Hey Class of 2022, Why Regis?

Interviews are right around the corner for prospective Regis DPT students, and current students and faculty could not be more excited to welcome them to our campus. We wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on just a few of the myriad of diverse reasons that our current students chose Regis. Some first-year students reflected on the major choice they made just one year ago. Radiating themes that seem to have drawn the class in include: obvious inclusiveness within the program, a unique emphasis on service to others, seemingly endless opportunities, and adventure in the beautiful state of Colorado. Meet some of our amazing students!

Brittney Galli

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Hey all! My name is Brittney, I am a Colorado native who knew I would miss the mountains WAY too much if I chose to attend grad school in another state. Luckily for me, Regis University offers one of the best DPT programs in the country complete with 3-4 different clinical opportunities, hands-on lab experiences, and a variety of different ways to get more involved in the community.  The core Jesuit values that Regis embodies really emphasize inclusiveness, justice, teamwork, and the importance of making the world a better place: these are all concepts that I hold dear to my heart, so I knew that Regis was exactly where I was meant to be.
I had a wonderful yet somewhat unique experience applying to Regis: I actually applied a total of THREE times before being accepted into the program. Throughout my journey, I had immense support from the admissions office on how to improve my application and set myself apart from other interviewees: with an excellent program comes an extremely competitive pool of applicants, so I kept improving and growing so that one day I would be among those accepted into the program.
All of the hard work and perseverance was COMPLETELY worth it: I am finally a member of the Regis DPT family and I would not want to be anywhere else! This program provides you all the support and tools you will need to succeed in whatever avenue you choose to pursue through a variety of intriguing coursework and a faculty who cares deeply about each and every individual in the program. Every day I am so excited to go to class and learn about how to become the best DPT I can possibly be all while still growing and improving as an individual. And in my spare time I am of course taking in all the beauty that Colorado has to offer.
Arianna Amendariz
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The interview process at Regis was my main drive to pursue my education here. The current students, faculty, and staff were all very welcoming and reassuring as to why we made it as far as we did–we all had the passion and desire to foster a positive difference in the community through physical therapy. The classes and professors continue to fuel that ambition every day.
Lena Parker 
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My name is Lena Parker and I am a first year SPT at Regis. My reason for choosing Regis University to receive my DPT degree is due to their strong value system. The Jesuit values of Regis University include cura personalis, doing more for others, and embracing a holistic approach. I had interviews at other schools that did not have an organized value system, and it absolutely made Regis stand out.
I was concerned at first because I am not a Jesuit, nor  have I ever practiced the Catholic faith. I was born and raised as a Shinnyo Buddhist. However, as I learned more about the Jesuit values, I found that they are broad and universal. Despite using language such as “God”, I could still deeply relate to and apply the Jesuit ideals. Another concern of mine was that the values were a facade and were not actually practiced by faculty and staff. During my first semester, I was relieved to see that the faculty regularly support the Jesuit values, without preaching them. I always feel supported physically and emotionally by the faculty. They emphasize community service as much as possible. We are always reflecting on our experiences to ensure that we as students can support ourselves, and therefore support our future patients.
Regis University is very accepting of people of all denominations, faiths, or lack of faith. I believe that these values are providing me with a unique and wholesome experience and shows that the school is not just trying to produce more robotic physical therapists. Regis truly cares about its students, and I am extremely glad that I chose this school to pursue my career goals.
Peter Lee 
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Regis stood out to me in my choices of DPT programs because I felt like Regis actively wanted me to be a part of their program. The general lack of responsiveness from programs during the application process can be discouraging, but Regis obviously placed value on their prospective students.
As an immigrant who came from a place that received assistance from all around the World in times of need, global health is important to me. I hope to one day be a patient-centered therapist who empowers diverse communities. Regis’s Global Health Pathway allows me to practice and serve with a global perspective; it played a big role in my decision to enroll.
Suzanne Peters
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I am an incredibly indecisive person. Therefore, I am thankful that Regis stood out so far above the other schools I was applying to, making this major life decision so easy. The highlights for me during my interview process included the abundance of opportunities and the personable attitudes of the students and staff on interview day and throughout my admissions process.
Opportunities at Regis include, but are by no means limited to, service learning, the Global Health Pathway, and many student government roles. Last year, I felt like I could see myself being apart of this intricate network of roles and growing opportunities. A year later, it has become a reality and I am so thankful! Anyone who is excited to be challenged and grow as a person, student, and a future clinician should pursue Regis.
Additionally, my personality meshed well with Regis students almost immediately both at interview day and a year later when I stepped into Claver Hall for the first time as an official student. The attitude here is friendly, helpful, and upbeat. I have found that the way the current students and staff interacted with us on interview day was direct and genuine, which to me is extremely important and reflective of the character here. Both the staff and students are true to themselves.
Lastly, you cannot beat this location! I am from the Midwest and have loved my move to Denver. It is so great to get out to the mountains every weekend and recharge. There are many new hobbies to explore here and there always seems to be a classmate who is an expert and is ready to help you learn. That’s why Regis!
@regis_dpt

