Second Year Students Kick off “Toolkit Talks”

“Toolkit Talks” were instigated by second year students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler.

“The three of us were talking during Spring Break and reflecting on the diverse experiences and knowledge that our class has and how much we would love to learn from each other. We learn a lot in class from our professors, but we realized that there is a rich untapped resource of knowledge in our peers. So, we proposed a platform similar to TEDTalks and now we have ToolKit Talks—an opportunity to learn from our peers and add more knowledge to our ever-expanding PT toolkit.” -Emily Cornelius

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2nd Year Students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler:  Creators of “Toolkit Talks” 

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In Tara Dirocco’s session “Chill Out: Meditation to Help Get You Through,” Tara shared her background in yoga and meditation with an incredibly revitalizing “Love and Kindness Meditation.”

Jack Anderson shared inspiring insights from his favorite novel “Legacy” in his session “New Zealand All-Blacks: Using Sports to Learn About Life.”

 

 

Move Forward 5k/10k Race 2019, Featuring a New Course!

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 Are you a runner, walker, or just love dogs (and/or beer)? The Regis University School of Physical Therapy is hosting its 17th iteration of the Move Forward 5k/10k and kids run at Regis University on September 21st, 2019. The race will take place on the Regis University Northwest Denver campus, and we are especially excited this year to unveil a new course that takes participants off campus and onto the beautiful Clear Creek trail headed west. The course for both the 5k and 10k is an out-and-back and starts and finishes in the quad on the Regis University campus. I am an avid runner but will get to experience a race from the other side of things this time as a race director. This race welcomes all ages, levels of fitness, and supports two amazing foundations: The Foundation for Physical Therapy and Canine Companions for Independence

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Our youngest companion in training, Garin

This race is especially important to the school of physical therapy because it is hosted by the students of the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and has been an annual event for 17 years! This race means a lot to our program, and the physical therapy profession as we share our passion for promoting health, involving community, and raising money for Canine Companions for Independence and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. Canine Companions is especially meaningful to Regis, as we have annual teams of students who assist in puppy raising before they are sent to train to become a fully-fledged service dog. The Foundation for Physical Therapy helps support research in physical therapy for our future profession.

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Wether you are a running machine or are looking for a fun casual time we would love for you to join us. Early morning bagels, fruit, and coffee will be provided to give you that pickup before the race! Stick around after the race to enjoy burgers, hot dogs, and last but not least…beer! There will also be yoga, music, vendors, and Canine Companions for Independence dogs to keep you busy! Also remember to bring your kids! This is a family friendly event and the kids run will be a fun event around our beautiful quad area! 

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We are still looking for sponsors–this race is a non-profit and all proceeds go to the aforementioned foundations. If you or you know someone who would like to sponsor this race, the Regis University School of Physical Therapy and our foundations would be extremely grateful! No donation is too small, a little goes a long way! You can find more information or sign up for the race at https://runsignup.com/Race/CO/Denver/MoveForward5K10K . There is also a donation button listed on the website for donations. 

 

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this race, please email our sponsorship team at gdaub@regis.edu or jolden@regis.edu for more information. 

Please join us for this amazing event! Again, the race will be held at Regis University on Saturday, September 21, 2019 starting at 7:30am!

If you have any further questions, please contact me at mlombardo@regis.edu

Hope to see you there! 

~ Mark Lombardo, Class of 2020 Move Forward Representative

 

Regis DPT Students Present: “LGBT+ 101”

 

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Taylor Tso, Hannah Clark, Felix Hill (left to right)

Regis University first-year DPT students Felix Hill, Hannah Clark, and Taylor Tso recently held a session for their classmates entitled “LGBT+ 101 for Student Physical Therapists.” The presentation covered foundational terminology and concepts related to LGBTQIA+ communities, a brief overview of LGBT+ healthcare disparities, as well as tips for making clinical spaces more inclusive. Here are some thoughts from the presenters related to key foundational concepts, what motivated them to present on this topic, and what their plans are to expand on this work in the future:

What does LGBTQIA+ stand for?

LGBTQIA+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual.

 

What is the difference between gender and sex?

Both sex and gender exist on spectrums. A person’s sex is assigned to them at birth based on their genitalia, typically as either male or female. Intersex people are born with a unique combination of sex traits such as hormones, internal sex organs, and chromosomes. Gender involves a complex relationship between our bodies (think biology and societally determined physical masculine and/or feminine attributes), identities (think inherent internal experience), and expressions (think fashion and mannerisms). While gender is commonly thought of as a binary system (men and women, boys and girls), there are people whose identities do not fall within either of these categories exclusively, or even at all. While many people identify with the gender often attributed to the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), there are others who do not share this experience (transgender).

 

Does gender identity have anything to do with sexual orientation?

No! You cannot make assumptions concerning someone’s sexual orientation based on the way they express their gender or based on their gender identity. Sexual orientation simply has to do with whom someone is sexually attracted to or not. It also has nothing to do with how sexually active someone is!

 

Why did you feel it was important to present on this topics?

