Flat Stanley Goes to Clinical

Name: Nicole Darragh, Class of 2017

Hometown: Columbus, OH

Undergrad: Regis University

Fun Fact: I think kale is totally overrated.

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The Class of 2017 recently returned from their second clinical rotations with a plethora of new knowledge and stories to share.  Some students even had a visitor along the way: Flat Stanley.  Flat Stanley is a small paper figurine that keeps students connected outside of the classroom.  Students take a photo of Flat Stanley completing an activity, learning a new technique, or going to a cool new location, and share those photos with their classmates through social media.  This helped us learn a little bit about each rotation, and keep in touch with our classmates.

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Pictured: Sarah Campbell ’17 with Flat Stanley on her first day of clinical (PC: Sarah Campbell)

Flat Stanley traveled to a wide variety of locations across the country including California, Wyoming, Kentucky, and even Alaska!  Along the way, Flat Stanley learned new documentation systems, new techniques in the clinics, and went on a lot of hikes.  Really, what Flat Stanley is trying to tell you is that while you’re on your clinical rotation, don’t forget to take the time to explore your new surroundings!

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Flat Stanley reviews Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) while at clinic in Chico, CA (PC: Adam Engelsgjerd)

 

Clinical rotations work in a variety of ways.  The first is the lottery option; students choose ten clinical sites from a large list compiled by the clinical education faculty, and rank them in order from 1-10.  Once the lottery is generated, students are placed at a site.  The second is the first come, first serve option; students can choose a site before the lottery begins that they are particularly interested in, and request to be placed at that site before it is taken.  The third is the set-up option: students are allowed to contact a clinical site that is not affiliated with Regis and set up a clinical rotation with them if they are interested.  When rotations get closer, you’ll learn more specifics about how they work, requirements, etc.

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Flat Stanley’s meet up at Devil’s Tower outside of Gillette, WY (PC: Amanda Morrow)

 

Throughout the clinical process, it is important to know that you might not always end up in Denver, and you’ll have to try something new!  Wherever you do end up, make sure to enjoy your free time.  Clinical can sometimes be very overwhelming, and it is crucial to take time for yourself, whether that be exploring your new surroundings, trying a local restaurant, or binging on Netflix.  And if the thought of being gone for six, eight, or twelve weeks scares you a little, all of us will tell you that the time flies by so quickly.  There isn’t much time to be bored!

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Flat Stanley goes sandboarding in the Great Sand Dunes National Park in southern Colorado (PC: Lauren Hill)

 

If you have any further questions about clinical rotations–or other places Flat Stanley and/or students traveled–please feel free to contact me at darra608@regis.edu!  Also, I would recommend reading the post below called “Class of 2017 DPT Student Lindsay Mayors Reflects on Her Clinical Rotation.” (https://regisdpt.org/2016/05/27/class-of-2017-dpt-student-lindsay-mayors-reflects-on-her-clinical-rotation/)

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Flat Stanley helps out with some end-of-the-day documentation (PC: Amy Medlock)

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Flat Stanley enjoying a nice Moscow Mule after a long week at clinical (PC: Amy Medlock)

 

 

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Flat Stanley joins Lauren Hill and Jenna Carlson to run the Bolder Boulder race (PC: Lauren Hill)

Cover PC: David Cummins, Class of 2019

 

What is it like to be in the military and PT school?

Name: Zach Taillie, Class of 2018

Hometown: Phoenix, NY

Undergrad: SUNY Cortland

Fun Fact: I’ve been in the Air Force for 6 years.
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You may not believe this, but NASCAR Technical Institute is a bit of a dead-end school.  You read that right—there is a school completely dedicated to folks who want to learn about race car maintenance and occasionally take them for a spin.  It is a one-year program outside Charlotte, NC, and was what I thought I wanted to do.  While the program set me up for an awesome career as a tire technician at Sears Auto while living out of my parents’ basement, I decided I wanted more out . I found myself over at the Air National Guard office, and in December of 2009, I enlisted.

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Once I was done with my training and learned that I could get school payed for while serving in the military, I was stoked to get started. Little did I know that when it comes to school and military duty, school usually doesn’t win. The biggest mission we undertake in the Air National Guard is state-level disaster response.  My first emergency response was to a winter storm, and to my surprise, I was told by my supervisor that school takes a backseat to duty.  I remember feeling frustrated at the situation, but once I showed up I realized how much of a positive impact we could have.  The feeling of helping out and giving back to those who needed it far outweighed any disappointment at missing classes or balancing class all day with working at night.  Luckily, I was blessed with great professors who would email me notes and allow me to reschedule tests if necessary.  This understanding and flexibility allowed me to respond whenever the call went out, and it allowed me to still excel in school.

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The military hasn’t been all rough, though.  During one of my winter breaks, I was sent to Germany for training.  I spent Christmas in Kaiserslauten, New Years in Berlin, and my birthday in Amsterdam.  Even when I wasn’t out exploring Europe, I was able to have fun at work coordinating air drops (think Humvees and supplies hopping out of planes) with the 86th Airlift Wing.  I’ve had the opportunity to deploy to the Middle East and serve with coalition troops from all over the world and make some lifelong friends.  Oh, and having part of school paid for is another perk!

