangout and watch tv, save money by streaming via Netflix and Amazon Prime. If you get Spotify premium as a student, you save $3 a month and get Hulu for free.

Also, if you’re a book worm, then go get a Denver library card in combination with an app called Overdrive. You can access the ebook library, audiobooks, and most movies currently out on Redbox.

Do you have any favorite budgeting tips? Were these strategies helpful for you? Feel free to comment and share with us!

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How I Lost the Most Valuable Ligament

Name: Erin Lemberger, Class of 2020

Undergrad: University of Northern Colorado

Hometown: Littleton, CO

Fun Fact: A one humped camel is called a Dromedary and a two humped camel is called a Bactrian.

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Let me just tell you about my first semester of PT school. I’ll start off by saying that PT school is a lot of work, so of course, the first semester was stressful. But regardless, there are 80 of your closest friends that make studying, adventuring, and everything that happens in between a whole lot easier. I started the semester by buying a season pass to ski all winter long and to use as a major de-stressor when school became difficult. I have been skiing since I was a little tike, so what could go wrong? I had never been hurt skiing nor seriously injured so it couldn’t possibly happen now. Here’s my advice, kids. When the mountain does not have enough snow to open up more than one run, there’s not enough snow. Just trust me.

 

So here’s how it went. I go to Arapahoe Basin (lovingly known as A Basin) with my now boyfriend, Preston, and we’re having a great time just enjoying the weather and the snow. We ski about three runs before the resort is flooded with people also trying to ski the one run that is open. We spend about 20 minutes waiting to get on the lift that will take us to the top, so the decision to get to the top, ski all the way down, and head on home is smart. I’m happily skiing along trying to keep up with Preston, but when I get to about 50 feet from the bottom, realize I’m going a little too fast. Preston is down at the bottom and I go to stop and my ski catches a patch of ice (remember the not enough snow comment?) that takes me out. I flip over backwards and roll hard, and although the details of that fall are fuzzy, I’m sure now it was a classic plant and twist. My skis don’t pop off and my right knee is screaming in pain; I can’t stand on it, so I get my first toboggan ride down the mountain to meet Preston.

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About 20 minutes before I fell. The view is pretty right?

I’m going to start this part of the story with the advice that I would not recommend getting hurt in PT school, but I want to brag about our professors for a little bit. I think I was in denial that I ruptured my ACL, so I went to Dr. Tom McPoil and asked him to check out the knee. Tom tapes me every morning for about 2 weeks while we are trying to get MRIs and doctors appointments scheduled; he was a saint. After a few days of taping, he decides Dr. Mark Reinking should check out my knee too, thus getting two amazing faculty giving me advice. You probably know what happens next: I have surgery to reconstruct my ACL with a semitendinosus/gracilis autograft (they took my hamstrings to make a new ACL). I was thankful I could do surgery over winter break. Over the month that we had off, I got time to recover and relax instead of worrying about school. I started PT off campus and then switched to seeing a PT in our faculty once the new semester got closer. Our faculty are incredible, understanding, kind, teaching, inspiring humans who are the reason I am fairly active for 5 months post-op. My PT, Nancy, is one of the many reasons I am certain that I want to go into this profession because she makes me laugh when PT for an ACL reconstruction is painful. Although I would not recommend tearing your ACL, I have gotten more perspective than I could have imagined from the process.

 

Okay, now go back. I tore my ACL. It was an absolute pain (in the knee) 90% of the time. It was hard watching my friends all ski while I was stuck at the lodge, it’s terrible that I still have pain running even though it’s normal, and I have a huge mental block doing most physical activity now, which is hard. Here’s my advice: Take care of yourself. Have fun, but within healthy limits for yourself. I recommend you also know that life simply happen. Having a positive outlook has made a huge difference for me. Sometimes you just have to see the brighter side. That all being said, I am here, I am passing, and I am chugging along just fine in PT school. So, if you do injure yourself while in school, remember that it is all doable. That’s a promise!

Here’s some other friends that are going through injuries in PT school and some advice they have for dealing with it:

Ryan Pineda, Class of 2020: Lisfranc fracture, surgery completed, in PT currently

“Find a good Netflix show to break up the studying and try not to think about

how much fun your friends are having. Also make sure to buy pass insurance for

your ski pass.”

 

Gabe Lawrence, Class of 2020: meniscal tear, surgery happening this week!