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 “In spite of our community’s unique healthcare needs and the stark disparities that affect LGBT+ people’s access to healthcare, typical DPT programs offer little to no education that would prepare you to treat LGBT+ patients. We wanted our cohort to be competent and confident in treating this population.” –Felix

“Felix recognized this need at Regis early on and has been working closely with our faculty to develop more inclusive and comprehensive educational materials. As an ally, I have been honored to work with Felix and other members of PT Proud (the first APTA recognized LGBT+ advocacy group) in this process of educating ourselves and others. I believe that the field of physical therapy can do a better job of caring for LGBT+ patients and I want to be a part of the solution.” –Hannah

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What do you believe was the main impact of this presentation?

 “Facilitating educational exposure to LGBT+ topics that people may or may not have had knowledge of before. This presentation sparks curiosity and lays down a baseline understanding for healthcare professionals to better their communication, and thus, quality of care for their LGBT+ patients.” –Taylor

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So you have given this presentation—now what?

 This was just the beginning! Due to negative past experiences and fear of discrimination, many LGBT+ people will go to extremes to delay care. Even if someone has access to health insurance and can afford to come see a PT, which many do not, people are likely to wait until their condition is very serious, which then contributes to poorer outcomes.

We will work to share our knowledge widely throughout the U.S., starting with a presentation at CU in August. But ultimately, workshops are not enough! As board members of PT Proud, the LGBT+ catalyst group in the HPA section of the APTA, we want to ensure that physical therapy professionals across the country receive a basic level of LGBT+ competency training, which will ultimately require changes to DPT and PTA curricula. We will also be working with PT Proud’s Equity task force to influence laws and policies to increase LGBT+ healthcare access.

Felix, Hannah, and Taylor all look forward to the prospect of future presentations.

 

How can I learn more?

Follow PT Proud on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

Feel free to leave a comment on this post with any questions or thoughts as well!

7 Reasons You Should Take a Gap Year Before PT School

Name: Courtney Hardin, Class of 2018
Undergrad: Washington State University (GO COUGS)
Hometown: Spokane, WA
Fun Fact: I’m obsessed with my dog.

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If you’re currently reading this blog asking yourself, “Is it a good time to go to school right now? Should I take a year off before I apply? Should I even take 2?” Well, this blog is for you! I took a year off before going to PT school, and it was the best decision I could have made for my soul and–of course–for my professional career.

Here are 7 reasons why taking a year off could be the right choice for you:

1. Make Sure PT is the Right Career Choice

I didn’t have enough experience with multiple disciplines of PT, so I volunteered at an inpatient rehab facility for a few months and got a job as an outpatient PT aide. I ended up getting a lot of experience and gained a passion for PT that I didn’t have in my undergraduate pursuits.

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Halloween at the clinic

2. Polish Your Application

I needed to bump up my GPA a little before applying. So, I ended up retaking a couple of the core classes at a local college (anatomy and physiology… #amiright). Whether you need more hours in the clinic or that pre-req grade, taking a year off will help you be the best applicant possible!

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Taking some time to reflect in Peru during my year off

3. Explore

I’d always wanted to travel abroad in undergrad, so I decided to backpack through South America. I went to Peru and hiked the Inca trail to Machu Picchu, then to a ski mountain in Chile, I toured the Wineries of rural Mendoza, cruised through Argentina by bicycle, explored the city of Buenos Aires, and hiked through Iguazu Falls. This trip changed my life and my viewpoint in so many indescribable ways. So, before you enter graduate school and a full-time PT gig, take the time to explore the world now!

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Machu Picchu!

4. Be There for Family and Friends

I wanted to spend some time with my family before heading off to grad school because hey—my family is pretty rad! If you’re considering PT school, sometimes taking a year to visit home, reconnect with friends, and get some quality family time in is key before you sign up for 3 grueling years of work.

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5. Give Your Brain a Break

I needed a break from the school books. I wanted to enjoy a good book (of my choosing), take time to run a few races, and live a bit more “stress-free” before embarking on the next school adventure. Regardless of if you take a year off or not, you will eventually get burned out in PT school from all the studying with no breaks. Many of my classmates agree that taking a year (or more!) before PT school helped delay that burnout onset.

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6. Do Some Things for YOU, not for your Application

I needed some relaxation time up at the lake cabin. If you take a year off, don’t spend every second on your PT application: have FUN!

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7. Grow as a Person

At the end of the day, I simply needed to just be me for a year.  Taking a year off doesn’t mean you’re putting your life on hold; it means that you get a whole year to find out more about yourself and fine tune what you want in life.

Without taking that time off, I wouldn’t have done all the necessary things to improve my application, my confidence, my PT experience, and—of course—my life experience. There is no specific time you have to apply! Schools don’t look at how much time you take off between undergrad and applications; they look at the person you are when you apply. And hey, if you’re ready to apply now, go for it—I know plenty of people who did that, too.  Bottom line: do what’s best for you, not what’s best for everyone else!

If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at chardin@regis.edu.

Regis DPT Family

What Did the Class of 2019 do Over Summer Break?

Name: Kassidy Stecklein, Class of 2019
Undergrad: Kansas State University, KS
Hometown: Hays, KS
Fun Fact: I really, really enjoy tornado weather.

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Mission trips, senior trips, and retreats, oh my! (I’m from Kansas, I just had to 🙂 ) As roughly a quarter of our class journeyed through Utah, people constantly asked us why we were all together.  When we explained to them that we were simply classmates on our week off from PT school, they were thoroughly impressed that such a large group of grad students would all like each other enough to travel together. However, anyone who currently goes or went to Regis would tell you this doesn’t shock them one bit: PT school at Regis isn’t just an education—it’s also a family.