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Although I originally thought I wanted to make a career of the military as an officer once I graduated from college, I stumbled upon physical therapy during my junior year and fell in love.  Due to a shoulder injury, I was able to experience what it was like to go from injured back to working out and wanted to give that gift to others.  Fast-forward a couple of years, and here I am: at Regis fulfilling me dream!  Currently, I serve with the 153rd Airlift Wing up in Cheyenne, Wyoming.  I go up once a month and spend at least half of my breaks working.  Luckily, my drill schedule and our finals week seem to always coincide…so I get the opportunity to test how long I can stay awake and study.  Two semesters down, and I’m still here!!  While I listen to my classmates plan super rad trips for our summer break, I’m looking forward to two weeks of work connected by a drill weekend.  All things considered, though, I would do all the same given another chance.  I work with some great people and get to do things for my job that most people only see in movies: riding on C-130s, running through live shoot houses, firing some pretty awesome weapons, and watching live gun runs from planes overhead.  The military/civilian balance can be a challenge at times, but it’s one that’s well worth it!

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If you have any questions about balancing school with the military, please feel free to contact me at ztaillie@regis.edu.

How to Have Fun in PT School

Name: Connor Longacre, Class of 2018

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Hometown: Wyomissing, PA

Fun Fact: I am a huge of soccer, though I haven’t formally played since I was 11.

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“It’s fun to have fun but you have to know how.” (Dr. Seuss, DPT)

Many of you reading this may think of the classroom as a no-nonsense place of learning. Those who distract others with joking and laughter are often unwelcome in such environments.

Hear me out, though.

If, in my time as a Student Physical Therapist, I choose to spend every hour of class, every day, for three years, as a solemn study machine, then what do I expect my career after PT school to look like? I would probably know as much as the dictionary, with the interpersonal skills of … well, a dictionary. Don’t get me wrong. School is serious. Working with patients is serious. Physical therapists must know how to be professional and serious. However, having fun is also an essential part of being a PT. From becoming friendly with our patients to creating engaging ways to make exercises more enjoyable, there is an occupational requirement to be fun-loving, which is why fun belongs in the classroom.

So, how does Regis University put the “fun” back in the fundamentals? Long story short, it doesn’t. All the university can do is give us (the students) time, space, and some freedom. It is not the professor’s job to bring in a beach ball or play funny YouTube videos. Adding the element of fun to academia is the sole responsibility of the student. When done well, it can be seamless—and even educational.

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At the risk of sounding as arrogant as I probably am, I’ve included some tips on how even you can have fun in the classroom:

  1. Learn to love where you are. If you’re in PT school, then the prospect of learning about PT things should be pretty darn exciting. Stay excited. Stay motivated. Learn to dwell on the details like they are the difference between being a good PT and a great PT (because they are).
  2. Find time to unwind. Everyone’s brain candle burns at a different speed. Some people can sit in class for 8 hours attentively, but when they get home, they’re spent. Other students may need to get up and walk around every hour, maybe chit-chat a little between lectures, but will buckle down during independent study. Give your brain time to rest.
  3. Get moving. Hours on hours of lectures can put you into a comatose-like state. Get up and walk around when given the chance. Personally, I like to kick a soccer ball around at breaks.
  4. Finally, get to know those lovely people you call classmates. Play intramural sports, go out to a brewery, maybe even hit a weekend camping trip. Warning: spending time with people may lead to smiling, laughing, inside jokes, and friendships. Friends make class fun.

There you have it, folks, a helpful-ish guide on how to have fun in PT School.

*Shoot, I should have added “write blog post” to the list of ways to have fun.

 

 

A Non-Native’s Guide to Colorado’s Summer Playground

Name: Evan Piche, Class of 2018

Hometown: Northampton, MA

Undergrad: Colorado State University

Fun Fact: I once thought I met Danny DeVito in an airport men’s room.

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Congratulations! If you’re reading this, there is a fair chance that you are either (a) my mother, or (b) a member of the incoming Class of 2019. Welcome, and since both parties will be visiting Colorado this summer, I’d like to help get you acquainted with some of the best trails Colorado has to offer. Denver is not, strictly speaking, a mountain town in the same sense as Telluride, Steamboat Springs, and Crested Butte are. We’re kind of out on the plains, straddling two worlds—but that doesn’t mean you’ll be short on options for running, hiking, or biking. We Denverites are fortunate enough to enjoy a wealth of those opportunities for after-school outdoor recreation, and when you have a long weekend and are up for a few hours in the car, the options for adventure are limitless.

With that, I’d like to offer my favorite hiking/trail running and mountain biking destinations in the Denver-metro area and beyond. From backcountry escapes to a quick after-class workout, you’re sure to find something to do this summer. (And, while I was not specifically asked to include this, I would be remiss in my duties if I did not use this opportunity to act as your ambassador to the world of Denver’s breakfast burritos.)