Second Year Students Kick off “Toolkit Talks”

“Toolkit Talks” were instigated by second year students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler.

“The three of us were talking during Spring Break and reflecting on the diverse experiences and knowledge that our class has and how much we would love to learn from each other. We learn a lot in class from our professors, but we realized that there is a rich untapped resource of knowledge in our peers. So, we proposed a platform similar to TEDTalks and now we have ToolKit Talks—an opportunity to learn from our peers and add more knowledge to our ever-expanding PT toolkit.” -Emily Cornelius

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2nd Year Students Tara Dirocco, Emily Cornelius, & Syd Knadler:  Creators of “Toolkit Talks” 

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In Tara Dirocco’s session “Chill Out: Meditation to Help Get You Through,” Tara shared her background in yoga and meditation with an incredibly revitalizing “Love and Kindness Meditation.”

Jack Anderson shared inspiring insights from his favorite novel “Legacy” in his session “New Zealand All-Blacks: Using Sports to Learn About Life.”

 

 

Regis DPT Students Present: “LGBT+ 101”

 

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Taylor Tso, Hannah Clark, Felix Hill (left to right)

Regis University first-year DPT students Felix Hill, Hannah Clark, and Taylor Tso recently held a session for their classmates entitled “LGBT+ 101 for Student Physical Therapists.” The presentation covered foundational terminology and concepts related to LGBTQIA+ communities, a brief overview of LGBT+ healthcare disparities, as well as tips for making clinical spaces more inclusive. Here are some thoughts from the presenters related to key foundational concepts, what motivated them to present on this topic, and what their plans are to expand on this work in the future:

What does LGBTQIA+ stand for?

LGBTQIA+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning, Intersex, and Asexual.

 

What is the difference between gender and sex?

Both sex and gender exist on spectrums. A person’s sex is assigned to them at birth based on their genitalia, typically as either male or female. Intersex people are born with a unique combination of sex traits such as hormones, internal sex organs, and chromosomes. Gender involves a complex relationship between our bodies (think biology and societally determined physical masculine and/or feminine attributes), identities (think inherent internal experience), and expressions (think fashion and mannerisms). While gender is commonly thought of as a binary system (men and women, boys and girls), there are people whose identities do not fall within either of these categories exclusively, or even at all. While many people identify with the gender often attributed to the sex they were assigned at birth (cisgender), there are others who do not share this experience (transgender).

 

Does gender identity have anything to do with sexual orientation?

No! You cannot make assumptions concerning someone’s sexual orientation based on the way they express their gender or based on their gender identity. Sexual orientation simply has to do with whom someone is sexually attracted to or not. It also has nothing to do with how sexually active someone is!

 

Why did you feel it was important to present on this topics?

