How to pick the right PT school: Meet Madeleine Sutton

Name: Madeleine Sutton

Hometown: Seattle, WA

Undergrad: Seattle University

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Last year was my year of uncertainty. I had no idea where I would be going, I had no idea if I would get into school, and I had no back up plan. I was a 20-year-old girl finishing up her undergrad degree at a small university in Seattle and applying to schools on my own. Just getting to the application process was a miracle. Due to some unfortunate circumstances, I had no adviser at my undergraduate university to help me with the complicated process. I felt incredibly lost in all the paperwork and application forms. I spent a lot of time crying, if we’re being honest.

I applied to 5 schools in 5 different states. All of them felt like they could be the right choice, but I had no idea. All of them were far away from home and my entire family. The decision was enormous: I had countless spreadsheets and pro/con lists, and yet I was no closer to making a decision than when I first sent in my applications. You want tissues? I had boxes. But, who cared? It was a big deal? I wanted mooooooore. (See that Little Mermaid joke? Yeah, I went there.) It wasn’t until I went on interviews that I really started to be able to eliminate schools.

I could get all cheesy and tell you that I knew from the moment I stepped on Regis’ campus I knew it was the right place, but that’s not the total truth. I was impressed with the faculty, the campus, and the current students. The problem was that I was impressed with other schools, too. Making a decision still felt impossible.

It wasn’t until a few weeks later–when I was down to two schools to decide between–that I came closer to making a decision. I thought back to my interview days. When I went to the other school to interview, it felt like they were letting me peek in on a super-secret club. When I went to Regis, I felt like I was visiting a group of people that wanted me there. I felt like the people I saw at Regis were part of a community, not just a class. In the end, that was it. My decision was easy when it came down to a secret club versus a community. I’ll take a community any day.

My first semester at PT school was a blur of anxiety and knowledge, but I never felt alone. The second year class became our mentors: they held a get-to-know-you picnic before school started for us to meet each other and them. Our faculty checked in on us frequently just to ask how we were doing and to say hi. We have class parties and dressed up as a class for Halloween. School wasn’t easy–and I felt overwhelmed a lot–but there was always someone there to comfort me. You are never alone in the Regis family.

In August, I packed my entire life into my car and I drove 1000 miles to find my new home. I love the concept of the word “home.” So many songs have lyrics like “take me home,” or “I’ll be your home.” It means so much more than just a place where you live: it’s peace, comfort, and a feeling of safety with people who love and care for you. It’s where everything falls into place…It’s home. Regis is home.

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Madeleine and some other first years with Takia, our service puppy

How to train for Boston and survive PT school: Meet Lauren Hill

Name: Lauren Hill, Class of 2017

Hometown: Flat Rock, MI

Undergrad: Saginaw Valley State University

Fun fact: Never wears matching socks…ever.

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They’ll tell you PT school is a marathon…not a sprint.

I apparently took that a bit too literally.

I’ve run two marathons and two half-marathons since starting PT school; that’s over 2500 miles of training and racing.

Let me back up a bit:

I’m Lauren. Born and raised in Michigan. I went to Saginaw Valley State University for undergrad and double majored in Exercise Science and Psychology. That, for me, was where running really started. I walked on to our cross country/track teams back in 2008 and was—for lack of a better adjective—terrible. I’m not sure why they let me stick around…maybe for entertainment…or to make everyone else feel faster?  Well, after some frank talks with myself and a few good friends, things started to come together. I went from the track equivalent of the “12th man” to placing in the conference, nationally, and eventually becoming a two-time All-American. When I graduated, I felt lost: the last five years had been dedicated to my teammates, mileage and chasing All-American accolades.

So there I stood: two bachelor degrees in hand, PT school applications underway and no longer a delineated reason to run.  I realized I needed a new challenge.

New Goal: Run the Boston Marathon 

Why not? 

I qualified and planned to run Boston in 2015…which happened to be the week before finals of my second semester at Regis.

 Training for the Boston Marathon (or any marathon for that matter) is not a particularly easy task.  Now, add to that 40+ hours of class per week, 10 hours commuting, a significant other, 2-4 hours studying per day (and way more on weekends) and trying to get an adequate amount of sleep… As you can imagine, life got got incredibly busy very quickly. 

A typical day looked a lot like this:

6:15 Wake up, Breakfast

7-8 Commute to Regis

8-12 Lectures

12-1 Lunch break—Run 3-6 miles

1-4 Labs

4-5 Commute

5-??? Run #2–Anywhere from 3-10 more miles depending on the day, Dinner, Study ‘til bedtime

11 Bed

You learn a lot about BALANCE when training for a marathon. You also learn to say “no” to a lot of extracurricular activities:

“ Do you want to grab a beer after class?”

No, I can’t, I have to run.

Do you want to go to the mountains this weekend?”

No, I can’t, I have a long run.

“ Do you want to want to hang out tonight?”

No, I can’t, I have to get up early tomorrow and run. 

My goal for Boston was sub-2:50—an arbitrary time that I let consume me for those 16 weeks (and beyond, if we are being honest). On the outside, I had fun with training, but inside I put an overwhelming amount of pressure on myself to reach that mark.

I failed.

 3:01.

Regardless of the weather conditions, (34 degrees, head wind, pouring rain and Hypothermia by the end)….I was pissed.

I had failed.

But, after months of reflecting (and even while writing this), I have begun to see the race and the months of training as a chapter in life with a lot of little lessons learned (some the hard way).

I do my best thinking when I run, and over time have created what I call My Truths—These are things I realized about myself, running, PT school and life. Take them for what you will. This list will inevitably change, as I do, but it’s a framework that works for me today.  These 13 truths won’t change your life, but I hope you may relate or take something from at least one of them.