Hiking/Trail Running

School day: when you only have an hour or two after class, these are the places to check out! (15- 20 minutes away)

  • Matthews/Winters – Red Rocks Loop
    • A rolling, rocky 5-7 mile loop with fantastic views of the foothills west of Denver and the world-famous and aptly named Red Rocks Amphitheater.Mathew_Winters

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  • Falcon
    • Hands down the best climb in the Denver area, this trail winds its way up four steep technical miles to the summit of Mount Falcon. From here, either retrace your steps to the parking lot nearly 2,000 feet below or continue on to explore a vast trail network.Mt_Falcon.jpg

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  • Green Mountain, Lakewood
    • A mostly gentle 5-8 mile single track loop featuring the Front Range’s best sunrise and sunset views.Green_Mtn

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Weekend: about a 90-minute drive from Denver

  • Sky Pond, Rocky Mountain National Park
    • A classic RMNP hike; after meandering around the base of Long’s Peak, the trail turns vertical and ends with a fun scramble to Sky Pond amid boulder fields and some of the Park’s most impressive glaciers.Sky_Pond_RMNP

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Long Weekend: 3-5 hours from Denver

  • West Maroon Pass, Aspen to Crested Butte
    • This is considered a rite of passage among Colorado hikers and trail runners. While the towns of Crested Butte and Aspen are separated by one hundred miles of highway, this challenging, backcountry trail connects them so that “only” 10 miles sit between them. Pack a bathing suit (or not) for a dip in Conundrum Hot Springs if you plan to do this trip properly.

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Mountain Biking

School day:

  • Lair O’ the Bear 
    • Swoopy, flowing lines, grinding climbs, open meadows, and a breathtaking view of Mount Evans—all less than 30 minutes from Denver. After riding, grab a burger or brew in one of Morrison’s quaint eateries.Lair_of_the_bear

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  • White Ranch 
    • This is a gem of a park and located only a few miles north of Golden; it offers trails that rival anything in Boulder (after all, you can see the iconic Flatirons from the parking lot) with a fraction of the traffic.White_Ranch

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  • Apex Mountain Park, Enchanted Forest Trail 
    • Apex is one of Denver’s most well-utilized mountain bike trail networks, and with good reason. The Enchanted Forest descent is not to be missed. Be sure to check the link provided for alternate direction riding restrictions on odd/even days before you go. Bonus: these trails are a blast to ride in the snow after the fat bikers, skiers, and snowshoers do all the dirty work of packing down the snow.Apex_EnchantedF_Forest

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Weekend:

  • Blue Sky to Indian Summer
    • Regardless of whether you mountain bike or hike (or climb, or paddle, or just enjoy beer), a trip to Fort Collins is always enjoyable. Fort Fun is home to one of the Front Range’s finest fast, flowing mountain bike trails. While options abound for long climbs up to the summit of Horsetooth Mountain Park, the Blue Sky Trail sticks to the lowlands, traversing a spectacular cliff line with scenery reminiscent of your favorite Western movie. Also, New Belgium brewery is not to be missed.

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Long Weekend:

  • 401 Trail, Crested Butte, CO
    • Come spring and early summer, the wildflowers on this ultra-classic trail grow to be chest-high. Imagine ripping down 14 miles of high country singletrack, with views of snowcapped mountains disappearing and reappearing as you dive into and out of fields of wildflowers so high and dense as to obscure your line of sight. Be sure to grab tacos at Teocalli Tamale once back in town.401_Trail_CB

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  • Slickrock Trail, Moab Utah
    • Quite possibly the most famous mountain bike trail in the world—and for good reason. Slickrock offers an other-worldly experience: an ocean of red sandstone surrounds you, with views of the Colorado River far below in the canyon. In the distance, the snowcapped La Sal Mountains dwarf the landscape and offer a stunning contrast to the red, pink, and orange hues of the desert. For après ride fun, check out the Moab Brewery, located right in the center of town—it’s an oasis of alcohol and burgers in an otherwise remarkably dry state.Slickrock

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Burritos

The breakfast burrito was invented in the kitchen of Tia Sophia’s in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1975. Since that historic day, it has been possible to eat a burrito for all 3 (or more) meals of the day, a feat now commonly referred to as a “hat trick.” Like most of Denver, the breakfast burrito is not native to Colorado, but found in our city a welcoming home. I am unsure of whether or not Colorado has an “official” state food, but I would nominate the breakfast burrito for that honor.

With the help of acclaimed writer and Denver resident Brendan Leonard, I have assembled the definitive guide to Denver’s Best Breakfast Burritos:

  • Grand Prize: El Taco de Mexico on Santa Fe
  • First Runner Up: Bocaza on 17th Ave.
  • Second Runner Up: Steve’s Snappin’ Dogs
  • Honorable Mention: Illegal Pete’s
  • People’s Choice: Campfire Burritos (food truck)

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    Evan is an avid biker, trail runner and climber.  We hope you enjoyed his pictures and guide to an adventurous CO summer!

 

Balancing a Relationship with PT School

Being married is the best. I get to do life with my best friend every day, and it was a definite perk that I didn’t have to find a roommate when coming to PT school. For those of you who are starting PT school this fall and are married or in a relationship, here are a few things to think about.