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 “In spite of our community’s unique healthcare needs and the stark disparities that affect LGBT+ people’s access to healthcare, typical DPT programs offer little to no education that would prepare you to treat LGBT+ patients. We wanted our cohort to be competent and confident in treating this population.” –Felix

“Felix recognized this need at Regis early on and has been working closely with our faculty to develop more inclusive and comprehensive educational materials. As an ally, I have been honored to work with Felix and other members of PT Proud (the first APTA recognized LGBT+ advocacy group) in this process of educating ourselves and others. I believe that the field of physical therapy can do a better job of caring for LGBT+ patients and I want to be a part of the solution.” –Hannah

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What do you believe was the main impact of this presentation?

 “Facilitating educational exposure to LGBT+ topics that people may or may not have had knowledge of before. This presentation sparks curiosity and lays down a baseline understanding for healthcare professionals to better their communication, and thus, quality of care for their LGBT+ patients.” –Taylor

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So you have given this presentation—now what?

 This was just the beginning! Due to negative past experiences and fear of discrimination, many LGBT+ people will go to extremes to delay care. Even if someone has access to health insurance and can afford to come see a PT, which many do not, people are likely to wait until their condition is very serious, which then contributes to poorer outcomes.

We will work to share our knowledge widely throughout the U.S., starting with a presentation at CU in August. But ultimately, workshops are not enough! As board members of PT Proud, the LGBT+ catalyst group in the HPA section of the APTA, we want to ensure that physical therapy professionals across the country receive a basic level of LGBT+ competency training, which will ultimately require changes to DPT and PTA curricula. We will also be working with PT Proud’s Equity task force to influence laws and policies to increase LGBT+ healthcare access.

Felix, Hannah, and Taylor all look forward to the prospect of future presentations.

 

How can I learn more?

Follow PT Proud on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/PTProud/

Feel free to leave a comment on this post with any questions or thoughts as well!

Managing Your Posture in PT School

Name: Joshua Holland

Undergrad: Idaho State University

Hometown: Centennial, Colorado

Fun fact: Before PT school, I worked at a BBQ restaurant in Missoula, MT called Notorious P.I.G.

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Last week, I was editing my Biomechanics skills video when I noticed a curly-haired DPT student in my video with fairly poor posture. I was far from excited when I realized that student was me. I knew my posture wasn’t the greatest after years of asymmetrical shoulder position from college pole vaulting and poor lifting mechanics, but I had no idea it was THAT bad! My shoulders were protracted with my head in a significantly forward position. My initial thought was, “man, I am about to be a PT soon…how am I going to teach posture when my own posture is so poor?!”

An average day for PT students involves a heavy dose of lectures, studying, and an even heavier dose of sitting. Often a PT student may be seated in lectures for 8 hours a day. By the end of the day, professors may start to notice students performing many combinations of wiggling, shifting, and slouching, with many students standing up in the back of the class.

The field of physical therapy involves movement for rehabilitation and we often hear, “exercise is good!” However, within school, sometimes we neglect our own movement in order to remain studious. The intention of this blog post is to initiate the thought of posture and provide some quick exercises that DPT students can use throughout their day. As future clinicians, we are role models to many of our patients, so it is important that we recognize our own posture and work to preserve good body mechanics within ourselves in order to have long-lasting careers and fully help our patients.

I couldn’t sleep after seeing my poor posture! So, I set out the next day to find ways to correct and maintain posture and decided to share them with you all. In this blog post, I interviewed Dr. Alice Davis, an expert on the spine, and fellow first year DPT student, Sarah Spivey, a certified pilates instructor since 2007, to provide some tricks on improving posture!

 

Question and Answer Interview with Dr. Alice Davis

Q: Often our posture is poor in class, we tend to slump over to write down our notes, what are some cues we can use in class to correct this?

A: Make sure your feet are flat on the floor and use the back of the chair to support you. You are becoming kinesthetically aware of your body in space as PT students, so try to be aware of the weight on your ischial tuberosities as you sit. Try to make each ischial tuberosity level. The overuse of repetitive poor posture is what creates problems over time, so start to realize your body position while you sit in class.

Q: While we sit in class it feels like we roll our shoulders forward and lean forward to pay closer attention or write on our devices, what are some cues to get those shoulders back with a neutral head?