“Make sure to stay active and find something to take your mind off the injury

while you’re rehabbing. It’s easy to be lazy when you have an excuse. Just

because you‘re down a limb doesn’t mean you can’t use the other three.”

 

Jake Berndl, Class of 2020: bilateral inguinal hernia, surgery completed, progressing back to normal physical activity

“Don’t sustain a more serious injury like the above three. Put a positive spin

on your down time – catch up on studying while your classmates are out

having fun instead of studying. This way, when tests or finals roll up, you’re

prepared. Also, don’t forget to ask your surgeon the important questions…”

 

How to Spend your Time before Starting Physical Therapy School

Name: Kelsie Jordan

Undergrad: Oregon State University

Hometown: Portland, OR

Fun Fact: I hiked Longs Peak the weekend before finals week (along with some other classmates – who needs to study, right?)

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Take a deep breath. Now, let it out slowly. Soak in this feeling of relief. At least for this moment, you have nothing to be stressed about – you actually are  accepted into physical therapy school. The applications are over, the interviews are complete, and you’ve survived that awful waiting period when your future was in the hands of an admissions team. Now, after what may have been a grueling process of endless pros and cons lists for some, you have finally decided which physical therapy program you are going to call your own. Doesn’t that feel amazing?

So…now what? Well, the good news is you’ve already done the hard part and this period between being admitted to PT school and actually starting is pretty much smooth sailing! Here’s what you can do to navigate this in-between time:

Study and review anatomy

Just kidding! Do not worry about reviewing anything. You’ll have the entirety of PT school to do all the studying your heart desires. You’ll also have a whole semester dedicated to learning anatomy, which will likely be much more in-depth than your undergraduate course, so looking over muscle attachments before starting school won’t give you any advantage. So please give your brain a break. Don’t review any material. Seriously. Don’t do it. Got it?

 

Graduate college

If you’re still finishing up your last year of undergrad, finish strong. Enjoy your last couple months of college, and then really enjoy your last true summer vacation. After all, you’ll have summer classes during PT school and afterward, you’ll be out in the real world!

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My mom and I at the Portland Shamrock Run 15K…it rained the entire time

Get in touch with your classmates

Most, if not all, programs have some sort of Facebook page for their incoming class. Join it! Introduce yourself, ask questions, creep on your classmates, etc. It’s always a little awkward trying to get to know people you haven’t met yet, but down the road, it’s always fun to share stories about first impressions of profile pictures with all your friends. Plus, this is a great way to find roommates, if you’re looking.

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Using extra free time to visit friends in Seattle.

Take care of logistics

Check your new school email regularly to make sure you stay in the loop by receiving all the updates and information regarding your cohort. There are probably a few compliance requirements you need to take care of, such as submitting immunization records and getting CPR certified. Also, don’t forget to apply for financial aid and scholarships – FAFSA is due on April 15th! Non-logistically, it might be a good idea to make a bucket list of things to do in your new home so that once you’re waist-deep in midterms, you don’t forget all the fun adventures you want to try.

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More hiking in Portland, just prepping for life in the Rockies.

Find housing/roommates

If you’re moving somewhere new for school, you obviously need to find somewhere to live. Again, if you’re looking to live with classmates, Facebook is a great tool. Zillow is also your best friend. Better yet, if you can swing it, try to visit the area so you can take a look at housing in person. I’ll say from personal experience that living close to campus is pretty great, but there are a lot of other factors that determine your ideal place to live. Definitely use current students as a resource because we all have varied experiences.

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A year without IM sports? Might as well join a city league team!

Sleep

Don’t set an alarm and instead sleep in on the weekends. There will be fewer opportunities for this in grad school, so sleep it up!

 

Spend time with your friends and family

If you’re moving away for school, you’re going to leave a lot of friends, family, and maybe even significant others behind. That doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll grow apart, but you’ll obviously have less time to spend with them. So before you move, do as many things as you can with all of those people! Maybe even plan ahead and figure out what you will do to keep in touch. Even if PT school is in the place you currently live, it does take a lot of work to balance your new schedule, new friends, new responsibilities, and new life with all the people in your old life. So make the effort to prioritize those people more than ever before you transition to grad school.

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My friends and I spent 4th of July weekend on a houseboat on Lake Billy Chinook in central Oregon.