  1. If you’ve gotten this far and are still in a relationship, then your significant other is incredibly supportive of you. Don’t forget to thank him or her! He or she will be your biggest advocate and cheerleader over then next three years. Let them know how much you appreciate their sacrifices so that you can pursue your dream.
  1. Yes, school is tough, and you need to study. A LOT. But make sure that you don’t neglect your relationship. When I interviewed at Regis, my interviewer said to me, “We don’t want to break up marriages.” Your relationship will last far longer than your time in PT school. Do your best in school, but intentionally set time aside to spend with your significant other. They get lonely sitting on the couch quietly watching someone study all the time, so plan on doing fun things and going on dates. There’s a lot to do here in Colorado. Go explore!  Some of our dates have included:
    1. Road trip to Mt. Rushmore (it’s only 5.5 hours away!)IMG_51362. Horseback riding and snow hiking in Estes Park–it’s the entry town to Rocky Mountain National Park (1 hour away)IMG_5263.JPG3.  Hiking in Golden (15 minutes away)IMG_5862 4.  Musical at the Buell (10-15 minutes away)IMG_5634.JPG
  1. Remember that everyone’s relationship is different, and you have to find a balance that works for you. Some of my classmates have significant others who work 8-5 jobs and can have dinner together each night. They usually study during the week and take a day off on the weekends to play. My husband is an ER nurse and works 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., so there are many days that I leave before he wakes up and to bed before he gets home. He works many weekends, so I do lots of homework during the weekend and then take a day off of studying during the week when he has off.  That’s okay. Do what works for you. There is no one correct recipe for success in this program.
  1. Lastly, be patient with your significant other. He or she really likes to be with you, and it will be an adjustment for both of you adapt to PT school. Don’t get discouraged. You will make it!

Overall, is having a relationship hard during PT school? Absolutely. It’s one more thing to think about and invest in with an already filled schedule. However, you will never see your significant other’s support and kindness more than over the next three years. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

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Blogger: Katie Ragle

Federal Advocacy Forum: Regis DPT Student Katie Baratta Visits The Hill

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The APTA Federal Advocacy Forum is a national conference for APTA members across the country to convene in DC.   Its purpose? To educate members of Congress on the role of physical therapy in our communities, with the specific goal of gaining their support for the various legislative initiatives* that are currently being debated in Congress.

A part of my experience during my two-week APTA internship through the Regis University DPT program included the opportunity to attend the Forum. We started out listening to several guest speakers in preparation for our visits on Capitol Hill with the senators and representatives. Brad Fitch from the Congressional Management Foundation (CMF) presented some of the results of a survey about what types of factors impact their decision-making process.  Constituents are the citizens that a member of Congress represents, and that includes both providers and their patients. So, it is important for them to know what matters to us! Ideas for getting in touch with them are listed below.

Robert Blizzard, a partner at Public Opinion Strategies, discussed the current political climate–including different scenarios for the presidential race and the outcomes’ implications. We also had the chance to listen to Senator Richard Burr from North Carolina speak. He has been a friend to PT initiatives for a long time. One of the things that has been most refreshing to me to see is that members of Congress really do care about the same issues we care about. Members on one side of the political spectrum may believe in different ways of solving those issues from their colleagues on the other side, but despite that, there is a lot of bipartisan support for the issues we care about. There were also break-out sessions that went into greater depth on key issues facing the profession from a legislative prospective.

On the third day, we embarked with fellow APTA members from Colorado to meet with staff from the offices of our senators and representatives to discuss current legislation. We thanked the members of Congress for their support on legislation they had already co-signed, and we asked for their support on further issues. The Colorado APTA members met with the offices of Colorado’s two Senators: Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet, and also the representatives from different districts. Diana DeGette is the representative from my district, but our group also had the opportunity to meet with representatives from many other CO districts, as well.

I’ll admit it–I was nervous, at first, to speak up in those meetings. It turns out, though, that the staff members are friendly and interested in what we have to say–even as students. It was reassuring to go as a group so that we could chime in and support one other. I felt more and more confident the more I did it! My advice to any PT or student interested in meeting with their elected official would be to review the facts of what you are going to say (and write down information you might not remember easily) so that you don’t have to waste time and energy trying to recall or look up information. Each meeting lasted approximately 10-15 minutes, and it’s surprising how quickly that time goes. Relax, be yourself, and know that nobody is going to bite your head off.   🙂

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What can I, as a student or clinician, do to support advocacy at the government level?

As a citizen in this country it is your right–and, arguably, your responsibility–to petition your lawmakers directly to share the personal impact that different legislation would have on you as a current (or future) provider on your patients’ day-to-day life. Start by downloading the APTA advocacy app which will let you know who your elected officials are and which legislative issues are currently relevant to your district/state. In terms of getting in touch with lawmakers, Brad Fitch shared with us some of the ways that we can connect with Congress on issues pertinent to the PT field:

  • write emails
  • make phone calls
  • attend town hall meetings
  • make an appointment to visit their local office in person with other PTs or on your own
  • follow your legislator on social media and respond to what they post

The more people to reach out, the more impact we can have.

If you are interested in getting more involved in the political and legislative process or have additional questions, feel free to reach out to me at kbaratta@regis.edu! 

*Key issues currently include:

  • Therapy Cap: Medicare Access to Rehabilitation Services Act (currently max out at $1940 for speech and PT combined) HR 775 / S 539  more info
  • PT Workforce Bill: Physical Therapist Workforce and Patient Access (includes PTs in loan forgiveness program for healthcare providers in underserved areas) HR 2342 / S 1426 more info
  • Locum Tenens: Prevent Interruptions in Physical Therapy Act (for Medicare providers to get short-term coverage for their patients when they must take a temporary leave of absence) HR 556/S 313  more info
  • Safe Play: Supporting Athletes, Families, and Educators to Protect the Lives of Athletic Youth Act / SAFE PLAY Act (include PTs in the discussion for developing standardized concussion management guidelines) HR 4829 / S 436 more info
  • Rehabilitation Research: Enhancing the Stature and Visibility of Medical Rehabilitation Research at the NICH Act (streamlines rehabilitation research, improves coordination between different organizations) HR1631 / S 800
  • PTs Travelling with Sports Teams: Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act (include PTs along with ATs and physicians in the existing legislation extending the state license of sports medicine providers who travel with a sports team across state lines to treat a traveling team) HR 921 / S 689
  • Self-Referral: Promoting Integrity in Medicare Act (proposes removing PT as an exception to the Stark Law, ie prevents Physicians from referring Medicare patients to entities in which they have a financial interest – eg a physician-owned PT service) HR 2914
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Blogger: Katie Baratta

My name is Katie Baratta and I just graduated from Regis University School of Physical Therapy. I had the opportunity to spend two weeks at the APTA doing a student internship. I was able to talk to many different members of the APTA, attend the Federal Advocacy Forum, and learn more about what the APTA has been doing to move our profession forward. Check in next Tuesday for more!