A: Because you are sitting at computers for most of the days, you tend to have some upper cervical extension and increased flexion in the lower cervical spine. Imagine there is a rope going straight through your head and down to your seat, try to make that rope as straight as possible. A quick exercise you can do in class is move your shoulders up an inch, back an inch, and down an inch, then hold this for ten seconds, and relax. Try to do 10 reps for 10 seconds of this exercise.

Q: For the anatomy nerds out there, what are some of the muscles that are affected by this forward leaning posture/slumped position?

A: The upper cervical spine is extended in this forward posture position. Suboccipitals are a major component in this and often called the headache muscles because it can result in cervicogenic headache. A cervicogenic headache is when the pain begins in the back of the neck first before it goes up to the skull. This can be posture and stress related. Other muscles that play into extensor moment of the upper-cervical spine are the splenius and semispinalis muscles.

Q: Is there any other tips and tricks we can use in the classroom and out of the classroom to help with posture?

A:  

  • Foam rollers are great! You can put the foam roller vertically along your spine with the head and sacrum supported. Using your arms, do some snow angels for pectoralis major and minor.
  • If you are feeling uncomfortable and wiggly, your body is telling you to move – get up and move around.
  • Do something during lunch time. Eating is important, but try not to study if you don’t have to. Give 30 minutes during lunch for your body and mind.
  • Breathing is important. Moving the body and getting the diaphragm to move through breathing helps those muscles that support the thorax. Watch your breathing pattern, especially when you are stressed. Try to do some slow inhales and exhales.
  • Try a simple nodding of your head, as if you’re saying yes. This lengthens the longus colli and capitis muscles that can help with postural support. You can even do this when you’re driving! Rest your occiput on the headrest and perform a little nod. Try to hold the nod for 10 seconds with 10 repetitions.

 

Here are some techniques and exercises for managing posture in graduate school (or any career environment!) brought to you by our very own DPT first year, Sarah Spivey!

 

Sit on deflated Gertie ball.

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This will allow you to sit up on your ischial tuberosities (IT) to encourage a more natural lordotic curve while also eliminating the pressure on the ITs. By sitting on a relatively unstable surface you will also increase the use of your postural stabilizers. Try to incorporate five minutes per hour of sitting.

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Another technique is to use the Gertie ball between your lumbar spine and your chair. Find your ideal posture by allowing yourself to slump in your chair. Now, move into a full anterior tilt of your pelvis until you feel pressure in your lower back. Now, ease off until you feel the pressure disappear. Scoot back toward the back of your chair and place the ball at the level of the lumbar spine. The ball will help you maintain your neutral posture during sitting.

Head nods/nose circles on Gertie ball.

Lie in supine on a firm surface. Bend your knees and place your feet at the distance of your ASIS. Allow your sacrum to feel heavy and equally distributed on the floor/mat. Take a few breaths and notice if you have excessive space between your thoracic spine and the floor. If so, on an exhale, allow your t-spine to sink toward the floor. This should limit any rib flare. Place a 1/3 – ½ inflated Gertie ball (or folded towel) under your head. You should feel pressure evenly distributed near your occipital protuberance – this will insure you are lengthening your cervical extensors (especially for those of use with a forward head!). Take a few breaths and allow your head to feel heavy on the ball. Imagine a one-inch line on the ceiling and slowly trace this line down with your nose. Return to your starting position making sure to avoid moving into extension. Repeat this 8-10 times. Now draw slow circles with your nose around your one-inch line. Keep your circles small and controlled. Perform 6-8 in each direction.

Wall sit pelvic curls.

While sitting in class, if you start to feel your low back tighten up, try this stretch! Stand against a wall with your feet about 12 inches in front of the wall and hip distance apart. Try to feel contact of your sacrum, rib cage and the back of your head on the wall. You should have a very small space between your lumbar spine and the wall. As you exhale, draw your abdominals in and curl your pubic bone up toward your nose. You should feel your lumbar spine flatter against the wall. As you inhale, slowly allow your ischial tuberosities to widen until you are back in a neutral position. Repeat 10-12 times.