Travel

Spend some time traveling, whether it’s to another country, another state, or just that one part of your hometown you’ve never been to before. While there are plenty of school breaks, those breaks won’t allow as much time or flexibility for travel as you have right now. Trust me, I’ve enjoyed a bunch of trips during PT school, but when there is an academic calendar to adhere to, vacation time tends to be a little more structured. Also, if you don’t feel like you have the time or money to take an extravagant trip, try to make a road trip out of your move to school. That’s what I did, and it was a blast!

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My extended family had a family reunion trip in South Carolina, so I had fun being a history nerd in Charleston

Have fun and honestly do whatever you want

Relax, take a breather, and let your brain rest (especially if you just finished undergrad). Even though there will be plenty of free time to explore and have fun during PT school, most of the time those experiences come alongside the knowledge of looming deadlines in the back of your mind, so enjoy the freedom to do what you want without anything making you feel like you need to study. Travel, sleep, drink at a beer festival, read a book, binge watch Netflix, go to a concert…If you currently have a job that you’re planning to leave right before grad school, think about leaving a few weeks early to unwind. Also, I would honestly advise that you not worry too much about saving up money – you’re already investing a lot in your education, and the couple hundred dollars that you might save by not enjoying your freedom right now won’t make much of a difference in the long run. This in-between time should be a period of rest and fun, so make that your goal.

Basically, all of that advice can be pretty much summed up into two words: do nothing.

Take care of the things you need to take care of to be compliant and financially prepared when you start school, but otherwise, just take a step back and enjoy your time however you see fit. As always, feel free to contact Erin, the Class of 2020 Admissions Representative, and I with any questions. Congratulations on finally reaching this step, and good luck in the Fall!

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“PT school, here I come!” –Me, when I finally got to Colorado.

My email address: kjordan002@regis.edu

Erin’s email address: elemberger@regis.edu

How to Rock a CSM Conference

Name: Grace-Marie Vega

Undergrad: Arizona State University

Hometown: Placentia, CA

Fun Fact: I take pub trivia very seriously!

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CSM, or the Combined Sections Meeting of APTA, is a 4-day national conference held annually,  attracting thousands of students, practitioners, and researchers in the physical therapy field. These are some things I learned from CSM 2018 in New Orleans that I hope will help you navigate through future conferences:

  1. There are so many possibilities! CSM had over 300 educational sessions over the course of three days, not including poster presentations, platform presentations, and networking events. It was a whirlwind of people, places, and free giveaways. To get the experience that you want, and to avoid option paralysis, take some time beforehand to prioritize what you really want to see! In preparation for your own national conference, download the APTA conferences app so you can add programming to your own schedule. The WiFi in the conference halls can be unreliable, so I suggest that you make a plan before you get there, and glance at the map too.

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  1. Do not underestimate your knowledge. On my first day of CSM, I chose programming with subject matter that I felt I knew well enough to discuss. It turns out that I did know it well, because I had already studied it in my coursework, and even read some of the referenced articles. Basically that program was review, and a reassurance that Regis DPT coursework incorporates current best evidence. But I could have learned new things and expanded my awareness of topics that may not get as much coverage in coursework. For the rest of the conference, I tried to pick topics that I was interested in, but not experienced in, and in doing so, I realized that I was not out of my depth. Challenge yourself, and trust that you probably know more than you think.

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  1. Use public transit! Although less convenient, it’s cheaper and arguably more fun than taxis, ubers, and car rentals. I purchased a transit pass that allowed me to utilize all local buses and trolleys. For 3 dollars a day, I rode around New Orleans with locals and CSM attendees alike, and I felt like I was experiencing the city in a much more intimate capacity. Shoutout to the good people of New Orleans who always seem willing to make conversation and give restaurant recommendations while waiting for trolleys.

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  1. Network! As a self-proclaimed hater of all networking-related activity, I urge you to do this! Allow me to make a blanket statement and say that physical therapists are friendly, kind, and wonderful people who love talking to students, sharing their knowledge, and saving lives. Asking questions in educational sessions, talking to vendors in the exhibit hall, and even making small talk with the PT sitting next to you are all ways to get more out of your CSM experience. It’s also a way to dip your toes into the ocean of job hunting. I left with business cards, new aspirations to become a travel therapist, and more free t-shirts than I care to admit.