Commuting to Class: Meet Leigh Dugan

Name: Leigh Dugan

Hometown: Boston, Massachusetts

Undergrad: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Fun Fact: My husband is in the military and we have moved 4 times in 2 years!!

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Hi, Class of 2019! Congratulations on your acceptance to the Regis DPT program; you will not regret your decision to come here. So, now that you have made the choice to make Denver, CO your home, the next step is deciding where to live. Most of you will live close by, so getting to school will not be a problem. However, there may be a few of you that do not have the luxury to live that close for whatever reason. This was the situation that I found myself in a year ago when I decided to go to Regis in the fall. My family could not relocate to Denver and I made the decision to commute from Colorado Springs each day—a 140-mile roundtrip journey on each side of an 8-5pm class day.

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Leigh, Taylor and Amanada enjoying some time off of school

I decided to write this blog post because I wish that I had been able to talk to someone to tell me that yes, it is possible and yes, it will be tough. If this is something you are trying to figure out before beginning PT school in August, here are a few tips that I would love to share with you to hopefully make your decision easier:

  1. The commute IS indeed possible and was actually quite relaxing after a long school day.
  2. Take the time during your drive to decompress. Sometimes, I would sit in absolute silence and take the time to relax and reflect on the day. It is a good excuse to truly do nothing.
  3. Be prepared to not have much of a life. When you drive for 3 hours each day, most of your free time is devoted to studying. I wish I could say that there wasn’t much work outside of school in the first year, but that is not the case. Be prepared to spend a few hours after class each day doing school work or studying.
  4. To add to the above comment, you have to really make an effort to balance fun times and studying in your free time. This is so important for anyone in PT school to ensure that you keep your sanity!
  5. Group projects can be tough to coordinate, but all of my classmates took into consideration my commute and it worked out fine.
  6. Find a good podcast that is “mindless.” After a long day of learning, you will want something that is entertaining but isn’t taxing on your mind.
  7. Waze, the traffic app, will be your best friend.
  8. You will figure out the best times to leave your house in order to dodge traffic. I really learned to take advantage of the extra time I had at school before and after class to get work done so I wouldn’t have to do it at home.
  9. It is tough to miss out on all of the fun activities after class. A lot of times, my classmates would go out to concerts or for drinks on weekends and it would be hard to miss these moments. Make an effort to still engage with your class! I never regretted spending the night on a couch so I could join in on the fun :).
  10. Do not be afraid to ask for help from your classmates. You will find that everyone in your class is on the same team and they truly want to help. I would not have survived without them!
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Brunch after second semester finals

Feel free to email me if you have any specific questions on commuting or any questions at all about Regis! Congratulations again on your acceptance to Regis!

Blogger: Leigh Dugan, ldugan@regis.edu

What is a Regis DPT service learning project?

Every semester, Regis DPT students participate in a service learning project that gives us the opportunity to work out in the community. Our first semester project didn’t happen due to some pesky snow; this semester, though, we had many options to get involved with different disabled populations. Others in my class spent time at weekend retreat camps for children with motor and mental disabilities, skiing with those with mobility impairments, and bowling with people with Down syndrome. As a former ballet dancer, I was attracted to the dance program that was listed in our options.

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Some students spent some days up at Keystone and helped people with disabilities ski!

Spoke N’ Motion is a fully integrated dance company. When I say fully integrated, I really mean it! During my time with the company, I have met many members who have vision, hearing, and mobility impairments along with other members who have autism, Down syndrome, or lesser detectable disabilities. I remember walking into the rehearsal the first day—I had absolutely no idea how it was going to work. How do you get a group with such different levels to dance together? Honestly, I expected the rehearsal to be messy and difficult.

It was the opposite of that. An individual with visual impairments stood to the side and watched a few times before joining. Those in wheelchairs used their arms to mimic the leg movements. The younger kids kept up with the adults. I was amazed and so honored that I was getting to experience a little slice of it. The company performs regularly! I entered with a narrow mind about what I would be experiencing, but they opened me up to so many new ideas.

My project only required a handful of hours, yet I have found myself going back every week. I’m no longer a person who is dancing with Spoke N’ Motion as a project for school;  I’m a member of the company. I have fun dancing with everyone there. They have a performance coming up next month, and I’m even dancing in the show.

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Our company practicing! Pic: Carl Payne

The atmosphere of the company is of overwhelming joy. One member posts in the private Facebook group every Friday before rehearsals about how excited she is to see everyone the next day. For many there, this company is a place where their varying abilities are highlighted as a good thing. We push the boundaries of what I thought was ‘okay.’ Who would have thought it was okay to stand on the back of a wheelchair to do spins?