When deciding on where I wanted to go for PT school, I knew I wanted somewhere where I would not only get an incredible education, but also get a place that I could make new memories at and feel like I was at home for the next 3 years. Regis has not only provided that, but so much more. Thinking back on the first 2 semesters of school, my initial thoughts don’t go to the countless hours spent in Claver Hall drawing the different pathways of the brain or that familiar smell of the cadaver lab; they go to the numerous adventures spent with my classmates.

During the transition from the spring to summer semesters of our first year, we were given a wonderful a weeklong break. Now, the initial thought might be to spend that week prepping for the upcoming semester or catching up on the sleep missed during those last few weeks of finals…but this was not the case with our class. Our class is always up for new adventures and spending our time to the fullest.

We all love living in this beautiful state of Colorado, but since we were given a week off, why not adventure out a little farther? About 25 of my classmates and I traveled to Zion National Park in southern Utah to make some irreplaceable memories. We packed our cars to the max (and I mean every last inch) with our sleeping bags, tents, and backpacks, and we were ready to embark on our 10-hour road trip. Lucky for us, PT school teaches you how to spend 40+ hours a week with the same group of people, so 10 hours went by like a breeze!
The first stop on our adventure was Cedar City, Utah. We used this as our last little pit stop before heading all the way to Zion the next day. Despite the forecast for storms and rain, we lucked out and were able to find an awesome campsite where we all relaxed together by the fire and began to take in the beauty we would be blessed with over the next few days.

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The start of many dinners by the fire.

Starting off on our 2nd day, we only had about an hour or so drive to our final destination outside of Zion, but our first hike of the trip happened to be on the way. Our 1st hike was Kanarra Falls, which was a perfect hike for us to start off the week. Not too long of a hike, Kanarra Falls was great for getting us back into the hiking routine. It also provided a bit of an introduction to getting comfortable with hiking through water. Traveling through slot canyons, this hike consisted of many waterfalls; it even ended with a waterfall that we could go down like a slide! After the hike, we finished our road trip outside of Zion National Park.

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Our group in the middle of the slot canyons at Kanarra Falls

 

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Climbing inside the slot canyons of Kanarra Falls

When they say teamwork makes the dream work, they weren’t kidding! This was our motto for day 3, as the trek to get to Zion was an adventure in itself. We knew the roads were expected to be a little “rough,” but that was a complete understatement. Regis is great at developing leaders and team players in the PT field, and I’d say these traits were tapped into as we worked together to get Wyatt’s Subaru down the mountain in one piece. We had people picking up and moving rocks, walking beside the car to make sure it didn’t go over the edge, and I’m pretty sure at one point we were all about to pick the car up and just try to carry it down the mountain. In the end, though, we all successfully got down; this forever remains one of the best memories. We also hiked Hidden Canyon Trail that day and saw the incredibleness that is Zion for the first time.

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Everyone got out of their cars and moved rocks to get Wyatt’s Subaru safely down the mountain!

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Hiking up Hidden Canyon

Day 4 brought about one of the hikes we had all been waiting for: The Subway. Being one of Zion’s more popular hikes, there was plenty of information to tell us to start early in the morning (typically an 8-hour hike) and avoid it when the weather is rough. We like a challenge, so (of course) we slept in and waited until afternoon to start—all while having the prediction of inclement weather and possibly flash floods. Despite the circumstances, we successfully completed this 10-mile hike through the water in a little over 4 hours, and even made it back in time to return our gear that day (the workers at the store didn’t believe that we could successfully finish it that quickly, but obviously they don’t know the determination of Regis PT students). If you ever go to Zion, this hike is a MUST: you end at a series of pools that you can swim through to make it to the final waterfall destination.

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Trekking through the Subway

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Alex leading the way through the freezing pools at the end of the Subway

Day 5 was sort of our recovery day. We had our biggest hike of the trip planned for Friday, so in preparation we did a nice short hike at the Emerald Pools. We finished the day by finding our own waterfall pool to go swim at Toquerville Falls. The road to Toquerville Falls was another adventure in itself; but once again, we like a challenge, so despite advice to turn around and people telling us our cars wouldn’t make it, we defied the odds and were able to enjoy the day!

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Toquerville Falls

Day 6 was our big finale: the 18-mile hike up the West Rim to Angel’s Landing. At this point, everyone was a little beaten up, whether it was blisters, muscle soreness, or just mentally fatigued. Either way, we were determined to complete this last hike together. There is a much shorter hike up the Angel’s Landing (5 miles roundtrip), but if PT school taught us anything, it’s that the reward is so much better when you’ve worked your tail off for it. This was by far the hardest and longest hike, but if you ask any of my classmates, it was 110% worth it.

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All of us at the top of Angel’s Landing!

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Soaking in the view after 19 miles of hiking         

If coming to Regis for PT school has taught me anything, it’s that experiences, relationships, and memories are just as important as the education you receive throughout these 3 years. As much fun as the late night study sessions and practical preparations are, it is the memories made between the class times that I will cherish forever.

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If you don’t have shorts and socks tan lines, did you really hike 18 miles?