 Seated neck stretch – sitting on hand.

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Feeling tension in your neck during class? Scoot forward so your back is away from the chair and sit tall on your ischial tuberosities. Imagine lengthening your cervical spine and then gently tuck your chin toward your chest. Try not to flex your cervical spine! Now allow one ear to fall toward your shoulder. You should feel a stretch on the opposite side. If you would like to increase your stretch, you can sit on the hand of the side you are stretching. For example, if you are feeling the stretch on the right side, sit on your right hand. This will bring your shoulder down and away from your ear.

 

Overall, I hope  this post helped you become more aware of how important it is that we practice good posture while in school, or with any lifestyle! Do you have favorite exercises or tips to remind you to practice posture? Feel free to share with us in a comment below!

Finals Week: A Beautiful Struggle

It’s that time of the year again…

No, we’re not talking about the holidays.

It’s Finals Week, the crescendo of each physical therapy (PT) school semester.

If you haven’t experienced a finals week in PT school, then here are a few ideas of what Regis students encounter during this time each semester.

  1. …but first, Practicals Week

Gone are the days of “dead weeks” leading up to final exams. Practical Exam Week is usually the week prior to all of the written final exams. This is where the skills you have acquired over the entire semester are put to the test to see how you are able to apply them in a real-life situation. During the days leading up to these exams, you will often see students crowding into room PCH 409 to practice their skills and drill each other on the specific times to use them. Study sessions can extend late into the night for some students (Pssst…PT school secret: often these practicals require knowing information that will also be on the written final, so it’s like studying for two exams at once…now that’s a deal!)

  1. Review Sessions

It is not uncommon for faculty members to hold review sessions discussing what to expect on the final written exam. These are often a great help in refining study strategies (PT school pearl of wisdom: take advantage of these sessions!)

  1. Finals Week Schedules

Each class takes 4-5 exams the entire week, with one exam per day and each one for 2 hours. You can find last minute study sessions dispersed across Claver Hall in the hours leading up to the exams to review any lingering questions or fill any remaining knowledge gaps. And hey, after one exam is over, students have 22 hours to study for the next test…what an ample amount of time!

  1. Work-Life Balance

In the words of The Great Tom McPoil, “take a day for yourself every week.” This may be hard to remember during these challenging weeks, but still very relevant. Students usually make modifications to Tom’s “day” suggestion during finals week, and instead take a few hours to relax and meditate with various types of exercise (or naps) – whatever takes the mind off studying for a few moments.

  1. The Triumph of Completing a Semester of PT School

At the end of each finals week, you will find students celebrating another semester down and another job well done! It’s a time to look back at the terrific accomplishments with pride and relish in the fact that your hard work got you here

– Courtney Backward

Check out this video of first and second year students studying (and relaxing) for their finals!

 

Video Credit: Janki Patel

 

Student Spotlight: What is the Orthopedic Student Special Interest Group?

Name: Zach Taillie, Class of 2018
Undergrad:
State University of New York at Cortland
Hometown:
Phoenix, NY
Fun Fact:
I put BBQ sauce on everything.

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Hello!  My name is Zach and I am a third year in the program. I am also the President of the Orthopedic Student Special Interest Group (sSIG) here at Regis. In the orthopedic section we focus on manual therapy and musculoskeletal-related ailments.

When I heard about the opportunity to run for president, I knew it was a perfect fit for me.  Let’s back up a little bit to figure out why.  At the age of 15, I got hooked on weightlifting and loved working out.  In addition to that, I also grew up playing baseball, basketball, and football. I first found out about physical therapy during college after sustaining a serious dislocation of my left shoulder that resulted in a SLAP tear (if you don’t know what that is, you should apply to PT school!).  Guess that’s what I get for wrestling bears. Fast forward to the rehab I underwent after the surgery: I instantly fell in love with the mix of rehabilitation and working out.  That love has continued throughout PT school and drove me to run for the president position.  The election was a dead heat but, when the dust settled, I received 100% of the votes.  How, you might ask?  Maybe I ran unopposed, maybe I ran an awesome campaign, we’ll never really know.