Service learning is an amazing opportunity to get out of our ‘school brains.’ We get to work with real people and see how concepts from class can be applied. Being open to new and uncomfortable situations is an important part of our education. I, for one, am glad I go to a university that encourages service learning!

And, if you happen to be around Denver next month: come see us dance! Performances are May 14 and 15th. Look here for tickets: http://www.spokenmotiondance.org/performances.html

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Blogger: Madeleine Sutton

Candidates take interviews by a storm

Literally and figuratively.

The candidates have finished their interviews in typical Denver fashion: 60 degrees and sunny on Friday and, naturally, 30 degrees with an impending storm on Monday.

With campus closing early on Monday, the admissions team and faculty worked hard to try to get all of the candidates a thorough and holistic view of the program while also having to shorten the interview day.  The candidates were wonderful in their flexibility due to the weather!

As a first year student, this weekend brought back a lot of memories from a year ago, when I was in the decision-making process for schools.  The incredibly high caliber of student I got to interact with over this weekend reminded me largely of why I chose Regis: this programs attracts future PTs that will care for the entire person and are passionate about service and learning.  Similarly, hearing the faculty introduce themselves and discuss their passions with the candidates reminded me that, although we may call the faculty by their first names and be close with them, they are leaders on a national stage.

I think that having current students so involved in the admissions weekend accurately reflects what this program encourages: community involvement, leadership, and teaching are all essential elements to becoming a good clinician.  It was a lot of fun having the candidates in lab with us!

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To all of the candidates, best of luck!  This is an uncertain time for all of you, and I can relate to how you are feeling.  Know that the current students at Regis are here to answer any questions you may have, and we will be posting about different people’s admission experiences and decisions in the coming weeks.

Please feel free to reach out to Lindsay or myself (we are the 1st and 2nd year admissions reps. Hi.) with any thoughts/questions/concerns you may have!

 

Blogger: Carol Passarelli

 

On the interview weekend: Meet Michael Young

Michael Young

Hometown: Madison, WI

Undergrad: University of Wisconsin, Madison

Fun fact: I visited 16 states in 30 days during an epic summer road trip.

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During the summer of 2014, I found myself in Denver, five hours early for a flight. It was a picturesque day: 82 degrees in the afternoon sun and even more comfortable in the shade. I saw a sign for Regis University and recognized the name as one with a PT program, so I took the nearest exit and walked around campus for the afternoon.  After wandering around the classrooms and watching part of a lacrosse practice, I felt like this was a place I could see myself spending the next three years.

Six months and many applications later, I was back at Regis—this time for an interview. I woke up early on the day and did some yoga in the room of my Airbnb. That’s not my normal routine, but I wanted to do everything in my power to calm my nerves. That morning, yoga took me to my happy place. I put on my suit, threw on my coat and started my three-block walk to campus.

This time on campus, it was cold. After living in Texas for five years, January in Denver made me remember my roots in Madison.  I had made the dangerous 6AM decision to skip my morning coffee; would I lapse into caffeine withdrawal and spend the day with a pounding headache? Or, maybe, would my pumping adrenaline take the place of that necessary stimulant? I worried about it for the next seven hours. It’s funny what really makes you nervous on interview day.

Looking back, I now realize that the interview was the easiest part of the day for me. As soon as I sat down with my interviewer, I knew that Regis was different from the other schools. My interview was a conversation about my past experiences and current hobbies in lieu of the usual discussion of GPA, prerequisite record and knowledge of the PT field. They didn’t ask why a political science major was interested in PT school; they told me how important it was to have people with diverse backgrounds integrated into the profession. They made me feel like my personality and individualism mattered.

The next 24 hours was an emotional roller coaster of second-guessing interview responses, dreaming of an aggressive interviewer who compared me to a chiropractor (gasp!) and an overwhelming feeling of relief and gratitude for the amazing day I had at Regis. As I sat at the Denver airport waiting for my 6AM outbound flight, I started daydreaming about coming back as an actual student. Regis was the school for me and I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else. When I got the acceptance email, I knew my life would never be the same. Now, six months into school, I haven’t been proven wrong.

Best of luck with your interviews, candidates! I hope you feel as at home as I did.

PT School: No longer a pain in the neck

Sitting, studying, stress:  we’ve all felt tense around the shoulders and neck before.  First years, in particular, would attest to some serious cramping after so many hours of studying first semester.

Luckily, one of our second semester classes focuses on the biomechanics of the spine.  And, with that, we get to learn how to test ligaments and facilitate movement between spinal segments.

In our lab yesterday, we focused on the lower cervical spine and were trying to incorporate concepts of biomechanics with learning how to work gently and professionally with other people’s necks.

Although we had to understand the proper movement of each vertebrae, I think the most important take-away from this first exposure was learning how to be comfortable and confident when handling someone else’s head.  I think we all enjoyed taking turns getting different segments of our neck isolated; it felt like a massage after all that sitting!

Blogger: Carol Passarelli

Weekend study breaks and 14ers: Meet Chris Aguirre

IMG_4621Chris Aguirre

Hometown: Chandler, AZ

Undergrad: Arizona State University

Fun fact: I can eat an entire Costco pizza faster than I can run a mile.

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When I first moved to Colorado, I was overwhelmed with how many new things this state had to offer and couldn’t wait to start trying things. Top of my bucket list: to summit one of Colorado’s 53 fourteeners.