How to Avoid Burnout in PT School

 

Name: Brad Fenter, Class of 2019
Undergrad: University of Texas at Tyler, TX
Hometown: Vernon, TX
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Burnout is an interesting thing, mainly because it only happens with things that we love. No one gets burned out on things we hate or even things we just feel a little “meh” about. The concept that we no longer want to be around or indulge in something we love is very unsettling . No one has ever gotten burned out on onions; no one loves onions. We tolerate them and can even enjoy them, but love them? No. And if you’re thinking to yourself, “I love onions!” Then you’re most likely an alien trying—unsuccessfully—to assimilate with human society.

No, burnout is only possible with something we love. For me, I love Clif Bars—specifically the white chocolate macadamia flavor. If you think another flavor is better, that’s completely fine. Just know I’ll be judging you until the end of time. Unfortunately for me and my love of Clif Bars, I went on a backpacking trip a few years ago with an entire case in tow. Every day I crammed those delicious little bars in my face until, one day, I just couldn’t eat them anymore. I wanted to eat them, but I just could not do it. I was burned out.

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My sadness is palpable.

After the trip, I had just one bar left and it has stayed in my pack as a sad, dilapidated reminder of what once was. I want you to learn from my mistakes and avoid burnout. Since this is a PT blog, here are 3 ways to ensure your time in PT school does not become a macadamia Clif Bar.

1. Pace Yourself

This is most important for when you’re first starting out in PT school. That first semester you tell yourself you’re going to read all the textbooks, watch all the online videos, and take excellent notes. If you do everything at top gear, you’ll be out of gas by October. Then what will you do? There are approximately…all of the semesters left at this point. Instead, take the time to learn good study habits and you won’t have to worry when you feel a little fatigued halfway through a semester.

When we discuss long commitments, the analogy of a marathon is always used: “Remember it’s a marathon, not a sprint!” When I ran my marathon, though, it took only part of 1 day and I was finished by noon. To contrast, PT school is 8 semesters—which is around 3 years—which equates to…A lot of days. A better saying would be, “Remember it’s a 3-year commitment.” It may seem long right now, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s not a long time. If you start with the right pacing in mind, then you will be better off. Do not be the brightest star for the first month only to flame out spectacularly for the next 32 months.

Had I paced myself a little better, Clif Bars and I would still be going steady and I would have my first love second love. My wife, of course, is my first love (as the bruise on my ribs proves after writing that previous sentence).

2. Get Involved (but not too much)

This point may seem to run counter to my previous one, but it will all make sense in the end (just like neuroscience except for the sense-making part). There are many opportunities to get involved with things outside of the main curriculum. You can run for a position as class officer, you can be a part of the puppy program, you can join a student interest group. You can go to conferences (quite handy since some of them are required, anyways) and get to know practicing PTs. All of these things are important. Getting involved in more than just schoolwork can remind you of why you started PT school in the first place.

The way I stay involved with my classmates is through Ultimate Frisbee. If there’s a pickup game going on after class, I’m there. I get to interact and stay engaged with my classmates outside of the lab or lecture hall; it’s great. I enjoy the exercise, competition, and group aspect of the whole thing. But all of those other things I listed before? I do exactly NONE of those things because I’m antisocial and don’t like new situations. Now, that may sound like the ramblings of an angry old man who wasn’t hugged enough as a child, but it is actually a larger part of my point. I have time to play a pick-up game of Ultimate Frisbee and enjoy a drink at the brewery afterwards. I don’t have time to attend the fellowship meeting after class, play frisbee, participate in the puppy program, volunteer to pass out flyers at commencement, and also do well on my finals.

You may be thinking, “I can do all of those things and still be successful!”

Is it possible to do? From a strictly physical standpoint, sure. If you want to end up like this:

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The point is not that all of these things are impossible. But, you will be drained by the end of each semester—just in time for finals.

3. Keep Perspective

This is, I believe, the most important point. I put it last to weed out the unworthy people who get scared of words milling about in groupings of greater than 140 characters. Now that they are gone, we can discuss the most important tool we possess to avoid burnout.

Perspective goes both directions in time. It’s important to remember the future we are working towards as practicing clinicians, but it is also important to see where we came from. If I were not in PT school I would still be plugging away at my old job with little satisfaction and a feeling that there is something more I could be doing. Anytime I feel a little down on myself, I think about how stressed I was beforehand; this serves as great motivation for the present. If you’re one of those young folks and have not had a previous career, then your perspective should be forward. Most people in life will never have the opportunity to work in such a fulfilling field as physical therapy or even get into PT school! When we zoom out from our studies, case assignments, skill checks, and lab practicals, we can see just how great we really have things.

You may be thinking, “I know this is important! But how do I actually accomplish this?” My most important tool for keeping perspective is to prioritize time for myself. Whenever a day is available, I will try to get outside and hike. Or bike. Or camp. Really, anything outside will do. Even when it’s just a weekend and there are exams on Monday, I will take a long bike ride to a coffee shop to study. That way I get to study with the addition of sunshine and exercise thrown in. If you hate all of these things for some unfathomable reason, there’s still hope for you. Maybe you like going to the movies or reading books. That’s great. Make time to do those things because if you do, you will be more successful.