Lauren’s 13 Truths

  1. If it doesn’t make you happy, re-evaluate your decisions.
  2. Just because it makes everyone else happy doesn’t mean it’s for you.
  3. Places/destinations are always there…family is not.
  4. What’s monitored is managed.
  5. Be realistic with your goals. Rome wasn’t built in a day.
  6. Morning workouts make for a more productive day.
  7. Fix problems at their root; don’t just put a Band-Aid on it.
  8. Hope is an excuse for doing nothing” – Coach Ed
  9. No matter how much you plan, there are some things you can’t control.
  10. Who you were has shaped you, but to be who you will become you must accept change.
  11. Don’t go or plan to do anything when hungry.
  12. If it’s supposed to be fun but feels like a job, you need a break.
  13. …..coffee first.

I do plan on running Boston in 2017. It seems only appropriate to finish at Regis the same way it began, only this time, I hope to bring a clearer perspective on running, life and happiness. 

Happy Strides!

– Lauren

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Candidates take interviews by a storm

Literally and figuratively.

The candidates have finished their interviews in typical Denver fashion: 60 degrees and sunny on Friday and, naturally, 30 degrees with an impending storm on Monday.

With campus closing early on Monday, the admissions team and faculty worked hard to try to get all of the candidates a thorough and holistic view of the program while also having to shorten the interview day.  The candidates were wonderful in their flexibility due to the weather!

As a first year student, this weekend brought back a lot of memories from a year ago, when I was in the decision-making process for schools.  The incredibly high caliber of student I got to interact with over this weekend reminded me largely of why I chose Regis: this programs attracts future PTs that will care for the entire person and are passionate about service and learning.  Similarly, hearing the faculty introduce themselves and discuss their passions with the candidates reminded me that, although we may call the faculty by their first names and be close with them, they are leaders on a national stage.

I think that having current students so involved in the admissions weekend accurately reflects what this program encourages: community involvement, leadership, and teaching are all essential elements to becoming a good clinician.  It was a lot of fun having the candidates in lab with us!

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To all of the candidates, best of luck!  This is an uncertain time for all of you, and I can relate to how you are feeling.  Know that the current students at Regis are here to answer any questions you may have, and we will be posting about different people’s admission experiences and decisions in the coming weeks.

Please feel free to reach out to Lindsay or myself (we are the 1st and 2nd year admissions reps. Hi.) with any thoughts/questions/concerns you may have!

 

Blogger: Carol Passarelli

 

On the interview weekend: Meet Michael Young

Michael Young

Hometown: Madison, WI

Undergrad: University of Wisconsin, Madison

Fun fact: I visited 16 states in 30 days during an epic summer road trip.

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During the summer of 2014, I found myself in Denver, five hours early for a flight. It was a picturesque day: 82 degrees in the afternoon sun and even more comfortable in the shade. I saw a sign for Regis University and recognized the name as one with a PT program, so I took the nearest exit and walked around campus for the afternoon.  After wandering around the classrooms and watching part of a lacrosse practice, I felt like this was a place I could see myself spending the next three years.

Six months and many applications later, I was back at Regis—this time for an interview. I woke up early on the day and did some yoga in the room of my Airbnb. That’s not my normal routine, but I wanted to do everything in my power to calm my nerves. That morning, yoga took me to my happy place. I put on my suit, threw on my coat and started my three-block walk to campus.

This time on campus, it was cold. After living in Texas for five years, January in Denver made me remember my roots in Madison.  I had made the dangerous 6AM decision to skip my morning coffee; would I lapse into caffeine withdrawal and spend the day with a pounding headache? Or, maybe, would my pumping adrenaline take the place of that necessary stimulant? I worried about it for the next seven hours. It’s funny what really makes you nervous on interview day.

Looking back, I now realize that the interview was the easiest part of the day for me. As soon as I sat down with my interviewer, I knew that Regis was different from the other schools. My interview was a conversation about my past experiences and current hobbies in lieu of the usual discussion of GPA, prerequisite record and knowledge of the PT field. They didn’t ask why a political science major was interested in PT school; they told me how important it was to have people with diverse backgrounds integrated into the profession. They made me feel like my personality and individualism mattered.

The next 24 hours was an emotional roller coaster of second-guessing interview responses, dreaming of an aggressive interviewer who compared me to a chiropractor (gasp!) and an overwhelming feeling of relief and gratitude for the amazing day I had at Regis. As I sat at the Denver airport waiting for my 6AM outbound flight, I started daydreaming about coming back as an actual student. Regis was the school for me and I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else. When I got the acceptance email, I knew my life would never be the same. Now, six months into school, I haven’t been proven wrong.

Best of luck with your interviews, candidates! I hope you feel as at home as I did.

PT School: No longer a pain in the neck

Sitting, studying, stress:  we’ve all felt tense around the shoulders and neck before.  First years, in particular, would attest to some serious cramping after so many hours of studying first semester.

Luckily, one of our second semester classes focuses on the biomechanics of the spine.  And, with that, we get to learn how to test ligaments and facilitate movement between spinal segments.

In our lab yesterday, we focused on the lower cervical spine and were trying to incorporate concepts of biomechanics with learning how to work gently and professionally with other people’s necks.

Although we had to understand the proper movement of each vertebrae, I think the most important take-away from this first exposure was learning how to be comfortable and confident when handling someone else’s head.  I think we all enjoyed taking turns getting different segments of our neck isolated; it felt like a massage after all that sitting!

Blogger: Carol Passarelli