I was born and raised in the hot-basking blaze of Phoenix, Arizona where the highest peak in the valley is an enormous 2,610 feet. Just imagining being over 14,000 feet above sea level has a certain “aww” factor to it. So, one October weekend some of us 2018ers headed out to the wilderness (just outside of Breckenridge) to camp out and then climb Quandary’s peak.

Our trek began around 8am and the steep ascent began almost immediately. The path was well traveled and very easy to follow up; with the little hiking experience I had, I began thinking that if the whole way up was like this, I was in for an easy morning! The sun was shining, the temperature was awesome, tall green pines surrounded me, and my brand new hiking boots were feeling great. This feeling lasted for about 30 minutes. The elevation quickly got to me and I found myself feeling out-of-breath like the out-of-shape college grad I was.

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All morning, our classmate, Paul, had been leading the group super fast. It was pretty perfect that we started calling Paul a mountain goat and, after we reached the saddle, we saw an actual mountain goat chilling on the mountain.IMG_4627

The great thing about being so high up was that the view kept becoming more and more unbelievable as we continued. This meant many “scenic breaks” and I was a-okay with that—it gave me a chance to catch my breath.

As we ascended above the tree line level the trail became very rocky. The wind had also started to pick up; it was getting pretty cold and hard to climb. We reached the saddle and all gathered around to talk about if we should continue with the hike. There were numerous people coming back down from the summit who were saying the winds at the top were 60+ mph and pretty dangerous. None of us really wanted to end our first 14er early, though, so we continued trekking.

The last 300 feet to the summit was difficult, but as soon as we reached the top, the view was remarkable…remarkably cold and windy. We quickly jumped into a divot surrounded by rocks to try and break some of the wind around us and avoid being blown off the mountain. Luckily, there were two other people at the summit who were nice enough to take the typical candid picture of our group at the top.

We almost immediately started to descend back down the mountain after a few great pictures so we could escape the wind and start to feel our faces again. On the way down it dawned on me that we had just made it to 14,265 feet!  We got back down to our cars and then—of course—had to stop for celebratory pizza and beer on the way home.

It is so surreal that these gigantic mountains are now right in my backyard. I think the coolest part about moving to Colorado (besides the great PT program, classmates, and faculty) is how many different places there are too explore.

What makes it even better is having classmates who share similar interests in and outside of the classroom and are always excited to try new things. Good luck to all of you on your interviews! Relax, be yourself, and hope to see you next year!

 

Commuting, anatomy groups, and transitions: Meet Amanda Rixey

Amanda Rixey

Hometown: Overland Park, KS

Undergrad: University of Kansas

Fun fact: I used to be a ballet dancer.
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Transitioning from life as a dance major in undergrad to life as a physical therapy student was a challenge.  I used to spend eight or more hours a day in dance classes or rehearsals with a few science classes interspersed. The switch to a mixture of lectures and labs throughout the day was difficult to get used to; as someone who needs to constantly be active, I found my biggest challenge of first semester was sitting in my chair during lectures!  Luckily, because the faculty similarly love movement, we get 10-minute breaks every hour to move around and stretch.

Another challenge I found was getting used to city life.  As someone who previously would do anything to avoid driving on highways, I had to brave rush hour traffic in order to get to school on time.  I tried taking side roads, but it took me almost 45 minutes!  I think it’s safe to say I’ve mastered driving them after a few months of living here (even though my car did die on the side of the road on the first day of school).

Regis does a fantastic job making sure their students feel comfortable. At the beginning of the semester, our class was divided into anatomy lab groups based on our personality and learning types.  This was the most beneficial part of first semester—I was able to take the data from my results and use this to understand how I learn and how I communicate with my classmates and professors (they are surprisingly accurate…and I love personality tests!).  Also, our groups were formed with students of different learning styles; this worked out wonderfully, despite what you might think.  I am a student who doesn’t necessarily like to take on leadership positions.  Luckily, I was in a group where a few students would facilitate how we would go about dissecting or starting a project.  A bonus of spending an inordinate amount of time with a cadaver and my group is that now I have five other students I can go to for anything and feel comfortable working with.

Because of the relaxed learning environment we had in my anatomy group, anatomy became my favorite course of first semester.  The intricate detail and vast amount of material from Cliff, our professor, made it a fun challenge for me and made me determined to work hard to learn as much as I could.  Dissecting was also a new challenge; I think working in groups made it much more doable, though, and we were able to learn from each other.  My biggest piece of advice is to figure out your strengths within the group are and to stick to them when you work together.

Overall, first semester had some kinks in it, but the professors and fellow students really helped out.  I’m looking forward to going to classes with my classmates and learning new material that will build on the fundamentals we learned last semester.

Coming from another career: Meet Katie Ragle

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I used to doubt whether or not I could hack it in PT school. I have a degree in broadcasting and digital media with minors in editing and publishing and theatre. I once had the hopes of a career in public relations and worked for a few years before realizing that I need to do something that I’m actually passionate about. I quit my job, took the prerequisites for PT school, and applied to several schools around the country. I was born and raised in Orlando, Florida, and attended undergrad in Ohio, and my husband and I were ready for a new adventure.