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Making time for myself on a hike to Handies Park

 

For me, outdoor activities allow me to see the wider world and keep perspective on how insignificant many of the major stressors in my life really are. Regis’ DPT program is very good at pushing you to the edge and then pulling back just in time. But what happens when you feel like you’re going over the edge? What happens when you feel you’re on the road to burnout? Do you have the tools to pull back from the bleary-eyed, emotionally drained abyss? If you can pace yourself and get involved (but not too much) and keep perspective, you will be better equipped to avoid burnout. Remember, life doesn’t get easier once we are done with school, but this experience will prepare us to handle the difficulties that come our way.

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Here’s me, fellow student David Cummins, and more friends after tackling another one of life’s difficulties

 

April Recap: 3rd Annual Talent Show

April is one of the busiest months for PT students! Whether it’s your first or last year, it’s a time of studying, planning your future, and–of course–a time to get to know your classmates even better.

First and Second Years:

Somehow, between all of the practicals, midterms and class, our first and second years had time to come together for the 3rd Annual Talent Show! It was a refreshing reminder that we’re more than just students: we all have other talents and interests that keep us fresh and focused in the classroom.  There was both a performance and visual arts competition; prizes included gift cards to REI (we are in Colorado, of course!) and tickets for a whitewater rafting trip, to a TEDx weekend, and to Cirque du Soleil!

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Special thanks to:

Organizers: Kimi Bengochea and Michael Young

MC: Michael Young

Team: Lydia Hamstra, Brianna Henggeler, Ashley King, and Rachel Maass

Funding: Dave Law, the Director of Student Activities

Watch the talent show in its entirety online! 

Part 1 * Part 2Part 3 * Part 4 * Part 5 *

Third Years: 

The third years wrapped up their LAST clinical rotation, most took the NPTE (fingers crossed!), and now they are presenting their capstone and research presentations before graduation next weekend. Congrats, almost grads!

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Some third years (and other SPTs and PTs) finishing off their 3-month clinical with their advisor, Shelene Thomas (left)

Blogger: Carol Passarelli

Meet Maggie McKenna: Why Regis?

Name: Maggie McKenna, Class of 2019
Undergrad: University of Dayton
Hometown: LaGrange, IL
Fun Fact: I’ve been skydiving twice!

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Deciding where to go for a Doctor of Physical Therapy education is a big, life-changing decision…but also a very exciting one! Unlike some of my classmates, I didn’t know exactly what I was looking for at first, so my decision process took time. In the end, though, it was Regis that caught my heart and it hasn’t let go since.

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Service Learning!

Here are a few (of many) noteworthy reasons I ultimately chose Regis:

The faculty: I remember being very impressed with the faculty on my interview day, and my admiration for them has only grown in my short time here. All are experts in their specific fields of study, in addition to being involved in many leadership positions throughout the APTA. Most notably, our professors know us as individuals and treat us as equals. They respect and listen to our insights, questions, and concerns and do their best to support us any way possible.

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On top of Breckenridge Mountain with classmates

Colorado: I am from and went to undergrad in the Midwest (Go Flyers!), and was ready for a change of place…and altitude! I traded in the gray, flat, windy Midwest (still love you, home) for three years of sunny days, mountain views, and powder-filled weekends. I was drawn to the mountains and the breathtaking playground it offers.  And when I do miss city life, downtown Denver is just a ten-minute drive away. There is something for everyone here in Colorado! I’ve been here six months and there is still so much more to see and explore—mountains and city alike!

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On top of Mt. Bierstadt!

Jesuit Values: Catholic education is very important to me (17 years and counting!), but by no means do you have to be Catholic or religious to attend Regis. I was drawn to the Catholic education and values that Regis and the Jesuit community stand for because they are ones I hope to embody both as a physical therapist and in life. Through our professors, peers, and curriculum we are encouraged to exemplify these values by caring for the whole person, providing service locally, nationally, and globally, as well as being leaders in our field, practicing with integrity, and collaborating with other professionals.

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Hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park on a weekend

Regis was and is the right place for me; I absolutely love it! I chose the place that would help me be the best version of myself, and encourage you all to do the same with your exciting decision ahead. We at Regis are hopeful it will lead you here!

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Sky Pond, RMNP

What is the First Year of DPT School Like?

Name: Meg Kates, Class of 2019
Hometown: Herscher, IL
Undergrad: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Fun Fact: I was the Spanish Student of the Year at my high school. ¡Me encanta Colorado!
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“I can’t believe you’re actually leaving.”

“I know, but it’s okay. I’ll be home soon.”

I hugged my best friend goodbye underneath a star-dotted sky. They shine brighter in Herscher, Illinois, which is a farming community in the middle of the state where the lights of Chicago are but a faint, pink spot in the northern distance: in fewer words, home. That was the day I packed up everything I owned and moved to Denver to embark on my grand physical therapy school adventure. I look back at that time and consider the expectations I had for Regis University and how they have been exceeded many times over.

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Meg and her classmates at the beginning of their semester

To begin, I knew starting PT school was going to change my life, but I didn’t realize the extent to which it was going to change my mind and how I perceived the world. When Regis students begin the first semester, classes last about eight hours. I think it’s safe to say that none of us were accustomed to such a heavy intellectual load—both in breadth and in depth. At first, I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to keep up with sheer amount of material (i.e. the origin, insertion, action, and innervation of every muscle in the human body). However, Regis students will tell you that a day comes when our passions combine with our teachers’ lessons, and, by the magic of neuroplasticity (to be discussed more second semester), our brains have been primed to absorb information like those ridiculous towels you see on the infomercials. I feel like I learn eighty new things every day, and, even wilder, I have the intellectual capacity to accommodate it all. Regis creates the most competent professionals by challenging its students to elevate their caliber of thinking.