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After taking over the group in the summer of 2016 I decided to adopt a new model.  Every month I reached out to an expert in our field and asked them to do a presentation for the group.  Some of the presentations from physical therapists we had this past year include:

  • Tim Noteboom: How to filter social media to find information relevant to you and who to follow
  • Chris Edmundson: Longevity as a manual therapist: How to save your hands and body
  • Stephanie Pascoe: Residency vs. Fellowship: What’s the difference and is it for me?
  • Lauren Hinrichs: Management of the wheelchair athlete: How do we keep the shoulders healthy in a wheelchair athlete?
  • Steve Short: Denver Nuggets team PT: Management of the professional athlete population

Bringing these presenters in was a lot of fun and allowed me to meet experts in a variety of fields. Given the opportunity, I would do it all the again!

Moving forward, the group has been passed down to the Class of 2019 and I look forward to hearing what they do while we are out on our final clinical rotations.  Stayed tuned on 2 more presentations coming from the Class of 2018, though!  There are also some big things coming to you soon from me and another 3rd year. Be sure to check the Regis Facebook group for an exciting update around the middle of August.  If you have any questions about orthopedic physical therapy, you can email me at ztaillie@regis.edu.

What to Do When You Get Into PT School

 Name: Davis Ngo, Class of 2020!
Undergrad: 
University of California, San Diego
Hometown: 
San Jose, CA
Fun Fact:
My favorite animals are manatees because they’re just the chillest.11071038_10204929466588479_4501112845883243502_o.jpg

You’ve gotten into PT school! Now What?

This is it. You’ve done it. You were accepted into Regis University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program.

It makes sense you got into a few of your other top schools as well (who knew having choices could be so stressful?!). But now you’ve done the research, toured campuses, spoke to all pertinent parties, and finally you’ve come to your decision. A bit anticlimactic, don’t you think? The countless hours of hard work, stress, and uncertainty that lead up this pivotal moment…Funny that the culmination of all this—and the decision that would shape the course of your next 3 years (not to mention the rest of your life)—could come down to just a couple of mouse clicks.

Click.

Click.

Deep breath. What next?

Step 1: Take a moment.

There is no elaborate display, no grandiose announcement, no surprise party.

Just those tiny triumphant mouse clicks (and a hefty hole in your bank account from the deposit).

Anticlimactic? Perhaps. Fitting? Definitely.

You are the reason you’ve gotten this far. You are the one who accomplished all of this. YOU did this—it only makes sense that you get to experience this minuscule moment— all on your own.

You’ve been accepted by one of the finest DPT programs in the nation, and with your click-click of intent you’ve officially committed yourself to a fulfilling and rewarding life of service and learning in the field of physical therapy. The veil of uncertainty cast over your future has been lifted and you know exactly where you’re going to be. Take a moment to think back at all you’ve accomplished: anticlimax aside, this surely was no small feat.

You are intelligent. You are well-rounded. You are hard-working. You are determined and resilient and strong. You are exceptional. You are kind.

This is your moment. You deserve this.

Step 2: TREAT. YO. SELF.

After you’re done patting yourself on the back, here comes the time we’ve all been waiting for… In the immortal words of Tom Haverford, TREAT YOSELF!

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Take yourself shopping. Buy yourself a drink. Go on your favorite adventure. Eat your favorite meal. Take yourself to a movie. Sit in and binge watch your favorite show and, when you’ve finished that, binge watch another. Spend time with your loved ones. Have them shower you with compliments. Buy that thing you’ve always wanted to buy. Do the thing you’ve always wanted to do. Have that cake, and eat it too. At this point you might be thinking: do I really NEED all that? The answer is TREAT YOSELF. YOU ARE AMAZING.

How did I treat myself? One of the first things I did was go on the Patagucci website and buy myself an overpriced, super gaudy fleece. I call it my “treat myself” sweater, and I love it.