When I arrived on campus at Regis for my interview, I could tell that it would be different than other interviews I had encountered. Faculty and current students welcomed all those who were interviewing and encouraged us to ask our probing questions that the website doesn’t reveal. The entire interview day was incredibly people-focused. Everyone with whom I spoke emphasized how much people matter at Regis. They continually stressed that faculty do everything they can to help students thrive. I heard many times, “We start with 80 students in the class, and we want to finish with 80. We don’t want to weed people out. We want them to succeed.” As someone who has never taken advanced science classes and only took the minimum prerequisites to apply to PT school, I reveled at the thought of having people who would come alongside me if I needed additional help with classes.

After my tour of the campus and discussions with current students, I started to picture myself at Regis, but I wanted to see how my faculty interview went to verify all of the wonderful things that the students claimed about them. It didn’t disappoint. When I sat down in my interview with one of the predominant faculty members in the program, her first question didn’t deal with my GRE score or observation hours. She looked at me and asked, “So, how does your husband feel about your going to PT school? You’re going to need his support over the next few years. We don’t want to break up marriages.” We talked more about school-life balance, and she encouraged me that it would be worth it. She wasn’t trying to sell me on Regis, but she sure did.

After I was accepted to Regis, I wondered if the program would be as people-focused as the interview. It was. It terrified me to think that I would be a fish out of water surrounded by exercise science and kinesiology majors, but around 40% of the students in our class are career changers like me. Those who do have more of a science background are more than willing to help fill in the gaps for those of us who need it. Our class is more collaborative than I could have ever hoped for. Rather than competing with each other, we share study guides freely. We call our nationally recognized professors by their first name. Are the academics rigorous? Absolutely. PT school is one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. But I know that I’m not alone, and that’s how I know I made the right choice in Regis.

Good luck in all your applications and interviews! Don’t be nervous; you’ll do great!

Katie

P.S. On my first day of class, the professor who interviewed me ran up to me, gave me a hug, and told me how happy she was to see me. I get to have her for a class this semester. How cool is that?

Transitioning to PT school: Meet Chris Lew

Christopher Lew

Hometown: Eugene, OR

Undergrad: University of Portland

Fun fact: I have a whistle reminiscent of various fairy tale soundtracks…or so I’m told.

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On the first semester and transitioning into graduate school:

First semester of PT school: check. Reflecting on how PT school has been thus far will now, hopefully, be more objective following a month of winter break and relaxation (thank goodness no one asked me how it was going in the middle of finals week). To sum up how the first semester was, I would say that it was definitely challenging and frustrating at times but, overall, it was better than expected. Despite the initial fears that I –as well as many of my peers– had at the beginning of the semester of having to remediate classes or, even worse, failing out of PT school before even really getting started, I survived with a little bit (read: a lot) of hard work, determination and nights far below the recommended hours of sleep.

My favorite class of the first semester was our Biomechanics and Kinesiology class; it consisted largely of applied anatomy and I could easily see how it related directly to our practice as physical therapists. I would talk to second and third years who would mention roll and slide when doing manipulations so I knew what we were learning was valuable. However, the great thing, in my opinion, about Regis is that all of our classes, in one way or another, directly relate to our practice. Whether it’s learning how to measure vital signs in MAP I, review PT literature in Critical Inquiry or palpate the piriformis in Anatomy, it’s all relevant. It’s remarkable, really, to look at how much we’ve learned in three short months of PT school. I remember practicing palpation on my boyfriend the day before our exam and thinking how cool it was that I could name practically every bony prominence and major superficial artery, vein and nerve on the human body. Just thinking of how much we are capable of learning in such a short period of time gives me motivation and the desire to want to learn and do more so that I can become a better physical therapist.

For those considering PT school, I’ll say that it’s similar to undergraduate education; however, there are a few pretty significant differences. To start off, you will be in class a lot more than you were in undergrad. As a double major in college, I mostly took the maximum number of credits allowed and still managed to have whole or half days off each semester. In PT school, be prepared for long days of lectures and labs from 8AM to 5PM at least a few times a week. As far as workload/intensity, I would say that PT school is definitely more difficult—although not unbearably so—than undergrad. Given that it’s a doctorate program, a lot more is expected than simply skimming the surface of the material. You will spend entire days studying and preparing for exams and assignments, and oftentimes will have to begin preparing days or weeks in advance, rather than hours. However, in the end, the formula for survival/success is essentially the same: dedicate yourself to your education, be and stay motivated and routinely give yourself a break to prevent burnout and preserve the aforementioned qualities.

Just like any new major endeavor in life, there will be some bumps in the road when starting PT school. I think one key thing for anyone starting PT school is to acknowledge and appreciate what method of studying works best for that individual. It took me a couple of weeks to get into the groove of being back in school, and those first few weeks were some of the roughest I’ve had in a long time. Nevertheless, once I learned how to study for Anatomy, prioritize my workload and juggle multiple classes and commitments at once, things got a lot smoother. Oh, and one last thing: be kind to your classmates and help each other out. These are people you will be spending practically every day with for the next three years, so you might as well be friends. I’m grateful for the fact that I (objectively) have some of the kindest and most genuine classmates I could ask for. I can count on multiple people sharing their study guides before an exam as well as being willing to help teach me something I’m struggling with in one of our classes. Having a community of peers who experience the same joys and pains of school is probably the most valuable thing for me in times of distress as well as celebration. And it’s pretty awesome to think that in a short 2.5 years we’ll be walking down the same aisle as all we graduate from Regis  together.