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  1. Quality over quantity! Strike a balance between conference time and exploration time. You could easily spend your time doing nothing but CSM from dawn to dusk, and that’s awesome! But, you don’t have to do that. You can get there a day early or take a later flight out if it means you have time to wander and be inspired by a new city, new friends, or live music. Your memory of this time will likely not only include the conference, but the people you were with and the place you were in. In my opinion, when you finally get home, your heart should be full, and your feet should be sore.

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Dry Needling…Not a Type of Craft that Your Grandmother Does

Name: Katherine Koch

Undergrad: The Ohio State University

Hometown: Cleveland, OH

Fun Fact: Last summer, I climbed six 14ers

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Dry needlingnot a type of craft that your grandmother does. This type of treatment uses thin filiform needles inserted by a physical therapist into myofascial trigger points, or a tight band of muscle that might be causing pain (1). Dry needling is based on physiological evidence supported by research that is usually part of a broader treatment plan (2). If this needling sounds familiar to you, you’re not alone. Acupuncturists use the same type of needle to adjust the flow of energy, or chi, throughout meridians in the body. Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese medicine and operates based on the belief that these thin needles can relieve tension, stress, and pain when inserted by an acupuncturist (3). While you won’t be getting an itchy sweater from this treatment, it can lead to pain relief for many people. 

However, there is still confusion and debate among physical therapists and acupuncturists concerning the rights and responsibilities of physical therapists in performing dry needling on their patients. This debate of dry needling by physical therapists was recently taken to a Denver district court when the Acupuncture Association of Colorado (AAC) challenged the Colorado State Physical Therapy Board (Board). The AAC claimed that physical therapists had not undergone enough training to perform dry needling and requested the Board reverse the rule that allows physical therapists to practice this method of treatment. The AAC argued that physical therapists only perform 46 hours of training to be certified to practice dry needling, while acupuncturists train for almost 2,000 hours. The association claimed this made dry needling by physical therapists an “unsafe practice of acupuncture” (4). However, this statement is strongly misleading due to the additional 3,400 hours of doctorate level schooling that physical therapists already have behind them before they complete those 46 hours specific to dry needling training. Physical therapists spend three years in graduate school learning how the human body works, what can go wrong with it, and how to fix it within the realm of physical therapy. Additionally, doctors of physical therapy are required to take continuing education courses throughout their careers.

Additionally, the AAC made the claim that dry needling is just a misnomer for acupuncture, while the two are fundamentally different practices. They may look similar to the untrained recipient, but physical therapists and acupuncturists perform their respective treatments with fundamental ideological differences between the two. This is not to say that one is better than the other, and patients may make the informed autonomous decision to receive either or both treatments. However, as the Denver District Court decided, there is no need to prevent members of one profession from performing treatments all together. In December 2017, the court recognized that physical therapists are acting within the Colorado Physical Therapy Practice Act when they perform dry needling.

As the Colorado Chapter of the APTA President Cameron MacDonald put so eloquently,

“this legal debate was brought forth by those who wished to restrict the practice of another profession from their own. This debate could have been about any intervention utilized by physical therapists, and not just dry needling. It is imperative to consider this legal challenge and the lawsuits brought against the Colorado PT Board through the lens of the Colorado consumer of healthcare. Consumers in Colorado are provided access to health care providers which have a defined scope of practice under which to deliver patient care. Health care professionals are expected to provide the best care they can, and to practice under a scope flexible enough to both protect the consumer and not limit the development of practice by health care providers.”

When physical therapists perform dry needling, they are practicing within their professional scope. When acupuncturists perform acupuncture, they are practicing within their professional scope. Both professions can live harmoniously alongside each other while helping patients within their respective realms.

Why does any of this matter? First, any judicial ruling or legislative rule concerning a profession as a whole likely has implications that affect many of its members. In this case, physical therapists that perform dry needling in Colorado were in danger of losing their legal right to treat patients in this way. Further, patients were in danger of losing out on a treatment that can benefit them. To be effective health care providers, it is imperative that physical therapists are informed practitioners in order to best advocate for their profession and best treat their patients. Denying to inform themselves and take positive action does a disservice to future physical therapists and patients who will benefit from the work done to advance the profession today. In order to practice as autonomous providers, physical therapists must continue to advocate for their profession and understand the issues surrounding it. It also stands to reason that since the American Physical Therapy Association participated in this case as an amicus party and presented information that no doubt helped sway the case, physical therapists should support and be members of the organization that advocates for them on this broad level.