After that, I took some time to travel the East Coast (I had never been). I ate, drank, and danced my way around the major cities there, and experienced my first “real” winter ever. It was awful, and beautiful, and just the grandest adventure.

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Brooklyn Bridge!

I came home and decided that I wanted to spend the months before school doing the things I love most: mainly climbing, adventuring, traveling, and being with my loved ones. I put in my two weeks notice at the physical therapy clinic and hit the road.

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Soaking up the sunshine in the Mammoth, CA hot springs.

In the weeks that followed, I spent much of my time climbing and soaking up the Eastern Sierra sun in my favorite place on Earth: Bishop, California. I even got to met up with fellow DPT Class of 2020 student, Annie Govig, and took her on an adventure out in the mountains!

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Met up with Annie Govig on her spring break road trip!

I was lucky to be able to save my money while living at home so that I could take this time off. I also specifically planned to work hard during the application period so I could play hard. If you don’t have this luxury of time, I still hope you find a way to treat yoself. It only takes a few seconds to buy yourself a treat yoself sweater. That cake is just a trip to the store away. Treat. Yo. Self.

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Step 3: Back to business.

Alright, alright. We knew it couldn’t all just be fun and games. You’ve got business to attend to.

By now, you should’ve received an email (or several) from Regis Compliance with detailed information on your list of compliance tasks (shots and immunizations, background check, CPR requirement, etc). These things are important and must be done or in progress before your start date, so get started early! Don’t worry, you’ll have plenty of time as long as you stay on top of it.

This is also a good time to think about your financial situation and figure out how you’ll be paying for your time at Regis. Look into applying for financial aid, research loan options, calculate your budget and cost of living, etc. It’s best to stay well-informed and have some sort of budget in mind before jumping into the world of grad school loans; start thinking and planning now!

Finally, it might be a good time to start thinking about your upcoming living situation. Do you want roommates, or do you like having your own space? Where in Denver do you want to live? For those coming from out-of-state, the process of finding proper accommodations remotely may be daunting and difficult, so try to get started early to get your bearings.

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Step 4: Freak out…But only a little!

“Wait, but I’ve never lived outside of California before. What will it be like to leave my home and my comfort zone? Wait, where are my immunization records? A CPR class costs how much? Do I REALLY need a new laptop and iPad? Holy moly how much money am I going to have to borrow? I haven’t been in school full time for years; am I even ready for this? Where am I going to live? How do I find a place close to school that is also nice that is also cheap and also has great roommates? Oh my goodness; there are only six weeks left before I leave. What about all the things I wanted to do? Who will I be able to see before I leave? How will I get all this done in time? Am I just going to live out of my car? Will I even have friends? AHHHHHHHH!”

It’s okay! Cálmate! Tranquilo! Take a deep breath! It’s okay to freak out a little. Lots of big changes are about to happen and it’s natural to be anxious. Try not to stress too much, though. I know it all may seem a bit overwhelming, but try and take things as they come.

Get things done slowly, one thing at a time. Remember that you now have a whole new support system at your disposal. The counselors and administrators at Regis University are there to help you, so don’t hesitate to call or email with any questions you may have. You also have a whole list of classmates, entering and current, who are eager to help so reach out to them as well! You are not alone in this.

You’ll be okay. I promise.

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Step 5: Breathe, relax, and GET PSYCHED!

You’re about to begin a rigorous academic journey that will eventually lead you to the rest of your career in physical therapy. Soon you’ll be in school full time, five days a week—not to mention the hours spent practicing and studying outside of class and lab.

So, be kind to yourself. This is your time to relax. To breathe. To fully enjoy the calm and the free time you have before becoming a full time graduate student.

Go soak in the sweet sunshine of your last summer. Go play hard and be joyous. Spend quality time with your family and friends. Daydream about the future. Think of all the beautiful and wonderful new opportunities and possibilities that lie ahead. Connect with your new classmates. Be happy for yourself. Get psyched.

This is the beginning of the rest of your life. 

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