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Participating in the Professional Ceremony at Regis initiates all students into the DPT program.

Even though Regis’ DPT program can be dense, professors are there to ensure that we persevere through the lows, and they celebrate with us during the highs. Never have I been surrounded by such a reputable group of physical therapists and scientists. I would believe that Dr. Cliff Barnes, the anatomist, created the human body himself if I didn’t know any better. I want Dr. Mark Reinking to talk to me about the shoulder forever. I will never fangirl as hard as Tom McPoil makes me fangirl when he explains the biomechanics of the ankle. Beyond their intellect, Regis DPT faculty have made me feel immensely supported in my first semester. Professors are just as eager as students to discuss individual goals, explain difficult concepts, and offer resources to aid in understanding. It has been emphasized to us time and time again that Regis selects students that they believe will succeed in becoming accomplished, holistic practitioners. Their faith in us inspires me to be an excellent—yet humble—student and future physical therapist.

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Meg and some of the Class of 2019 take a study break in the mountains

Yet, the most earth-shattering surprise about PT school is the relationships that I’ve formed with my classmates. I expected to make friends when I moved to Denver; I didn’t expect to be inspired by every interaction I have with one of my peers.  They’re the people with whom I climb both literal and figurative mountains. They challenge me to be a teacher when they cannot find answers, and they shed light when I’m confused. I spend every day with the same eighty-one people and I know they watch over both my academic and spiritual wellbeing, as I do for them.

When I think about going back to Illinois, I cannot wait to show my friends all I’ve learned. When I look to the future, I cannot wait to show the world the physical therapists and human beings my classmates and I will become.

 

Wrapping Up the Fall Semester

Michael Young, second year Regis DPT student, writes in about his shifting perspective on the world of PT and reflections on this past year.  Michael serves as the Vice President for the Class of 2018 and hosts phenomenal game nights.

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Name: Michael Young, Class of 2018
Hometown: Madison, WI
Undergrad: University of Wisconsin, Madison
Fun Fact: When people tell me to put my money where my mouth is, I tell them I already have. I’ve had 16 teeth pulled(some baby, some permanent), braces 3 times, and reconstructive jaw surgery!

As a first year Regis DPT student, life was an anxious blur of due dates, exams, group meetings, and basically doing my best to hold on to the wild ride that we call PT school. As a second year student, I’m sorry to report that PT school is still a blur of due dates, exams, and group meetings. However, I no longer have to hold on quite as tight. I discovered over the last year that I am capable of learning at a graduate level. That knowledge alone takes an incredible amount of stress off my shoulders. However, now that I know I can make it through the struggles of the short-term, I’ve gotten to worrying about my long-term future. The stakes feel higher, and now I’m more concerned with who I will be when this graduate program spits me out into the real world.

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Michael takes a break from school and explores CO

That “real world” of physical therapy is starting to make more sense to me every day. It’s not that I have eureka moments with every lecture or lab; it’s actually the opposite. The amount of information in every lecture is overwhelming, the concepts are more difficult, and the clinical reasoning is not as straight forward. However, this year, I’m not worried about all those things. I understand that I am going to be overwhelmed by information in my classes and what is asked of me, but you know what? I’m going to pass my exams, I’m not going to fail out of school, and I’m going to be a certified PT in a year and a half. The light, however dim, is at the end of the tunnel.

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Michael and Alison got married over the winter break last year!

As a second year student, I don’t worry about school anymore. Instead, I worry about grown-up things. Where will my wife and I live after I graduate? What sort of setting will I practice in, and will it be the right fit for me? If I stay and practice in Denver, will high prices in the housing market and relatively low PT salaries allow me to buy a house while simultaneously paying off student loans? These are the questions that I get to worry about this year. True, I don’t have anatomy exams or human physiology practicals to worry about, but just writing about my newly found grown-up questions makes me anxious.

What else do I know as a 2nd year DPT student? I know that I am about to earn a doctoral degree, which according to the 2012 US census puts me in a category I’ll share with fewer than 2% of all Americans. I also know that there aren’t many better ways to isolate yourself from the general population than by being a student for 25 years of your life. I know that the community members I meet through my upcoming clinical experiences and patients I will treat as a future physical therapist will profoundly change the way I see my community, myself, and my nation. I cannot wait to surround myself with the people I have trained my whole life to treat, yet have met only briefly.

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Michael has had adventures both in school and out of school in the past year.

So here I am: a second year DPT student just realizing that the real world is coming, and I finally get to be a part of it. I am more excited than ever to get back into the clinic to meet a slice of this nation that I have been isolated from over these last years in academia. As I continue to study as a student and learn as a clinician, I hope to grow as a person. And, if the rest of my time at Regis is anything like what I have already experienced, I am confident that I will have success as a physical therapist and success in life.

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Regis DPT gear sale: order before October 30th!

It’s that time of the year: the fall clothing order is here! The Class of 2018 will take orders until October 30th, so now is the time to get your Regis DPT swag.

http://regisdpt.wixsite.com/clothingorder/shop

We have water bottles, wine glasses, hats, shirts and sweaters that will all be emblazoned with the Regis DPT logo upon ordering.  Whether you’re preparing for the winter season or looking for gift ideas, we recommend you check out the list and order before October 30th!