This debate is not in Colorado alone; lawsuits in three states have gone the opposite way and the state boards have been forced to remove dry needling provisions from their practice acts.4 Since each state has their own physical therapy act, it is important that the Colorado practice act, which will be revised next year, continues to maintain its inclusive language that provides “for new developments in physical therapy practice, which includes dry needling” (Caplan and Earnest, LLC, personal communication, January 9, 2018). For the good of physical therapists, patients, and the future of physical therapy as a profession, this particular case is closed.


If you are a student physical therapist, like myself, who hopes to perform dry needling as a professional one day or if you simply would like to learn more about its practice, please refer to the references below.

  1. Dry Needling by a Physical Therapist: What You Should Know. American Physical Therapy Association. http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/dry-needling-by-physical-therapist-what-you-should. Published December 25, 2017. Accessed January 28, 2018.
  2. Gattie E, Cleland JA, Snodgrass S. The Effectiveness of Trigger Point Dry Needling for Musculoskeletal Conditions by Physical Therapists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2017;:1-41.
  3. Miller J. Physio Works – Physiotherapy Brisbane. Acupuncture and Dry Needling. https://physioworks.com.au/treatments-1/acupuncture-and-dry-needling. Accessed January 28, 2018.
  4. Migoya D. Acupuncturists sue Colorado’s physical therapy board over the very definition of their craft. The Denver Post. https://www.denverpost.com/2017/04/05/acupuncturists-sue-board/. Published April 7, 2017. Accessed January 28, 2018.

So You’re Interviewing for PT School (and more specifically for REGIS!)…

Name: Erin Lemberger

Undergrad: University of Northern Colorado

Hometown: Littleton, CO

Fun Fact: I sing the national anthem at sporting events!

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It’s almost that time…interviews! I can’t wait to meet this year’s prospective students, and I know everyone else in our Regis DPT community is excited as well.

Those in the midst of or about to interview, I know this is a stressful and exciting time. Just a year ago, I remember the butterflies I was feeling, along with anxiety and anticipation. To start, take a deep breath, trust yourself, and know that this is the fun part. This is the time to find the program that is the right fit for you. You’ve worked hard preparing for this, so remember to take the time to enjoy it too. The more relaxed you are, the more you will be the best version of yourself on interview day.

Kelsie, the Class of 2019 admissions representative, received some questions about the interview process from prospective students last year. Carol, the Class of 2018 admissions representative, and her have shared some answers to these questions that you may be wondering about as well. I hope this helps assuage any concerns you may have!

Q: Should I bring anything to the interview (pen, portfolio, resume, notepad, etc.)?

A: No need to bring anything. You will receive a folder and pen, information about Regis, and a water bottle. Of course, you’re welcome to bring your own paper and pen, but there’s no need. Some people like having a notepad to jot down questions for the faculty or interesting things they learned throughout the day, but it is completely your own preference. Also, keep in mind, you will be carrying whatever you bring around campus during the campus tour.

Q: Are there any questions that stumped you or caught you off guard? What types of interview questions should I expect?

A: Interviews are now done in a group format, so not only will you have the opportunity to answer questions, you’ll be hearing and responding to what others have said. It really feels like the interviewers are sparking a conversation with each question. They want this discussion to be natural and give you the opportunity to be yourself. I really mean it when I say to be yourself as much as you can be. Regis is unique in the fact that they really look for people’s character during the interview, rather than solely admitting students for grades and GRE scores. When the faculty asks you questions, they are not seeking a right or wrong answer. They are seeking to learn who YOU are and how you communicate. With the group interview format, there is opportunity to listen and engage with the faculty as well as the other prospective students, so take advantage of these moments.

Q: How can I prepare for the interview?

A: Some advice is to look at the Regis website and see where the values of Regis fit into your life and how you can express that during interviews. Faculty biographies are good information to look at prior to interviews, and reviewing this information can give you an idea of questions you might want to ask faculty members. If you do feel stumped at any point, don’t be afraid to take a minute to gather your thoughts because they appreciate that more than a made-up answer. It also helped me to look up some common physical therapy school/traditional interview questions and brainstorm answers. Think about what you have experienced already and have those stories ready. If you have some solid examples of your experiences, you’ll be able to adapt to wherever the conversation goes. Finally, make sure you research the topics you’ve been given ahead of time so you can prepare and get your thoughts together. Another piece of advice is to perform a practice interview with friends or family members in a group setting. Practice speaking out loud and ensuring you are speaking clearly and loud enough as they ask you different interview questions.

Q: Is there a chance to meet current students?

A: YES! You will have multiple opportunities to interact with various students throughout your day. Also, from 4:30-6:30pm on both interview days, we will have a meet-and-greet off campus for prospective students to meet with current students. I hope to see you all there! That being said, this is by no means mandatory and your attendance will not affect your admission to the program.

Q: What should I expect from the group interview format?

A: The group interview will consist of two faculty members and three candidates. It is not designed to be all three of you taking turns answering one question at a time nor each of you competing to have the best answer; instead, it is designed to be more of a fluid, facilitated discussion of specific topics among everyone.

Q: What will the whole day be like?

A: Everyone will go through 5 different “stations,” so to speak. They include the interview, campus tour, student Q&A panel, a skills lab observation in one of our classes, and an anatomy lab presentation. They won’t necessarily be in that order, but the whole interview day will include all stations and conclude with lunch. You’ll also stick with the same student-led tour group between each part of your day, so you’ll have plenty of time to get to know them and ask them questions as they come to mind.

Q: What should I wear?

A: I would err on the side of business formal. Most men typically wear matching pants and jacket, a button-up collared shirt, and a tie. Most women wear slacks or a dress skirt, a blazer, and a blouse. Cropped dress pants would work too, and if dresses are your thing, then go for it. It is really important that you feel comfortable in whatever you end up wearing! That being said, when it comes to shoes, heels are great, but as long as you’re really comfortable in them. Flats are perfectly fine; in fact, if you opt to wear heels, I would bring a pair of flats along with you so you can change into them while you go on your campus tour. Also, be sure to bring a jacket in case it’s cold. There will be a coat rack available to store your belongings while you are inside. Simply remember this is a professional interview, so dressing professionally is highly recommended.

Best of luck, interviewees! Feel free to reach out if you have any more questions. I can be reached via e-mail at elemberger@regis.edu. We are all looking forward to meeting you!

– Erin, Kelsie, and Carol

Finals Week: A Beautiful Struggle

It’s that time of the year again…

No, we’re not talking about the holidays.

It’s Finals Week, the crescendo of each physical therapy (PT) school semester.

If you haven’t experienced a finals week in PT school, then here are a few ideas of what Regis students encounter during this time each semester.

  1. …but first, Practicals Week

Gone are the days of “dead weeks” leading up to final exams. Practical Exam Week is usually the week prior to all of the written final exams. This is where the skills you have acquired over the entire semester are put to the test to see how you are able to apply them in a real-life situation. During the days leading up to these exams, you will often see students crowding into room PCH 409 to practice their skills and drill each other on the specific times to use them. Study sessions can extend late into the night for some students (Pssst…PT school secret: often these practicals require knowing information that will also be on the written final, so it’s like studying for two exams at once…now that’s a deal!)

  1. Review Sessions

It is not uncommon for faculty members to hold review sessions discussing what to expect on the final written exam. These are often a great help in refining study strategies (PT school pearl of wisdom: take advantage of these sessions!)

  1. Finals Week Schedules

Each class takes 4-5 exams the entire week, with one exam per day and each one for 2 hours. You can find last minute study sessions dispersed across Claver Hall in the hours leading up to the exams to review any lingering questions or fill any remaining knowledge gaps. And hey, after one exam is over, students have 22 hours to study for the next test…what an ample amount of time!

  1. Work-Life Balance

In the words of The Great Tom McPoil, “take a day for yourself every week.” This may be hard to remember during these challenging weeks, but still very relevant. Students usually make modifications to Tom’s “day” suggestion during finals week, and instead take a few hours to relax and meditate with various types of exercise (or naps) – whatever takes the mind off studying for a few moments.

  1. The Triumph of Completing a Semester of PT School

At the end of each finals week, you will find students celebrating another semester down and another job well done! It’s a time to look back at the terrific accomplishments with pride and relish in the fact that your hard work got you here

– Courtney Backward

Check out this video of first and second year students studying (and relaxing) for their finals!

 

Video Credit: Janki Patel