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Move Forward 5K/10K Recap

Move Forward 2016 (September 17, 2016) was a huge success! We had 261 runners signed up for the event and raised over $7,000 for Canine for Companions and The Foundation for Physical Therapy. A sincere thank you to all of our volunteers, runners, and sponsors for making this event amazing.  If you have any questions, suggestions, or would like to be involved in next year’s race please email us at moveforward5k.10k@gmail.com.

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Our beautiful sign made by Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson!

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Fastest Faculty Awards go to Andy and Amy.

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Our service dog Takia, making sure we don’t forget who we are raising money for…

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A few racers/volunteers enjoying some yoga after the race.

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Post-Run Fun!

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Our Couch to 5K team did amazing this year! Next year, maybe a 5K to 10K team?

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No one asked Matt (Class of 2017) to dress up, but that is just how great this man is…

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Class of 2017’s Move Forward Team; great job, everyone! The Class of 2018 has some big shoes to fill…

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We can’t wait for the start of next year’s race!

 

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Ryan Bourdo, co-director of Move Forward, graduated The University of Oregon with B.S. Degrees in Biology and Human Physiology in 2010. Originally thinking of medical school (never mind the fact that medical school rejected him twice), he soon fell in love with physical therapy, thanks to an amazing therapist in Portland, Vince Blaney, MSPT. Vince showed him everything he originally wanted to be as a physician: using anatomy and physiology to help those with injuries. He soon worked as a physical therapist aide for two years and is currently at Regis University completing a Doctor of Physical Therapy. In his free time, Ryan likes to run, hike, and cook. You can find Ryan at www.ryanbourdo.com, or on Twitter @RyanBourdo.

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A Non-Native’s Guide to Colorado’s Summer Playground

Name: Evan Piche, Class of 2018

Hometown: Northampton, MA

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Fun Fact: I once thought I met Danny DeVito in an airport men’s room.

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Congratulations! If you’re reading this, there is a fair chance that you are either (a) my mother, or (b) a member of the incoming Class of 2019. Welcome, and since both parties will be visiting Colorado this summer, I’d like to help get you acquainted with some of the best trails Colorado has to offer. Denver is not, strictly speaking, a mountain town in the same sense as Telluride, Steamboat Springs, and Crested Butte are. We’re kind of out on the plains, straddling two worlds—but that doesn’t mean you’ll be short on options for running, hiking, or biking. We Denverites are fortunate enough to enjoy a wealth of those opportunities for after-school outdoor recreation, and when you have a long weekend and are up for a few hours in the car, the options for adventure are limitless.

With that, I’d like to offer my favorite hiking/trail running and mountain biking destinations in the Denver-metro area and beyond. From backcountry escapes to a quick after-class workout, you’re sure to find something to do this summer. (And, while I was not specifically asked to include this, I would be remiss in my duties if I did not use this opportunity to act as your ambassador to the world of Denver’s breakfast burritos.)

Hiking/Trail Running

School day: when you only have an hour or two after class, these are the places to check out! (15- 20 minutes away)

  • Matthews/Winters – Red Rocks Loop
    • A rolling, rocky 5-7 mile loop with fantastic views of the foothills west of Denver and the world-famous and aptly named Red Rocks Amphitheater.Mathew_Winters

trailrunproject.com/…/matthewswinters-red-rocks-loop

  • Falcon
    • Hands down the best climb in the Denver area, this trail winds its way up four steep technical miles to the summit of Mount Falcon. From here, either retrace your steps to the parking lot nearly 2,000 feet below or continue on to explore a vast trail network.Mt_Falcon.jpg

trailrunproject.com/…/mount-falcon-east-loop

  • Green Mountain, Lakewood
    • A mostly gentle 5-8 mile single track loop featuring the Front Range’s best sunrise and sunset views.Green_Mtn

trailrunproject.com/…/green-mountain-trail

Weekend: about a 90-minute drive from Denver

  • Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park
    • A classic RMNP hike; after meandering around the base of Long’s Peak, the trail turns vertical and ends with a fun scramble to Sky Pond amid boulder fields and some of the Park’s most impressive glaciers.Sky_Pond_RMNP

trailrunproject.com/…ail/7002175/sky-pond

Long Weekend: 3-5 hours from Denver

  • West Maroon Pass, Aspen to Crested Butte
    • This is considered a rite of passage among Colorado hikers and trail runners. While the towns of Crested Butte and Aspen are separated by one hundred miles of highway, this challenging, backcountry trail connects them so that “only” 10 miles sit between them. Pack a bathing suit (or not) for a dip in Conundrum Hot Springs if you plan to do this trip properly.

cascadedesigns.com/…/hiking-west-maroon-pass-from-aspen-to-crested-butte

Mountain Biking

School day:

  • Lair O’ the Bear 
    • Swoopy, flowing lines, grinding climbs, open meadows, and a breathtaking view of Mount Evans—all less than 30 minutes from Denver. After riding, grab a burger or brew in one of Morrison’s quaint eateries.Lair_of_the_bear

mtbproject.com/trail/703097

  • White Ranch 
    • This is a gem of a park and located only a few miles north of Golden; it offers trails that rival anything in Boulder (after all, you can see the iconic Flatirons from the parking lot) with a fraction of the traffic.White_Ranch

mtbproject.com/trail/632917

  • Apex Mountain Park, Enchanted Forest Trail 
    • Apex is one of Denver’s most well-utilized mountain bike trail networks, and with good reason. The Enchanted Forest descent is not to be missed. Be sure to check the link provided for alternate direction riding restrictions on odd/even days before you go. Bonus: these trails are a blast to ride in the snow after the fat bikers, skiers, and snowshoers do all the dirty work of packing down the snow.Apex_EnchantedF_Forest

mtbproject.com/trail/616137

Weekend:

  • Blue Sky to Indian Summer
    • Regardless of whether you mountain bike or hike (or climb, or paddle, or just enjoy beer), a trip to Fort Collins is always enjoyable. Fort Fun is home to one of the Front Range’s finest fast, flowing mountain bike trails. While options abound for long climbs up to the summit of Horsetooth Mountain Park, the Blue Sky Trail sticks to the lowlands, traversing a spectacular cliff line with scenery reminiscent of your favorite Western movie. Also, New Belgium brewery is not to be missed.

mtbproject.com/…/blue-sky-to-indian-summer

Long Weekend:

  • 401 Trail, Crested Butte, CO
    • Come spring and early summer, the wildflowers on this ultra-classic trail grow to be chest-high. Imagine ripping down 14 miles of high country singletrack, with views of snowcapped mountains disappearing and reappearing as you dive into and out of fields of wildflowers so high and dense as to obscure your line of sight. Be sure to grab tacos at Teocalli Tamale once back in town.401_Trail_CB

mtbproject.com/trail/338027

  • Slickrock Trail, Moab Utah
    • Quite possibly the most famous mountain bike trail in the world—and for good reason. Slickrock offers an other-worldly experience: an ocean of red sandstone surrounds you, with views of the Colorado River far below in the canyon. In the distance, the snowcapped La Sal Mountains dwarf the landscape and offer a stunning contrast to the red, pink, and orange hues of the desert. For après ride fun, check out the Moab Brewery, located right in the center of town—it’s an oasis of alcohol and burgers in an otherwise remarkably dry state.Slickrock

mtbproject.com/trail/158941

Burritos

The breakfast burrito was invented in the kitchen of Tia Sophia’s in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1975. Since that historic day, it has been possible to eat a burrito for all 3 (or more) meals of the day, a feat now commonly referred to as a “hat trick.” Like most of Denver, the breakfast burrito is not native to Colorado, but found in our city a welcoming home. I am unsure of whether or not Colorado has an “official” state food, but I would nominate the breakfast burrito for that honor.

With the help of acclaimed writer and Denver resident Brendan Leonard, I have assembled the definitive guide to Denver’s Best Breakfast Burritos:

  • Grand Prize: El Taco de Mexico on Santa Fe
  • First Runner Up: Bocaza on 17th Ave.
  • Second Runner Up: Steve’s Snappin’ Dogs
  • Honorable Mention: Illegal Pete’s
  • People’s Choice: Campfire Burritos (food truck)

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    Evan is an avid biker, trail runner and climber.  We hope you enjoyed his pictures and guide to an adventurous CO summer!

 

Balancing a Relationship with PT School

Being married is the best. I get to do life with my best friend every day, and it was a definite perk that I didn’t have to find a roommate when coming to PT school. For those of you who are starting PT school this fall and are married or in a relationship, here are a few things to think about.

  1. If you’ve gotten this far and are still in a relationship, then your significant other is incredibly supportive of you. Don’t forget to thank him or her! He or she will be your biggest advocate and cheerleader over then next three years. Let them know how much you appreciate their sacrifices so that you can pursue your dream.
  1. Yes, school is tough, and you need to study. A LOT. But make sure that you don’t neglect your relationship. When I interviewed at Regis, my interviewer said to me, “We don’t want to break up marriages.” Your relationship will last far longer than your time in PT school. Do your best in school, but intentionally set time aside to spend with your significant other. They get lonely sitting on the couch quietly watching someone study all the time, so plan on doing fun things and going on dates. There’s a lot to do here in Colorado. Go explore!  Some of our dates have included:
    1. Road trip to Mt. Rushmore (it’s only 5.5 hours away!)IMG_51362. Horseback riding and snow hiking in Estes Park–it’s the entry town to Rocky Mountain National Park (1 hour away)IMG_5263.JPG3.  Hiking in Golden (15 minutes away)IMG_5862 4.  Musical at the Buell (10-15 minutes away)IMG_5634.JPG
  1. Remember that everyone’s relationship is different, and you have to find a balance that works for you. Some of my classmates have significant others who work 8-5 jobs and can have dinner together each night. They usually study during the week and take a day off on the weekends to play. My husband is an ER nurse and works 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., so there are many days that I leave before he wakes up and to bed before he gets home. He works many weekends, so I do lots of homework during the weekend and then take a day off of studying during the week when he has off.  That’s okay. Do what works for you. There is no one correct recipe for success in this program.
  1. Lastly, be patient with your significant other. He or she really likes to be with you, and it will be an adjustment for both of you adapt to PT school. Don’t get discouraged. You will make it!

Overall, is having a relationship hard during PT school? Absolutely. It’s one more thing to think about and invest in with an already filled schedule. However, you will never see your significant other’s support and kindness more than over the next three years. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

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